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Dinner 2017 (Part 6)

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Wow.  Nice pictorial.  Looks messy to eat but then most burgers are.

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18 minutes ago, Okanagancook said:

Looks messy to eat but then most burgers are.

I would volunteer to have this burger dripping down my chin. It looks wonderful.

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I would not hesitate to "clean" such mess as well:) 

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Tonight's dinner is All Day Beef Brisket slow cooking in the IP

The only change I made was to add a couple small cut up carrots.  

IT smells wonderful, will be ready in another three hours.

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Completely unorthodox I am sure. I was rereading One Good Dish by David Tanis. I recall being very disappointed when I first read this book. But going through it today I dog-eared many pages (relax it's a Kindle version).  And I came across his recipe for potatoes Anna.   Having never had much success with this dish in the past I had an urge to try it again and darn there was a potato sitting on the counter. 

 

 I used a faux mandoline to slice the potatoes and still have all of my digits with epidermis intact. I wore cut resistant gloves and held the potato in a clean towel.  I think the secret to success is cutting those potatoes almost paper thin.  

 

 But I also had leftover meatball tajia  and so I put the two of them together.  Orthodoxy is overrated. 

 

IMG_2117.thumb.JPG.bbbf37e032990557cbbb7819716bb931.JPG

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8 minutes ago, Anna N said:

Having never had much success with this dish in the past

Looks like success and then some. Those potatoes are beautiful.

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Last night we had mini beer-brats, made with chicken and Lagunitas IPA, an impulse buy from yesterday's Costco trip.  I pan-fried them.  They were pretty good.  Served with onion mashed potatoes,  raw snap peas and salad.

 

beer-brats.jpg.dee90157a74d3b4190b72d53b4351de0.jpg

 

 

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40 minutes ago, Anna N said:

Completely unorthodox I am sure. I was rereading One Good Dish by David Tanis. I recall being very disappointed when I first read this book. But going through it today I dog-eared many pages (relax it's a Kindle version).  And I came across his recipe for potatoes Anna.   Having never had much success with this dish in the past I had an urge to try it again and darn there was a potato sitting on the counter. 

 

 I used a faux mandoline to slice the potatoes and still have all of my digits with epidermis intact. I wore cut resistant gloves and held the potato in a clean towel.  I think the secret to success is cutting those potatoes almost paper thin.  

 

 But I also had leftover meatball tajia  and so I put the two of them together.  Orthodoxy is overrated. 

 

 

 

FAUX mandoline?

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42 minutes ago, Anna N said:

Completely unorthodox I am sure. I was rereading One Good Dish by David Tanis. I recall being very disappointed when I first read this book. But going through it today I dog-eared many pages (relax it's a Kindle version).  And I came across his recipe for potatoes Anna.   Having never had much success with this dish in the past I had an urge to try it again and darn there was a potato sitting on the counter. 

 

 I used a faux mandoline to slice the potatoes and still have all of my digits with epidermis intact. I wore cut resistant gloves and held the potato in a clean towel.  I think the secret to success is cutting those potatoes almost paper thin.  

 

 But I also had leftover meatball tajia  and so I put the two of them together.  Orthodoxy is overrated. 

 

IMG_2117.thumb.JPG.bbbf37e032990557cbbb7819716bb931.JPG

 

Great looking spuds.

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3 minutes ago, lindag said:

FAUX mandoline?

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44 minutes ago, Anna N said:

Completely unorthodox I am sure. I was rereading One Good Dish by David Tanis. I recall being very disappointed when I first read this book. But going through it today I dog-eared many pages (relax it's a Kindle version).  And I came across his recipe for potatoes Anna.   Having never had much success with this dish in the past I had an urge to try it again and darn there was a potato sitting on the counter. 

 

 I used a faux mandoline to slice the potatoes and still have all of my digits with epidermis intact. I wore cut resistant gloves and held the potato in a clean towel.  I think the secret to success is cutting those potatoes almost paper thin.  

 

 But I also had leftover meatball tajia  and so I put the two of them together.  Orthodoxy is overrated. 

 

IMG_2117.thumb.JPG.bbbf37e032990557cbbb7819716bb931.JPG

 

My Irish genes must be strong ones. I have yet to see a potato dish after which I do not lust. This one is no exception.

 

I can close my eyes and hear my grandmother directing me to go to the basement and bring her up six "arsh" potatoes. Not until much later did I realize she was saying "Irish." 

 

I'm making that potato pancake tomorrow. Possibly latkes as well. I may have a baked potato for dinner.

 

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1 minute ago, kayb said:

I'm making that potato pancake tomorrow. Possibly latkes as well. I may have a baked potato for dinner.

