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Instant Pot. Multi-function cooker (Part 5)


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@Kim Shook - so you did all steps as before, except 4 minutes rather than 5?

On 4/9/2020 at 10:24 AM, Kim Shook said:

This was a cup of cool water, 5 minutes LOW pressure, fast release.  Then 30 seconds cold water bath, 5 seconds under cold running water and back into the water bath for 3 minutes.  Not sure that back and forth between the water bath and running water is necessary, but - like I said before - why argue with success?  I think I'll try 4 minutes next time.  

 

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If one is cooking a dish (high pressure) in the Instant Pot where the chicken will take 10 minutes but the brown rice will take 22 minutes (using pot-in-pot), does one cook the rice 12 minutes, open the pot, sauté the chicken, close the pot, cook another 10 minutes at high pressure?

 

If not that, then what?

 

And the 10 minutes rest, does that happen on the first cook cycle and the second cook cycle?

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3 hours ago, TdeV said:

If one is cooking a dish (high pressure) in the Instant Pot where the chicken will take 10 minutes but the brown rice will take 22 minutes (using pot-in-pot), does one cook the rice 12 minutes, open the pot, sauté the chicken, close the pot, cook another 10 minutes at high pressure?

 

 

There were too many disasters to have meaningful data about this. The plan was Urvashi Pitre's Butter Chicken. I did start with just the rice for 10 minutes high pressure, stop it, no slow release. Then I put in the cut up boneless chicken et al. Then up to pressure again but for some reason the pot kept spurting steam and never went under pressure. I cancelled the program, looked at the vent to see if food was stuck, and started up again–only for 6 minutes high pressure this time.

 

DH thought dinner was good, I thought it was merely okay.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Corned Beef lovers I need your help.  My IP results have been dry, and I hate dry meat.

I’m using high pressure.  Do you use high or low, and what time has produced the most moist meat?

How can you govern a country which has 246 varieties of cheese?

Charles De Gaulle, in "Les Mots du General", 1962

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, md8232 said:

Corned Beef lovers I need your help.  My IP results have been dry, and I hate dry meat.

I’m using high pressure.  Do you use high or low, and what time has produced the most moist meat?


My best ever results come from slow- cooking corned beef.

And, no, I don’t use my iPot for that; my crockpot does a better job with just the right temperature.  The resuly]take are simply amazing.

Edited by lindag (log)
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10 minutes ago, md8232 said:

Corned Beef lovers I need your help.  My IP results have been dry, and I hate dry meat.

I’m using high pressure.  Do you use high or low, and what time has produced the most moist meat?


I largely follow this recipe.

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51 minutes ago, md8232 said:

Corned Beef lovers I need your help.  My IP results have been dry, and I hate dry meat.

I’m using high pressure.  Do you use high or low, and what time has produced the most moist meat?


 

Instant Pot Corned Beef Brisket
 
3 lb. Corned Beef Brisket
4 cups Beef Broth
1 stalk of celery, cut in two
1 half onion, sliced
Seasoning pack from corned beef
 
Soak brisket in water for one hour, then rinse and pat dry
 
Cut brisket into 3 or 4 even pieces to fit in pot
Place all ingredients in the Instant Pot in order listed above
Set on MANUAL High Pressure for 75 minutes
Natural release pressure for 20 minutes
Quick release remaining pressure
 
Remove celery and discard; move brisket to a baking dish and spoon on a bit of cooking liquid, cover with foil - let rest for 15 minutes
 
While the brisket is resting, cook the following vegetables in cooking liquid...
 
3 medium potatoes, peeled and chunked
3 carrots, peeled and chunked
1/2 cabbage, cored and cut into wedges
 
...for 5 minutes at high pressure with quick release.
 
Slice brisket against the grain and serve with the vegetables.
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2 hours ago, lindag said:


My best ever results come from slow- cooking corned beef.

And, no, I don’t use my iPod for that; my crockpot does a better job with just the right temperature.  The resuly]take are simply amazing.

