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Dinner 2017 (Part 6)


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My phone was upstairs when dinner was ready, so no pics.  Roasted chicken, wood-fired, baked potato, snap peas and salad.  Dessert was homemade non-dairy peanut butter/lightly salted caramel ice cream with dark chocolate chips. 

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Mark

My eG Food Blog

www.markiscooking.com

My NEW Ribs site: BlasphemyRibs.com

My NEWER laser stuff site: Lightmade Designs

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Whoa.. My New grind COMBINATION.. forgit all the GQ cuts.. Bottom Sirloin and Short rib.. Marinated meat ( pre grind ) in Hatch dried red chilies in Apple Juice. Large grind

Tillamook cheese
Fresh ABQ chilies

 

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Its good to have Morels

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12 hours ago, scubadoo97 said:

 

Amberjack on banana leaf with sliced green olives, toasted coconut, macadamia nuts and red peppers and zucchini  

 

 

I read that initially as "amberjack on banana loaf" and had a bit of a moment. 

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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Ronnie has a good friend/his old business partner who is now in his 80's and can't get around like he used to.  So, this friend always takes Ronnie on a pen raised pheasant hunt this time of year.  You go to this big lodge type place, they take you out, you shoot birds, they clean them and then you all eat lunch.  It's not pheasant season yet, but this place has special permission.   Anyway, they divide the birds up between all of the hunters so you don't probably get the exact birds that you shot (some of these were reaaaallllly shot up lol).  I think he came home with around 10 breasts (you aren't allowed to clean your own birds, they have some kind of group that comes in and does it and then they take the legs and the hearts and livers and have some kind of a game feed).  As you all know, the livers and hearts are my favorite parts sigh.  So, I fried some up and pressure cooked them and then vac packed and froze the rest.  They were good.

 

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1 minute ago, kayb said:

Have never had/cooked pheasant. I've heard it tends to be dry. Does it? If so, what do you do to it to offset that?

 

It can be dry.  The pen raised ones seem to be more tender than the wild guys.  Bake low and slow or, as I did last night, fry quickly and then put them in the Instant Pot for 15 mins on high.  So tender.

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@robirdstx – thank you for the directions.  I’ll be trying those soon!

 

@Captain – those crusty spuds look fantastic!  Exactly like I like them.  Would you share the method?

 

Mr. Kim got a recommendation from a co-worker for this soup:

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It is Creamy Garlic Mushroom Soup.  He and Jessica loved it.  I am not a mushroom eater.  Very inexpensive and easy to make.  He only needed a little help.

 

Steak night.  Mr. Kim’s plate:

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Steak, roasted beets w/ sherry vinegar, roasted Brussel sprouts and sweet potato.

 

Mine with baked potato and NO beets:D:

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Canadian Thanksgiving dinner:  turkey thigh, gravy, stuffing, glazed carrots, cranberry sauce and braised fennel.  The thigh is free range organic and weighed 1 lb 6 oz before I cooked.  Delicious.  Have another thigh for tonight.

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2 hours ago, Okanagancook said:

Canadian Thanksgiving dinner:  turkey thigh, gravy, stuffing, glazed carrots, cranberry sauce and braised fennel.  The thigh is free range organic and weighed 1 lb 6 oz before I cooked.  Delicious.  Have another thigh for tonight.

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I searched for a Canadian Thanksgiving thread this morning  so I could bump it and wish ya'll Happy Turkey Day, but I couldn't find one--I swear I remember seeing one before.  Anyway :

 

HAPPY THANKSGIVING!!!!

 

Your whole meal has me drooling especially the stuffing.  I am so hungry for stuffing.

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Here's ours.  Capon with stuffing, gravy, sweet potatoes, yellow beans, mashed potatoes and cranberry sauce.  @Okanagancook can you give proportions for your cranberry sauce?  Mine was just orange juice, sugar and cranberries, put through a food mill because someone doesn't like the skins and a bit of gelatin added to set it.  Dulce de leche pumpkin pie with whipped cream for dessert.

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I am still playing with my new oven. Thursday, they are coming to replace my vent with a matching OTR microwave.  I made two pizzas with my sourdough bread dough as the base. I added Italian sausage, mushrooms, onions, pepperoni, black olives and an assortment of leftover cheeses.  Charlie always complain that I put too many toppings on my pizzas.  One of these days I'll remember and simplify.  I try to add what he likes and then add what I want. 

