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ElainaA

Slow Roasted Cherry Tomato Sauce

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Porthos   

I'm going to give this a try with two substitutions.  Cherry tomatoes are hard to come by at a good price but I can get Romas at a good price most of the time so Romas will be the tomato. I'm going to sub out rosemary from my plant for basil since my DW doesn't care for basil.

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ElainaA   
5 hours ago, Porthos said:

I'm going to give this a try with two substitutions.  Cherry tomatoes are hard to come by at a good price but I can get Romas at a good price most of the time so Romas will be the tomato. I'm going to sub out rosemary from my plant for basil since my DW doesn't care for basil.

If you are using Romas I would chop them. And if using rosemary in place of the basil I would use less - rosemary can easily be overpowering. What about oregano? 

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Shelby   
18 hours ago, Paul Bacino said:

Wish there was a way to de skin.. these babies?

I feel you.  For what it's worth, a lot of them fall off during the roasting process and I pick them out.

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TdeV   

My casserole looked the same as others on this thread, but I've got to say: these slow roasted tomatoes are absolutely fabulous! If you haven't tried this, you wouldn't know how out of this world they are.

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Smithy   

Incidentally, this recipe is also brilliant with large tomatoes, cut into smaller chunks.  This is what I did with a surfeit of Beefsteak and Early Girl tomatoes: 

 

20170817_190326.jpg

 

...and no, I did not bother peeling them. :P

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31 minutes ago, Smithy said:

Incidentally, this recipe is also brilliant with large tomatoes, cut into smaller chunks.  This is what I did with a surfeit of Beefsteak and Early Girl tomatoes: 

Thanks for that report.  I've been wondering if that would work as well as the little fellas.

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Smithy   
2 hours ago, blue_dolphin said:

Thanks for that report.  I've been wondering if that would work as well as the little fellas.

 

I think there's a bit more juice with the big boys, and the texture is a bit different because it starts with chunks instead of intact orbs, but it's still very, very good.

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Shelby   

I've got to convert all of you non-peelers.

 

 

:ph34r:

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Smithy   

I used this same approach with a mixed bag of peppers of all heats.  A few onions, a bit of garlic, and some tomatoes went into the mix.  Very tasty, very aromatic, and very versatile.  (Nothing was peeled except the garlic, @Shelby :P) i'd post a photo, but (a) I didn't take one and (b) it doesn't look very different from my last picture from this topic. It tastes, different, though: aHOOA! there are some hot peppers in my mix!

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When/if I get a working oven, I am so trying this recipe. I can even do it with Camparis which have become a go to tomato after several disappointing deviations from them this summer, including expensive "heirloom" lookalikes that were juicy but flavorless. Camparis are usually available through winter here now.

 

@Shelby, It would be much easier to peel larger good garden tomatoes like Smithy used if you wanted to use peeled. Do you blanch them in boiling water like I'm used to for canning or use another method?

 

Peels usually don't bother me at all, especially in salads, but when you want a smooth tomato sauce, it's best to get rid of the peels.

 

P.S.:  Garden pics would be much appreciated by me and probably the community. :) pet pics, on and on ...

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Shelby   
8 hours ago, Thanks for the Crepes said:

When/if I get a working oven, I am so trying this recipe. I can even do it with Camparis which have become a go to tomato after several disappointing deviations from them this summer, including expensive "heirloom" lookalikes that were juicy but flavorless. Camparis are usually available through winter here now.

 

@Shelby, It would be much easier to peel larger good garden tomatoes like Smithy used if you wanted to use peeled. Do you blanch them in boiling water like I'm used to for canning or use another method?

 

Peels usually don't bother me at all, especially in salads, but when you want a smooth tomato sauce, it's best to get rid of the peels.

 

P.S.:  Garden pics would be much appreciated by me and probably the community. :) pet pics, on and on ...

OH yes, when ever I peel large amounts of tomatoes, I always blanch first :) 

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ElsieD   

I finally made this and it's delicious.  I did take the skins off all 95 of the little suckers before pureeing the sauce.  I used some of it on a pizza last night and still have quite a bit left.  Some of the tomatoes were of a size not much bigger than a thumbnail.  Next time I'll use bigger tomatoes.

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Porthos   

I was looking forward to trying this but the market I was going to get the Romas from hasn't  had good prices lately and I going into my fall ren faire season. Not a lot of spare time for the next 7 weeks.

 

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FWIW, if you don't want to deal with skins, even slow roasting already canned tomatoes greatly improves their flavor. Buy whole peeled tomatoes in cans, cut them in half and remove the stem, roast cut side up and then use as you normally would. 

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FWIW, from a couple of my previous posts here and on other forums in the past:

 

""I switched to this method long ago because I got tired of processing tomatoes in a super-hot late summer kitchen.
Zero-heat tomato water and conserva.
Wash tomatoes thoroughly (preferably a well flavored roma-type, like Martino's Roma or Opalka, but any tomato will work.)
Place tomatoes on sheet pan and freeze solid.
Remove tomatoes from freezer and run under a slow steady stream of cold water, the skins will easily slip off.
Very coarsely chop the semi-frozen tomatoes (3/4" sized pieces) and place in a cheesecloth or muslim lined colander overnight or until they stop draining. The resulting tomato water will be quite clear.
Run the tomato remains through a food mill to remove the seeds. This is a snap because the freezing does a very good job of breaking down the tomato flesh. The resulting conserva should be thick enough so that a wooden spoon will stand up in it.
I then freeze the conserva or further process it.
This requires some planning ahead, but it produces some very nice tomato water and conserva without a lot of fuss or heat!!!

The easiest way to reduce it even further if you wish is to spread the conserva thin, say a half an inch thick, on large surface area pans in a very slow oven....stir every 15-20 minutes until it reaches the desired consistency."

 

Now I'm interest in trying it, partially, with some Juliet tomatoes sometime!

I would just remove skins as above, add the additional ingredients and 'roast' or reduce in the oven

 

:)

 

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