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Okanagancook

Instant Pot. Multi-function cooker (Part 5)

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My wife requested deviled eggs for tomorrow. Of course, I used the IP. I usually do 1 cup water, 5 minutes, then 6 minute before I release. I forgot to do the release until the 17 minute mark. 

 

Oops. Hopefully, I don't have green yolks.


That's the thing about opposum inerds, they's just as tasty the next day.

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20 minutes ago, chileheadmike said:

My wife requested deviled eggs for tomorrow. Of course, I used the IP. I usually do 1 cup water, 5 minutes, then 6 minute before I release. I forgot to do the release until the 17 minute mark. 

 

Oops. Hopefully, I don't have green yolks.

On low?  If on low, I've done that and they are ok :) 

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20 minutes ago, Shelby said:

On low?  If on low, I've done that and they are ok :) 

Of course not. High all the way.

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That's the thing about opposum inerds, they's just as tasty the next day.

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Actually, they were fine. A thin layer that was off color but not green and not bad at all. 

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That's the thing about opposum inerds, they's just as tasty the next day.

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I made @mgaretz's recipe for cabbage soup last night (put off from Wednesday).  Very, very good.  I do love cabbage.

It's quite different from the recipe I usually use which was my Mother's.

Hers uses pork (usually country style ribs) and beef broth instead of the tomato/sauce combo.

It also has potatoes and sometime rutabaga.   It's a favorite nostalgic recipe of mine.

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the ATK cookbook factory is running at full steam :

 

http://www.syndetics.com/index.aspx?client=minuteman&isbn=1948703068/summary.html&type=rn12

 

and

 

934042094_TKmed.jpg.b9f492f791acc96eee9056592f329257.jpg

 

I don't know it the list on the R in in published order.  I do know the " Bowls " book is new

 

have the but on reserve at my local lib system.

 

for an Industrial Operation that Poo-Poo'd  iPot initially , insisting on a conventional

 

PCooker , they did smell the money !

 

and that's not the criticism that it seems.  the books are well laid out

 

the graphics inviting etc   so if they get you in the Kitchen ,

 

and you checked them out from you library  

 

why not ?

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@rotuts - thanks for the heads up.  Not available yet at my library, but I put a hold on it for when they get it.  

 

Got a craving for some pasta the other day.  It was too late to do anything but IP, so I decided to play around with the recipe that I made a while back that was fine, but not great.  I added tomato paste, actual onion and garlic (as opposed to powder) and Penzey’s Tuscan Sunset herb mix.  Much, much better than before:

DSCN0564.JPG.bd0cb20700434c824d1a738da41beb01.JPG

 

DSCN0565.JPG.8a763daaf9e23576de7b8b24ba2ee7bc.JPG

Could I do better making the whole thing from scratch with no shortcuts?  Sure.  But this was really good and took about 35 minutes total. 

 

For New Year’s day dinner I did two things in the IP – collards and black eyed peas.  I’d done the collards before (I doubt I’ll ever cook them any other way), but this was the first time for black eyed peas.  I did them basically the same way I do pintos – onion, garlic, bacon grease (Benton’s), chicken stock, etc. – 30 minutes pressure and 20 natural release.  They maintain their integrity while being tender and creamy.  We loved them:

DSCN0572.JPG.755298d71bf9ef728ba33589c32d5d1b.JPG

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44 minutes ago, Kim Shook said:

For New Year’s day dinner I did two things in the IP – collards and black eyed peas

Kim, I won't do either of those any other way either.  I did the BEP's for the first time (I think) in there--I added a ham hock and some tomatoes.  Like you said the beans were so creamy and good!

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It doesn't show up on amazon.ca

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, mgaretz said:

Same concept as the Ninja Foodie. 

 

@ElsieD noted the Mealthy lid to do the same thing, in this post last June. I think the questions raised about the need to shake the basket contents, and how one would go about it with an Instant Pot, are still good questions.

 

How DOES that work for the Ninja Foodie? That is, does the Ninja Foodie require basket shaking - and if so, how difficult is it?


Edited by Smithy Clarification (log)

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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Here's a (maybe silly) question:

If the plan is to make a dish with both dried beans and chickpeas (both unsoaked), should one do them separately in the Instant Pot, or together?

According to x's (via @blue_dolphin) cooking times for Rancho Gordo beans in the Instant Pot,

Chickpeas (Garbanzo) need 32-35 minutes on high pressure

Cabellero need 10-12 if soaked, which for unsoaked I extrapolate to mean 20-22 minutes on high pressure.

 

So, do I do Chickpeas 10 minutes, quick release, add Cabellero and and do 20 more minutes (or maybe 18 to be safe)?

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On 1/3/2020 at 1:02 PM, Kim Shook said:

@rotuts For New Year’s day dinner I did two things in the IP – collards and black eyed peas.  I’d done the collards before (I doubt I’ll ever cook them any other way), ...

 

On 1/3/2020 at 1:48 PM, Shelby said:

Kim, I won't do either of those any other way either.  I did the BEP's for the first time (I think) in there--I added a ham hock and some tomatoes.  Like you said the beans were so creamy and good!

 

Please tell me why collards in an IP are special. And how do you cook them?

 

Kim and Shelby, you two are so alike--a joy to watch! And thanks so much for your endless supply of lovely photos. Sorry, rotuts, I couldn't edit you out of the quote.

