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Toliver

Snacking while eGulleting... (Part 3)

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On 7/7/2018 at 12:59 AM, liuzhou said:

Fresh 毛豆 (máo dòu) or edamame boiled in sea salted water for five minutes, drained, let cool and sprinkled with more sea salt (because they needed it).

 

edamame1.thumb.jpg.23a456c683724098a5ebcb4be940ecce.jpg

 

edamame.jpg.e3083cf9c919a31844c3dde980511caa.jpg

 

I could eat my weight in these things.

 

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Haagen-Dazs coffee ice cream, on sale.  Maybe it's just me but I think they've seriously watered down the formula since the olden days.  Haagen-Dazs used to be hard and creamy.  Now it's icy and melts fast.

 

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Debating here or Dinner.....

Fritos scoops, chopped black olives, leftover taco sauce and green chili sauce with some grated aged Cabot cheese.

Listening to D& D on NJ 101.5; my Friday 6 pm indulgence.   Name 5 tonight....

 

next time spray the plain foil...or use non-stick


Edited by suzilightning (log)
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On ‎7‎/‎11‎/‎2018 at 5:51 PM, kayb said:

I could eat my weight in these things.

 

I grew up in the MS Delta. Abutting our acre  on one side was a field of soybeans (the other 3 were cotton). If we'd known how delicious these were then, we'd have been our stripping those plants on a daily basis! 

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6 hours ago, caroled said:

I grew up in the MS Delta. Abutting our acre  on one side was a field of soybeans (the other 3 were cotton). If we'd known how delicious these were then, we'd have been our stripping those plants on a daily basis! 

It's my understanding the edible soybeans are a different variety. There are some Delta growers that grow them, though.

 

 

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2 hours ago, kayb said:

It's my understanding the edible soybeans are a different variety. There are some Delta growers that grow them, though.

 

 

So what's been raised with the intent of becoming soybean oil and soy meal is not edible in it's green, undried state? I never knew.

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, caroled said:

So what's been raised with the intent of becoming soybean oil and soy meal is not edible in it's green, undried state? I never knew.

 

 

I suppose it's edible. I'm told the edible varieties are preferred.

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13 hours ago, caroled said:

I grew up in the MS Delta. Abutting our acre  on one side was a field of soybeans (the other 3 were cotton). If we'd known how delicious these were then, we'd have been our stripping those plants on a daily basis! 

 

6 hours ago, kayb said:

It's my understanding the edible soybeans are a different variety. There are some Delta growers that grow them, though.

 

 

I've walked our soybeans many times and snacked.  They are good to me :) and they are made into oil etc.

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On 7/14/2018 at 5:35 PM, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Haagen-Dazs coffee ice cream, on sale.  Maybe it's just me but I think they've seriously watered down the formula since the olden days.  Haagen-Dazs used to be hard and creamy.  Now it's icy and melts fast.

 

It seems many (though Ben & Jerry's has not totally fallen flat) companies have introduced more and more 'aeration' into their processing to increase volume of the product while keeping costs down.

 

My beloved Kawartha Dairy, while direct from the large tubs in their outlets is still fantastic, their retail packaged 1-2L have been hit by the same greed stick.

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3 hours ago, TicTac said:

It seems many (though Ben & Jerry's has not totally fallen flat) companies have introduced more and more 'aeration' into their processing to increase volume of the product while keeping costs down.

 

My beloved Kawartha Dairy, while direct from the large tubs in their outlets is still fantastic, their retail packaged 1-2L have been hit by the same greed stick.

 

Sadly to my taste Ben & Jerry's is over sweetened and over flavored.  I confess I have not tried Ben & Jerry's in years.  Maybe they are due another chance.  Particularly since they once bought one of my company's cameras for research back in the last millennium.

 

If I could source good cream locally I'd be making my own ice cream.  The Shoprite ultra pasteurized cream I can obtain is stringy and gross.  Reminds me of blood clots.

 

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7 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Sadly to my taste Ben & Jerry's is over sweetened and over flavored.  I confess I have not tried Ben & Jerry's in years.  Maybe they are due another chance.  Particularly since they once bought one of my company's cameras for research back in the last millennium.

 

If I could source good cream locally I'd be making my own ice cream.  The Shoprite ultra pasteurized cream I can obtain is stringy and gross.  Reminds me of blood clots.

 

Send 'em a letter. Tell them they need to do a special run of "Blood Clots" ice cream for Halloween, using Shoprite ultra pasteurized cream. :P

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Home made Scotch quail egg. Spicy mango relish.

 

378241368_scotchegg.thumb.jpg.62ce85a7110aae775e5046ed93b676ef.jpg

 

You don't really think I only ate one, do you?