 There was a time that I thought potatoes had to be the most boring vegetable on earth.  Now I am much like you. I see a potato: I want a potato.xD

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3 hours ago, Anna N said:

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I have the de Buyer equivalent, which gets used as much as my three conventional mandolines put together. 

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Last night was steak night. I fetched these from the freezer. I bought them for their ideal size and marbling, on sale, some months back, and Debs's request for a steak night, this morning, brought them out to the light of day. They were as good as they looked. I had mine very rare and Deb's was her preferred med well,.............I always flinch when I hear her order med well at a restaurant, but  I can't say anything to you that I haven't already tried on her. I am just the frustrated servant! I also know that a well marbled steak is much better than a lean one, when cooked to death like that.

HC

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Edited by HungryChris (log)
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4 hours ago, Anna N said:

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I'd get the red one for camouflage.

 

Still it's hard to argue with the potatoes, anna or no.

 

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Ah, continuing with Bugialli and my trek around Sardinia:  Pesce alla Vernaccia, pp 180, 181.  Also the cover illustration.  Some of the best fish I have had, served with a bottle of Vermentino de Sardegna.  Fairly simple recipe.  The difficulty was sourcing the Vernaccia di Oristano.

 

The branzino is flavored by nothing more than salt, lemon zest, olives, and Vernaccia di Oristano.  I hate to think what this would cost in a restaurant.

 

But I must call shenanigans!  I'd like nothing better than to have Bugialli jump in here and explain my ignorance.  However let me explain:  there are two full page illustrations of this dish, the front cover and page 181.  It was not for a while I noticed these were not the same picture.  Both show the identical serving platter and the same background of the Roman sewage system.  (Sometimes Bugialli shares too much information.)  But the cover shows five fish and three wine glasses, while page 181 shows four fish and four wine glasses.  The cover shows whole black olives as called for in the recipe.  Page 181 shows pitted green olives, an anathema.  Plus the cover shows the poor fish sprinkled with some unspecified green stuff!

 

What's worse none of the nine fish show any trace of breading.  None.  Which is difficult to conceal with breaded fish.  If I had to guess I'd say Bugialli's fish are props.  Not cooked at all.  There I've said it.

 

My problem was that even in my large Falk pan the fish didn't nearly fit.  Oops.  Rather than turning the fish once as called for I had to scoot it around to get it cooked.  Yes I took pictures, but they were not the prettiest.

 

One can only eat and drink so much.  But I finished the fish.  I could not face the thought of leftovers.

 

I would not attempt this dish again till I had a larger pan or a smaller fish.  Not to mention more Vernaccia di Oristano.

 

 

 

Edit:  tonight's baguette was excellent.

 

 

 

 


Edited by JoNorvelleWalker (log)
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6 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

I'd get the red one for camouflage.

 

Still it's hard to argue with the potatoes, anna or no.

 

 Bought it long before I succumbed to the importance of red for both speed and efficiency. (Too many of us on this forum are old enough to have read Vance Packard).

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Not much time to ponder dinner menu these days with outside fall work when it's not raining and a heavier teaching load.

The Instant Pot has been my best friend.

From a frozen package of top sirloin steaks to Beef Curry (Patak Hot Curry paste), some Indian curry powder, carrots, onions, and a couple of potatoes, dinner was ready in an hour. The hardest part was cutting thru' the frozen steaks. I did throw them into the microwave "thaw" for a few minutes, which helped.

                                             59c8f109ab5ea_IPCurryBeef1119.jpg.2e8984d78cbf0d6e9b1bc8f8f059b562.jpg

 

 

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Too bad, my brisket that I slow cooked in the IP for 9 hours was still tough,  tonight I will PC it for another 10 mins. Or so to see if that helps.  Otherwise it's expensive dog food.

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I had a craving for roast chicken.  Well actually if the truth be told it was really  a craving for

mashed potatoes and gravy.

 

59c9354f435f1_RoastChickenDinnerSeptember24th2017.thumb.jpg.22119b99c3bcf2e08af0ad2f91573a07.jpg

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3 hours ago, lindag said:

Otherwise it's expensive dog food.

Oh, don't do that, unless you really love your dog. Chop it up in the food processor and make some good roast beef hash. Or you could chop it and make a really good bolognese sauce. How about tacos, burritos or enchiladas.

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To take advantage of the beautiful weather on Saturday we took our early dinner upstairs

IMG_20170923_164429754.thumb.jpg.9183e65743344476ab814eda8572def4.jpg

Stirfried beans with pork, cabbage with pepper, and tomato mozz salad. Instead of the classic rice we tried millet. I may have overcooked a bit but the nutty flavour worked well.

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