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andiesenji

andiesenji

I use them fresh all the time.  I have two huge bay "bushes" which were supposed to be "dwarf" and not grow taller than 8 feet.

Ha!  I have had then trimmed when they reached 20' and again near that.

The aroma and flavor is exceptional.  One is a true Laurus Nobilis and the other is a Canary Island Laurus variant but has similar flavor and aroma.  Both were given to me by a friend who worked at the Huntington Gardens when I first moved up here in 1988.

I pick leaves and put them in a wire colander on my kitchen counter until they are completely dry and then I vac seal them and send them to friends.  

They are evergreen so I have a supply of fresh leaves all year although the aroma and flavor is strongest in the late spring. 

I lightly crush two or three leaves to simmer in milk or cream for a custard base - or when I want to make a cream sauce for vegetables.  The flavor is exquisite.  

 

I also save the straight stems when I prune the bushes and use them for skewers and they too impart flavor to meats, chicken, vegetables, etc.

 

The original "trunk" is behind the oldest scions. it is more than 8 inches in diameter just above the ground.

When first planted it was barely an inch in diameter.

5946b7ee86995_ScreenShot2017-06-18at10_17_36AM.thumb.png.faeddb994306e310ad37a0d0d07ec655.png

 

This one has again reached 20' in height and is in the branches of the shade tree.

5946b81fb963e_ScreenShot2017-06-18at10_17_00AM.thumb.png.78bdac5342e10931ff52d05aab14aa20.png

 

This is the Canary Island variant - which was not supposed to survive our winters at this altitude (2800 ft) and the hard freezes but it has survived temps down to 5°F.  Although I protected both the first few years.  

You can see that the leaves are slightly lighter, a bit more yellow in the green and they have "hairy" flower clusters. 

They also produce a lot of very large leaves.  

5946b85218a64_ScreenShot2017-06-18at10_17_18AM.thumb.png.44fc9a59da1cc65452d000251bbc0456.png

 

andiesenji

andiesenji

I use them fresh all the time.  I have two huge bay "bushes" which were supposed to be "dwarf" and not grow taller than 8 feet.

Ha!  I have had then trimmed when they reached 20' and again near that.

The aroma and flavor is exceptional.  One is a true Laurus Nobilis and the other is a Canary Island Laurus variant but has similar flavor and aroma.  Both were given to me by a friend who worked at the Huntington Gardens when I first moved up here in 1988.

I pick leaves and put them in a wire colander on my kitchen counter until they are completely dry and then I vac seal them and send them to friends.  

They are evergreen so I have a supply of fresh leaves all year although the aroma and flavor is strongest in the late spring. 

I lightly crush two or three leaves to simmer in milk or cream for a custard base - or when I want to make a cream sauce for vegetables.  The flavor is exquisite.  

The original "trunk" is behind the oldest scions.

5946b7ee86995_ScreenShot2017-06-18at10_17_36AM.thumb.png.faeddb994306e310ad37a0d0d07ec655.png

 

This one has again reached 20' in height and is in the branches of the shade tree.

5946b81fb963e_ScreenShot2017-06-18at10_17_00AM.thumb.png.78bdac5342e10931ff52d05aab14aa20.png

 

This is the Canary Island variant - which was not supposed to survive our winters at this altitude (2800 ft) and the hard freezes but it has survived temps down to 5°F.  Although I protected both the first few years.  

You can see that the leaves are slightly lighter, a bit more yellow in the green and they have "hairy" flower clusters. 

They also produce a lot of very large leaves.  

5946b85218a64_ScreenShot2017-06-18at10_17_18AM.thumb.png.44fc9a59da1cc65452d000251bbc0456.png

 

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