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Kicking back in Manitoulin


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24 minutes ago, Anna N said:

Perhaps @ElainaA will pop in here and solve the mystery for us. 

 

I'm not @ElainaA, but I saved her recipe from an earlier post and it appears the basil ribbons go over pasta.  Here is what I had saved:

 

Quote

Slow Roasted Tomato Sauce with Basil and Parmesan. It takes along time to cook but it is worth it.
Preheat oven to 250. Heat 1/4 cup olive oil. Add 1 large onion, diced and 6 cloves garlic, diced. Cook about 4-5 minutes. Remove from heat and stir in 18 (yes! the recipe is this specific! You don't have to be!) shredded basil leaves and 1/8 t. red pepper flakes. 
In a deep roasting pan, combine 50 cherry tomatoes (I told you the recipe is specific - and I use more) with 2 t. sugar, 1 t. salt and onion mixture. Drizzle with 1/4 c. olive oil. Roast in 250 degree oven for 3 hours, stirring once. Serve over pasta with 1/2 c. parmesan and 1/4 c. basil ribbons.
I like this with a mix of different colored cherry tomatoes

 

 

Edited to add:  Here's a link to the post that I copied this from in the Gardening thread.

Edited by blue_dolphin (log)
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2 hours ago, Anna N said:

IMG_3828.thumb.JPG.1641406c753f3cd645c2e73d3c067ac5.JPG

After I crawled under the covers in my bedroom to try and get warm I decided perhaps something to eat might work also. So I cooked up some bacon and made an open faced bacon and tomato sandwich. Now I'm going to find a pair of socks and make myself a hot coffee and see if that does it. I could turn on the heat but I refuse to surrender that far. 

 

You're making me feel sweaty just reading this :P

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4 hours ago, JohnT said:

 

Is that natural home-made pea soup or made from a bulk catering pack? It really does not look too green like what I make with our locally purchased Canadian split peas. I will be cooking up a batch this weekend and will click a picture (If I remember).

Home made for sure. Might be a combination of yellow and green split peas.

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IMG_5316.jpg.4f088f3766c37785d32fe486fe19d614.jpg

 

Totally made up drink - called it the "Craft Moment" - 11/2 ounces crown royal Northern Harvest Canadian Rye, 1 ounce sweet vermouth, 1/2 ounce each cynar and St Germain.

 

 

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5 hours ago, Anna N said:

Perhaps @ElainaA will pop in here and solve the mystery for us. 

 

 

So sorry - I have not had time to be here much . The mistake is mine. The 18  (more or less in my opinion) get shredded and roasted with the tomatoes. The addition 1/4 cup of basil ribbons are tossed with the pasta before serving. I will edit the recipe if I can. (Sometimes I find i am not allowed to edit posts after awhile.)

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If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need. Cicero

But the library must contain cookbooks. Elaina

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29 minutes ago, ElainaA said:

So sorry - I have not had time to be here much . The mistake is mine. The 18  (more or less in my opinion) get shredded and roasted with the tomatoes. The addition 1/4 cup of basil ribbons are tossed with the pasta before serving. I will edit the recipe if I can. (Sometimes I find i am not allowed to edit posts after awhile.)

 

Thank you.  I've made the changes to my copy.  Looking forward to trying this.

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Playing with the Carlota de Limón icebox cake that @MelissaHintroduced us to the other day. 

 

IMG_5320.jpg.1a1696e4bb4bd65e079104f7b7a3f62f.jpg

 

Some assembly required.

 

IMG_5321.jpg.fb051c52f6eb2e5219d1bf10255ce93f.jpg

 

We shall see how it un-molds tomorrow. Next issue will be finding something on which to present it.

 

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38 minutes ago, Okanagancook said:

CR Northern Harvest........nice choice :x

Never been a great fan of Crown Royal (or any Canadian Whisky really) - but I was wooed by the special blends of John Hall at Forty Creek and when people were fighting to get bottles of this one when it first came out - I just had to have one! It's pretty smooth and doesn't give me heartburn like a lot of the rye heavy whiskies do.

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I believe it was rated as the best rye whisky on the planet a couple of years ago.  This must be a blend under the same name and hopefully the same craftspeople but obviously liquor from different barrels.

 

i went on a tour of Forty Creek about 8 or 9 years ago.  The barrel warehouse was quite impressive.

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25 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

Never been a great fan of Crown Royal (or any Canadian Whisky really) - but I was wooed by the special blends of John Hall at Forty Creek and when people were fighting to get bottles of this one when it first came out - I just had to have one! It's pretty smooth and doesn't give me heartburn like a lot of the rye heavy whiskies do.