 

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Every couple of years I get a slight craving for these. I hear they are mostly a Canadian thing, and maybe Lay's make the best ones. I had a small bag today and definitely don't need to do it again for another year or two. 

 

IMG_20180723_124627.thumb.jpg.fa718170a9d963f5c4bcbdfb40d4109d.jpg

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2 minutes ago, FauxPas said:

Every couple of years I get a slight craving for these. I hear they are mostly a Canadian thing, and maybe Lay's make the best ones. I had a small bag today and definitely don't need to do it again for another year or two. 

 

IMG_20180723_124627.thumb.jpg.fa718170a9d963f5c4bcbdfb40d4109d.jpg

 We appear to be in the land of old Dutch as we see the truck going from place to place!

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prawns.thumb.jpg.86a45735e19d1915ea331030c3382c2a.jpg

Salt and (Sichuan) Pepper Prawns

 

As ever, I choose my nomenclature carefully. They are prawns, not shrimp. There is a difference. Whatever, they were alive when they hit the wok. Cooked shell on and with the tastiest part - the heads. You know it makes sense.

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Are they crispy enough to crunch shell and all? My family looks a me askance when I eat the ends ( swimmerets ) whenever I happen to have fried shrimp if we are dining out. I only like them if they are really crispy.

 

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1 hour ago, caroled said:

Are they crispy enough to crunch shell and all? My family looks a me askance when I eat the ends ( swimmerets ) whenever I happen to have fried shrimp if we are dining out. I only like them if they are really crispy.

 

 

Yes, you can eat shell and all, although I tend just to bite into the heads, then discard. But the body, I eat all. Most people here do the same.

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Homemade bread drizzled with olive oil. Topped with a slice of industrial ham, a slice of tomato, a basil leaf, sea salt and white pepper.

 

hs1.thumb.JPG.ac6d8203f1901c452829248f6b6c98cb.JPG

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LOL,  almost looks like my eyes during allergy season.  Yup, they're green but point in the same direction I hope.

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On 7/23/2018 at 3:55 PM, FauxPas said:

Every couple of years I get a slight craving for these. I hear they are mostly a Canadian thing, and maybe Lay's make the best ones. I had a small bag today and definitely don't need to do it again for another year or two. 

 

IMG_20180723_124627.thumb.jpg.fa718170a9d963f5c4bcbdfb40d4109d.jpg

 

We took our (then 7 year old) daughter to a factory tour of Herr’s potato chips.  They had ketchup chips for sale and she wanted to try them.  She fell in love with them, sadly they are as scarce as hens teeth around where we lived, and live.  Friends of ours took their grandchildren to the same tour recently.  We asked them to get us a bag.....and when we saw her two weeks ago, as she was presented with a bag of Herr’s potato chips, well, let’s just say that her inner 7 year old came bounding out.....

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Favorite chips:

20180730_150449.thumb.jpg.6de05bb9c722c689b6012db550c5b59c.jpg

I prefer the plain. With s good creamy cheese.

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You have to be careful buying eggs round here. These make look like regular eggs to you.

 

pidan1.thumb.jpg.ad1b637d17a385ea10e97e1b0d5f3c6c.jpg

 

but shell them to find these - 皮蛋 (pí dàn) aka century eggs, preserved eggs, hundred-year eggs, thousand-year eggs, thousand-year-old eggs, millennium eggs, skin eggs orblack eggs.

 

pidan2.thumb.jpg.65997b56977a0bbcf4671aef23b8327f.jpg

 

Here served with chilli sauce.

pidan3.thumb.jpg.c309b68395ff6750969f9dd263ff50b0.jpg

 

Delicious.

 

P.S. The easiest way to tell if they are pidan or fresh eggs  (assuming you can't read the Chinese on the signs) is that fresh eggs are sold by weight, whereas these are sold by the unit. ¥1.50/个 (¥1.50 each ) or 22 cents US; 17 pence UK.


Edited by liuzhou (log)
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5 hours ago, liuzhou said:

蛋 (pí dàn) aka century eggs, preserved eggs

 For some reason I was thinking about these overnight. No idea what brought them to mind. Can you describe their taste and texture? I know that’s probably asking a lot.

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1 minute ago, Anna N said:

 For some reason I was thinking about these overnight. No idea what brought them to mind. Can you describe their taste and texture? I know that’s probably asking a lot.

 

Not asking a lot. I've been asked a thousand times, so the answer is well rehearsed.

They simply taste like very eggy eggs. Supercharged eggs. The texture is slightly gelatinous like what I understand is known as "Jello" in your part of the planet. These were duck eggs, but they are also made from chicken and quail eggs.

I like them a lot. With chilli as here, or with a soy-vinegar dip or straight.

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