 

Thanks, but my crockpot has a crack.  I’m hoping to use the IP in some fashion and

not replace the crockpot.

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How can you govern a country which has 246 varieties of cheese?

Charles De Gaulle, in "Les Mots du General", 1962

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Just now, md8232 said:

 

Thanks, but my crockpot has a crack.  I’m hoping to use the IP in some fashion and

not replace the crockpot.

 

Your IP has a slow cooker mode, use "high" to get a crockpot temp.  That said, I sous vide my corned beef after an overnight soak with a few water changes.  180F for 6-8 hours.

Mark

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On 3/10/2020 at 2:01 PM, Kim Shook said:

I realize that my results probably have more to do with the eggs than the method of cooking.

It has everything to do with the method of cooking. I wish I could find the article that I read by an eminent food scientist that explained it so simply. Cooking eggs underwater causes the membrane, especially in fresh eggs, to fuse to the egg. Streaming the eggs causes the membrane to fuse to the shell.

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9 hours ago, mgaretz said:

 

Your IP has a slow cooker mode, use "high" to get a crockpot temp.  That said, I sous vide my corned beef after an overnight soak with a few water changes.  180F for 6-8 hours.

 

Thanks.  I pulled some duck legs from the Sous Vide today.  It’s good to options.

How can you govern a country which has 246 varieties of cheese?

Charles De Gaulle, in "Les Mots du General", 1962

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  • 3 weeks later...

I did BBQ (sauce) tenderloin tonight.  One and one-half pound tenderloin.  One cup water, one cup BBQ sauce.  I added some seasonings.  I did it for 25 minutes.  Out of the IP and seared with a torch:

IMG_2377.jpg.596f6497100065e9b3214790f311eb6e.jpg

 

Sliced:

IMG_2378.jpg.efc03fab5abf1566eedd1ca49c360221.jpg

 

Mr. Kim found it very dry.  I agreed that it was a bit dry, but still tasty.  Does it look overdone?  Any advice?  Did I cook it too long?  I stupidly forgot to get a temp.  I'd really like to do this again - it was so easy.  Or do I just give up on doing such a lean cut of meat IP and go with SV?  Thanks!

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Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, Kim Shook said:

I did BBQ (sauce) tenderloin tonight.  One and one-half pound tenderloin.  One cup water, one cup BBQ sauce.  I added some seasonings.  I did it for 25 minutes.  Out of the IP and seared with a torch:

IMG_2377.jpg.596f6497100065e9b3214790f311eb6e.jpg

 

Sliced:

IMG_2378.jpg.efc03fab5abf1566eedd1ca49c360221.jpg

 

Mr. Kim found it very dry.  I agreed that it was a bit dry, but still tasty.  Does it look overdone?  Any advice?  Did I cook it too long?  I stupidly forgot to get a temp.  I'd really like to do this again - it was so easy.  Or do I just give up on doing such a lean cut of meat IP and go with SV?  Thanks!

When I've cooked a pork loin roast, after searing the outside, I do IP manual, high, natural release, cook time 35-38 minutes.  (I use  a packaged roast, cut in half, and depending on which 1/2 I'm cooking determines the timing. One end being the leaner whiter meat/ 35  minutes... the end with the redder meat when cooking I go for 38. ) 

For a lean piece that size, I'd suggest starting at 18-19 minutes. 

Edited by caroled (log)
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And this old porch is like a steaming greasy plate of enchiladas,With lots of cheese and onions and a guacamole salad ...This Old Porch...Lyle Lovett

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10 hours ago, Kim Shook said:

I did BBQ (sauce) tenderloin tonight.  One and one-half pound tenderloin.  One cup water, one cup BBQ sauce.  I added some seasonings.  I did it for 25 minutes.  Out of the IP and seared with a torch:

 

Mr. Kim found it very dry.  I agreed that it was a bit dry, but still tasty.  Does it look overdone?  Any advice?  Did I cook it too long?  I stupidly forgot to get a temp.  I'd really like to do this again - it was so easy.  Or do I just give up on doing such a lean cut of meat IP and go with SV?  Thanks!