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Edited by Norm Matthews (log)
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21 minutes ago, Norm Matthews said:

Charlie always complain that I put too many toppings on my pizzas.  One of these days I'll remember and simplify.  I try to add what he likes and then add what I want. 

 

Just add yours to one half.

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Mark

My eG Food Blog

www.markiscooking.com

My NEW Ribs site: BlasphemyRibs.com

My NEWER laser stuff site: Lightmade Designs

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5 hours ago, Okanagancook said:

Canadian Thanksgiving dinner:  turkey thigh, gravy, stuffing, glazed carrots, cranberry sauce and braised fennel.  The thigh is free range organic and weighed 1 lb 6 oz before I cooked.  Delicious.  Have another thigh for tonight.

 

 

Growing up we never did a turkey because nobody in my family cares for it much, but now my nearest and dearest are big on the traditional meal. This year I got to do the turkey, so I separated the breast and dark meat and roasted them in separate pans. Mashed potatoes, boiled carrots, baked squash, rum & butter glazed sweet potatoes, roasted local late-season asparagus, broccolini from my backyard garden, greens from my backyard garden, pan-caramelized parsnips, a whole roasted cauliflower, and plenty of stuffing and gravy. Also I made a braided loaf, "just for nice." And there was homemade cranberry-orange sauce. Y'all can tell I like my side dishes, right? 

 

For dessert, apple pie and carrot cake. No photos, because I didn't think of it. 

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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7 minutes ago, chromedome said:

 

Growing up we never did a turkey because nobody in my family cares for it much, but now my nearest and dearest are big on the traditional meal. This year I got to do the turkey, so I separated the breast and dark meat and roasted them in separate pans. Mashed potatoes, boiled carrots, baked squash, rum & butter glazed sweet potatoes, roasted local late-season asparagus, broccolini from my backyard garden, greens from my backyard garden, pan-caramelized parsnips, a whole roasted cauliflower, and plenty of stuffing and gravy. Also I made a braided loaf, "just for nice." And there was homemade cranberry-orange sauce. Y'all can tell I like my side dishes, right? 

 

For dessert, apple pie and carrot cake. No photos, because I didn't think of it. 

 

Growing up, I had to fight for every turkey I ever got. My father claimed the Army fed him turkey every day on the troop ship headed to and from Korea, and he didn't care if he EVER saw another turkey. So I'd wind up winning and getting turkey about every other year for Thanksgiving (it was almost always ham for Christmas). 

 

Now, I cook a turkey every Thanksgiving. Last year, my farmer who supplies all my meat saved me a turkey to slaughter just before the holiday. Since he was a fresh bird, I didn't get to specify how large I wanted him; he would be however big he got. He was 24 pounds. There were five adults and one kid. I saved one whole side of the breast, vacuum packed it, and then took it out and sliced it along with the ham for Christmas. And I had turkey broth and shredded leftover turkey frozen for-freakin'-ever.

 

Best turkey I ever cooked, though. Got another one coming this year. And if he's 24 pounds, well, he just is, and we'll have turkey aplenty to do us for a while.

 

My traditional Thanksgiving meal always includes sweet potato casserole, cranberry salad (with apples and oranges and pecans, family recipe we've had every Thanksgiving and Christmas long as I can remember, cornbread dressing, giblet gravy, generally homemade mac and cheese for the sons-in-law, who love it, and a green thing of some description (roasted broccoli, green beans or Brussels sprouts). I always make a couple of desserts, including the obligatory pumpkin pie (for which I do not care, but the eldest child does), but we rarely get into them until the next day.

 

Leftover cornbread dressing , mixed with some giblet gravy and spread in a ramekin with a "nest" hollowed out in the middle, makes an ideal vessel for a baked egg the next morning, btw.

 

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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6 hours ago, Kim Shook said:

 

@Captain – those crusty spuds look fantastic!  Exactly like I like them.  Would you share the method?

 

 

 

 

Thanks.  Nothing real special. I par boil to just under tender. Drain in a large colander and toss around to fluff them up a little. Veg oil S & P and into the oven.  Sometimes I'll shallow fry depending on timing.

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