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Dinner 2017 (Part 6)

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Inspired by this.   Although I feel like taking exception with the blogger’s claim that her recipe is only inspired by one from Ina Garten. It’s a pretty close copy. 

 

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 I made a couple of small changes. I added dried mustard to the sauce and scallions to the garnish. 

 

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 Such dishes rarely serve up looking as pretty as they do in their baking dish. 

 

Edited to say that I forgot the most important change I made. I did it in the Instant Pot. 


Edited by Anna N (log)
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32 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

I don't buy that for one minute.

 

I thought the wrapping up to make a tight parcel-pie would be difficult and that was the hardest part.  I tucked the final top layer of filo under as best I could but was afraid I would poke a hole in the dough.  One needs to work quickly so the FILO doesn’t dry out to crispy critters before one has a chance to tuck them in.  Actually it is a good dish for entertaining because all the components can be made ahead with final assembly just before guests arrive.

 

The friend on dessert knocked it out of the park with her chocolate macaroons.  They were crisp but very tender on the outside and deliciously soft on the inside with a middle layer of chocolate ganache.  She snuck them into the Moroccan theme sighting the French influence in the Cuisine.  Someone said better than any macaroon they had in Paris.

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Early dinner today was chili from a recipe that was a mystery for a while.  The note said I got it from Linda last month and I know it didn't come from my sister who is the only  Linda I know well enough to get a recipe, then i realized that my auto correct on the computer had "corrected "Lindag" to Linda. So thank you @lindag for the recipe.  

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Russian kotlety (flattened Kinda meatballs) with onion and peeper stew.  

 

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Cauliflower “fried rice” style with chicken and sugar snap peas. I boosted the flavor by dicing mushrooms and sauteeing them in a separate pan with onion powder until they gave up all of their liquid and dried out, they were more or less the same size as the grains of cauliflower. Kind of a brown dish, glad I had the snap peas for the color and sweetness.

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Pork cutlet, spiraled zucchini, and tomato sauce.

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7 hours ago, chefmd said:

Russian kotlety (flattened Kinda meatballs) with onion and peeper stew.  

 

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 Why do you call them Russian kotlety @chefmd? Is there any reason for that? We have the same in Poland and call them just "minced cutlets" (kotlety mielone) :)


Edited by Kasia (log)

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I made my first 'Family' pie tonight. First large pie I have attempted fully enclosed, usually if I do big I do a 'Pot Pie' style with a floating lid. To be honest, won't bother again, it took ages to cook! I think individual pies have more 'something' factor (not sure wow is what I mean but 'cute' seems wrong too o.O), they take less time to cook, I can just chuck the whole thing on a plate and they come with out the horrible feeling of hopelessness I have just discovered - there was absolutely no way I was going to manage to serve it in the neat little portions I had envisaged, nope it was going to be a big pile of pie filling with a lid 9_9

 

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Apart from this one little slice I reserved and (I'm not stubborn, you're stubborn) carefully piled up to look sort of like I had expected :laugh:

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3 hours ago, Kasia said:

 Why do you call them Russian kotlety @chefmd? Is there any reason for that? We have the same in Poland and call them just "minced cutlets" (kotlety mielone) :)

 

You are absolutely correct.  I should just call them kotlety.  They just remind me about growing up in Russia, grandma, youth and all that ;)

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2 hours ago, chefmd said:

You are absolutely correct.  I should just call them kotlety.  They just remind me about growing up in Russia, grandma, youth and all that ;)

 

My mother used to make them from her mother’s recipe and she called them kaklaten.  I have never been able to find that word anywhere so it must have been a family bastardization of kotlety, or possibly a variation from the old country. 

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Ann T's Honey Garlic Chicken again--I can't get enough of that stuff

 

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Pheasant and quail season opened this weekend.  Ronnie and Chum got several pheasants and one quail.  I fried and then pressure cooked the thighs,  hearts, gizzards and one breast.  The livers I just fried.  I'm going to experiment with the quail and a pheasant breast later this week.  The rest I will vac. pack and freeze.

 

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Apple pie for dessert.

 

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@mgaretzIs it possible that kaklaten is Yiddish or some variant thereof?  My father and grandmother would use terms that looked and sounded just like that..

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2 minutes ago, KennethT said:

@mgaretzIs it possible that kaklaten is Yiddish or some variant thereof?  My father and grandmother would use terms that looked and sounded just like that..

I think it's a Yiddish plural form. My father always wrapped meats in butcher paper and wrote on them in English lettering. I'd find packages that were labeled "kaklets," which I always thought was amusing. But the "en" is a German and Yiddish plural ending. Mensch, menschen, etc. So kaklat, kaklaten. Could be. 

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On ‎11‎/‎12‎/‎2017 at 9:31 AM, Anna N said:

Yeah me too but when I look on Amazon the quantities are such that I would have to eat biscuits every day and for every meal for the rest of my natural life to even come close to justifying such purchase. I did see the mix in a supermarket so I may be lucky enough to get back there and buy a single box. 

Costco has it in a not-too-crazy size

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2 minutes ago, gfweb said:

Costco has it in a not-too-crazy size

Thanks.  Don’t get to Costco too often and I think I have tracked down some in a local grocery store. Stay tuned.


Edited by Anna N (log)

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41 minutes ago, KennethT said:

@mgaretzIs it possible that kaklaten is Yiddish or some variant thereof?  My father and grandmother would use terms that looked and sounded just like that..

 

Entirely possible as both my sets of grandparents spoke Yiddish (primarily when they didn’t want us kids to know what they were saying - which was a shame as we never learned the language).

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2 hours ago, mgaretz said:

 

My mother used to make them from her mother’s recipe and she called them kaklaten.  I have never been able to find that word anywhere so it must have been a family bastardization of kotlety, or possibly a variation from the old country. 

The diminutive version is kotletky (plural) or kotletka (singular), pronounced with "a" katletky/katletka.  That sounds similar to kaklaten.  

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8 hours ago, chefmd said:

The diminutive version is kotletky (plural) or kotletka (singular), pronounced with "a" katletky/katletka.  That sounds similar to kaklaten.  

 

Of course the dish wasn’t just the meatballs (which were shaped more like a potato) but were cooked in and served with a dark onion broth with sliced onions, not unlike French onion soup.

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I thought I'd made this Copycat recipe for Shrimp Scampi before until I got into it and then I realized I hadn't.  I liked it but Charlie thought the previous one was better.

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Shrimp and sausage  pasta piquant with a cucumber and avocado salad.

HC

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Edited by HungryChris (log)
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5 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

I am sick of bread.

 

That's where Knoedel come in handy ...

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Tonight Flammkuchen (kind of) ... 35% rye, rest strong wheat. Poolish, 75% hydration. Topped with sour cream, egg yolk and Tetris de Moines mixture as well as various combinations. Bacon & mushrooms was good, as was chicken, tomato and pesto. 

Irvins Fried fish skins with salted egg yolk as starters and "Blutsbrüder" (cuvée, Rheinhessen) as the moistening agent ...

Made my parents happy, my son happy and me drunk - triple win xD

 

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