 

Kim, when I was developing recipes for pork tenderloin in the IP, I found that it's possible to do it a couple of different ways, depending on what else (if anything) I was cooking with it. But it takes an amazingly short time to cook under pressure. (I almost always sear first, so take that into account.) I have one recipe in Instant Pot Obsession where I cook it with cabbage and noodles, so after searing and lightly browning the vegetables, I added liquid and noodles, and cooked for 4 minutes low pressure, because that's what i use for noodles. That was with quick release. If I'm just doing the tenderloin on its own, I sometimes cook it for even less time, but let the pressure release naturally for 8 minutes or so. The other thing to note is that I generally get tenderloins that are a bit smaller -- more like 1.25 pounds, and I cut them in half to get two shorter pieces because I find they fit better in the pot.

 

Pork loin, of course, is a different cut and takes different timing. I found it much trickier than tenderloin.

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I also remember a Cook's Ill.method of cooking pork tenderloins I tried once that really worked well. Of course, CI is behind a pay wall, but sometimes their recipes may be found on other sites, especially public broadcasting sites.

 

https://www.kcet.org/shows/americas-test-kitchen-from-cooks-illustrated/recipe-perfect-pan-seared-pork-tenderloin-steaks 

 

This'll take longer, but worth it, in my opinion.

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1 hour ago, weinoo said:

To my taste, tenderloins are best cooked on stove top, as I don’t think any time is saved with a pressure cooker.  And even then precariously.

I really think that I agree with you.  My favorite way of doing them is to sear them in a cast iron skillet and then roast in the oven for a few minutes.  I was really just hoping that using the IP would infuse the BBQ sauce into the meat.  

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28 minutes ago, Kim Shook said:

I really think that I agree with you.  My favorite way of doing them is to sear them in a cast iron skillet and then roast in the oven for a few minutes.  I was really just hoping that using the IP would infuse the BBQ sauce into the meat.  

The reverse of the reverse sear (which is that CI method linked above).

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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6 hours ago, weinoo said:

To my taste, tenderloins are best cooked on stove top, as I don’t think any time is saved with a pressure cooker.  And even then precariously.

 

Probably, but the question was not about the best way to cook pork tenderloin, it was about how to cook it in the Instant Pot. Regardless of whether or not you or I think it's a good idea, people are going to cook pork tenderloin in their pressure cookers. They might as well learn how to do it to obtain the best results.

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Posted (edited)
47 minutes ago, Dave the Cook said:

 

Probably, but the question was not about the best way to cook pork tenderloin, it was about how to cook it in the Instant Pot. Regardless of whether or not you or I think it's a good idea, people are going to cook pork tenderloin in their pressure cookers. They might as well learn how to do it to obtain the best results.

Or maybe they should learn that it's a much better end product, cooked properly on the stove top.  
 

Or maybe if they insist on using the IP, they'll learn different cuts work better under those conditions.

 

And what better place for them to learn those things than here on eGullet?

Edited by weinoo (log)
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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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7 hours ago, weinoo said:

I was really just hoping that using the IP would infuse the BBQ sauce into the meat.  

 I have cooked several things in barbecue sauce in the IP, little ribs, pieces of pork belly, and pulled pork. I have found that the thing that makes the flavor pop is to coat them with a thin layer of barbecue sauce and pop them under the broiler for a few minutes. It should work with a roast.

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4 hours ago, Dave the Cook said:

 

Probably, but the question was not about the best way to cook pork tenderloin, it was about how to cook it in the Instant Pot. Regardless of whether or not you or I think it's a good idea, people are going to cook pork tenderloin in their pressure cookers. They might as well learn how to do it to obtain the best results.

This begs the question how best to scramble an egg in an abelskiver pan.   Sure, one can imagine and suggest a number of off-product suggestions, but might it also be as helpful to suggest a different pan? 

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