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1 hour ago, TdeV said:

Here's a (maybe silly) question:

If the plan is to make a dish with both dried beans and chickpeas (both unsoaked), should one do them separately in the Instant Pot, or together?

According to x's (via @blue_dolphin) cooking times for Rancho Gordo beans in the Instant Pot,

Chickpeas (Garbanzo) need 32-35 minutes on high pressure

Cabellero need 10-12 if soaked, which for unsoaked I extrapolate to mean 20-22 minutes on high pressure.

 

So, do I do Chickpeas 10 minutes, quick release, add Cabellero and and do 20 more minutes (or maybe 18 to be safe)?

 

I'd be inclined to do them separately, to ensure that I don't overcook one while trying to get the other done. I haven't tried cooking a two-bean dish, though. I hope someone who has done so will answer.

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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1 hour ago, Smithy said:

I'd be inclined to do them separately, to ensure that I don't overcook one while trying to get the other done. I haven't tried cooking a two-bean dish, though. I hope someone who has done so will answer.

 

I agree on cooking them separately.  Personally, I'd soak both of these beans, cook them in separate pots in a low oven (after bringing them to a boil on the stovetop). Test and you can remove them as they are done. 

If you've been following along in the RG bean club Facebook page, you'll know that a lot of people have been reporting longer than expected cook times with the cabelleros.

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3 hours ago, TdeV said:

 

 

 

Please tell me why collards in an IP are special. And how do you cook them?

 

Kim and Shelby, you two are so alike--a joy to watch! And thanks so much for your endless supply of lovely photos. Sorry, rotuts, I couldn't edit you out of the quote.

That is so nice!  Kim is awesome and such a great cook, mom, wife and daughter and friend , so to be compared to her is the highest compliment!

 

Collards generally take hours and hours to cook until tender on the stove top.  Of course, it depends--if you pick young leaves that don't have the tough "stem" running down the middle, or you tear that part out, then it lessens the time.  The IP lessens that time a LOT.

 

If I feel like the collards are tough--meaning big older leaves--then I do  an hour and a half in the IP.   Not so tough, I do an hour.  Natural release on high.

 

I like to put a bit of oil in the IP and turn it on low saute.  Wait until that's hot and add some diced onion.  If using some diced bacon, throw that in after the onion cooks for a couple of minutes.  Then some diced garlic.  Saute for a minute or two.  Don't burn the garlic.  Turn off the IP and put in the collards while it's still hot and toss the leaves, onions and garlic and bacon around.  Add a cup or two of beef broth.  Some salt and pepper depending on how salty you like it.  High for the hour or hour and a half.  Natural release.

 

As an alternative to bacon, ham hock or ham bits are great.  Add them right before starting the IP for the cooking time with the collards.

 

edited to add---a bit of hot sauce like Louisiana Hot Sauce or Tobasco Sauce put in is good. Some people add a couple splashes of cider vinegar or red wine vinegar to the finished greens.


Edited by Shelby (log)
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Thanks for those instructions, @Shelby. I spotted some collard greens at a Walmart Superstore last week: 10 cents a bundle. I left them in the bin because they looked yellowish and tough - and at that price, how could they possibly be any good? OTOH at that price how could I possibly go wrong trying them? If I see them again, I'll get some to try using your method.

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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6 minutes ago, Smithy said:

Thanks for those instructions, @Shelby. I spotted some collard greens at a Walmart Superstore last week: 10 cents a bundle. I left them in the bin because they looked yellowish and tough - and at that price, how could they possibly be any good? OTOH at that price how could I possibly go wrong trying them? If I see them again, I'll get some to try using your method.

Yellowish is not good.  You were smart to stay away.  

 

In the stores around here they sell them on the off season pre-packaged like spinach or cole slaw mix.  Those are generally good.

 

I also want to add that even after an hour and half, I've had to restart and do another 30 mins with the really tough ones.  We like ours very soft.

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No Facebook @blue_dolphin. Thanks very much for letting me know about the extra time to cook the cabelleros.

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Advice please.

Below is a image of IP which cooked Rancho Gordo chickpeas for 10 minutes in the bean soaking water with veg (carrot, celery, onion cut in half) and nothing else. I forgot to add some olive oil. I followed Steve Sando's advice (posted here on eG) to add 1" liquid  (water) above soaked beans.

Can you tell me what the mungy substance is on the side of the IP?
Also the chickpeas are mush. Suggestions about what to do with them?

 

IMG_2152.thumb.JPG.9bb875afbc2a7f3777b7921bbc6dbe34.JPG


Edited by TdeV Clarity (log)

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On 1/21/2020 at 3:42 PM, TdeV said:

 

 

 

Please tell me why collards in an IP are special. And how do you cook them?

 

Kim and Shelby, you two are so alike--a joy to watch! And thanks so much for your endless supply of lovely photos. Sorry, rotuts, I couldn't edit you out of the quote.

I'm so sorry, @TdeV!  I saw you post this the other day and almost immediately fell ill.  I've been on the couch in a bit of a coma since then with a hell of a virus (not flu, thank goodness).  Managed to make it to a second dr. visit today where they discovered I also have an infection, so they added an antibiotic to my slew of meds.  Anyway, before I lapse into my evening coma I will link to my recipe for collards in the IP.  @Shelby gave you a great explanation and an answer to the WHY?  Here's the recipe.  Make sure to read my notes.  

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