Canadian whiskey to me tastes like college parties.

 

Not a good memory.

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26 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

Never been a great fan of Crown Royal (or any Canadian Whisky really) - but I was wooed by the special blends of John Hall at Forty Creek and when people were fighting to get bottles of this one when it first came out - I just had to have one! It's pretty smooth and doesn't give me heartburn like a lot of the rye heavy whiskies do.

 

My favorite Canadian whisky is WhistlePig.

 

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1 minute ago, Okanagancook said:

I believe it was rated as the best rye whisky on the planet a couple of years ago.  This must be a blend under the same name and hopefully the same craftspeople but obviously liquor from different barrels.

 

i went on a tour of Forty Creek about 8 or 9 years ago.  The barrel warehouse was quite impressive.

Yeah - didn't get my hands on one of those bottles - though I did try.

 

Forty Creek is on my way to work - the Matt's came down and we toured a few years ago before Campari took them over when John Hall was releasing one of his new blends. He gave us the tour and tasting and we left with a few very nice bottles. 

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2 minutes ago, gfweb said:

Canadian whiskey to me tastes like college parties.

 

Not a good memory.

Well, if you get your hands on some Northern Harvest it is worth a try

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1 minute ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

My favorite Canadian whisky is WhistlePig.

 

I had to go to the US to get a bottle of that to send overseas sadly - of course found it in my local LCBO a week later when they relisted it.

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7 hours ago, Anna N said:

Here's some more information on the future of our swing bridge for those who have an interest in  such things. 

 

Sorry to hear for the residents of Manitoulin.  I can empathize.  Though I am a citizen of the sovereign state that invented Bridgegate, the local bridge problems have been more insidious.  I live on a river, OK actually about two thirds mile from a river as the crow flies or as the local stream meanders.

 

This town is hard on bridges,  Rochambeau and the French army pulled down the bridge north of town.  Washington and his troops pulled down the bridge to the south.

 

The current bridge was closed for repairs just over a year ago, 7/7/2016.  Two days later the state stopped all road construction because of budget cuts.  I shan't say more for reason of politics, but work resumed last winter only to be blocked for environmental concerns.

 

The bridge finally reopened to traffic two months ago.  Meanwhile commuters went through hell and local businesses failed.  Not to mention logistics problems of fire fighters and rescue squads.

 

My advice to Manitoulin is to keep the old swing bridge as it is, but leave it open to shipping.  Build a new bridge high enough to pass an aircraft carrier.  Get the government in Ottawa to pay for it.

 

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10 hours ago, ElainaA said:

So sorry - I have not had time to be here much . The mistake is mine. The 18  (more or less in my opinion) get shredded and roasted with the tomatoes. The addition 1/4 cup of basil ribbons are tossed with the pasta before serving. I will edit the recipe if I can. (Sometimes I find i am not allowed to edit posts after awhile.)

No worries. Mine turned out just fine!  

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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7 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Sorry to hear for the residents of Manitoulin.  I can empathize.  Though I am a citizen of the sovereign state that invented Bridgegate, the local bridge problems have been more insidious.  I live on a river, OK actually about two thirds mile from a river as the crow flies or as the local stream meanders.

 

This town is hard on bridges,  Rochambeau and the French army pulled down the bridge north of town.  Washington and his troops pulled down the bridge to the south.

 

The current bridge was closed for repairs just over a year ago, 7/7/2016.  Two days later the state stopped all road construction because of budget cuts.  I shan't say more for reason of politics, but work resumed last winter only to be blocked for environmental concerns.

 

The bridge finally reopened to traffic two months ago.  Meanwhile commuters went through hell and local businesses failed.  Not to mention logistics problems of fire fighters and rescue squads.

 

My advice to Manitoulin is to keep the old swing bridge as it is, but leave it open to shipping.  Build a new bridge high enough to pass an aircraft carrier.  Get the government in Ottawa to pay for it.

 

Since the span is a few hundred meters at most - you'd be going straight up and straight down on a bridge that high or it would have to start in Espanola and end in Wiki.

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 Good morning I have already posted my breakfast photo over on the breakfast thread but here it is again.

 

IMG_3840.thumb.JPG.115f0e141519e15f2fcd1a8f1bec9d25.JPG

  The egg was fried in a cast iron skillet proving that Kerry knows how to season a pan. This is not the new 12 inch pan but an older 8" pan.

 

 So here's your challenge for today. We have lots and lots if leftover rice. Kerry wants some golden fried rice which we had at a Japanese restaurant. She swears she tasted sesame but we are coming up blank on a recipe.

 

I want some Middle Eastern-style rice using leftover rice. 

 

Anyone?

 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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