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Okanagancook

Instant Pot. Multi-function cooker (Part 5)

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4 hours ago, JAZ said:

 

When I was testing recipes for my first pressure cooker book, which included versions for both electric and stove top models, I didn't find much difference in timing for the two versions. The electric models do take longer to reach pressure, but the difference in pressure levels rarely required a different cooking time once the pots reached pressure (and it was more often a shorter time for the electric than for the stove top). So, yes, using an electric pressure cooker increases total time, but for most dishes, it was only a matter of 5 to 10 minutes.

 

 

Depends on the pressure cookers compared.

The recommended operating p.s.i. of some stove-top PCs isn't close to 15 p.s.i.—the Kuhn Rikon Duromatic operates a ~11.6 p.s.i., same as the Instant Pot.

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37 minutes ago, DiggingDogFarm said:

COMMON REASONS FOR INSTANT POT BURN MESSAGE AND HOW TO AVOID IT

It's also mentioned in 'troubleshooting' on the Instant Pot website.

 

 

Thanks, I've seen that page, and also read all the troubleshooting items in the IP manuals and on the site. What I'm interested in is finding out more about the details of the circumstances from someone who's actually experienced this message. I'm going to talk to an IP tech person about the phenomenon, but thought if I could gather data from users who'd gotten the message, it would help in my conversation with the tech.

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@JAZ, I've never seen "burn" but I have had the overheat or "ovht" message pop up a number of times.  It's happened only when using the sauté function and I was either searing a piece of meat or browning a small amount of onions or veg.  

Every time it happened, it seamed reasonable to me that there might be a hot spot that could have triggered the warning.

Generally, I hit cancel, stir things around in an attempt to even out the heat in the pan and then restart.  I think there have been some occasions when I just stirred things around and the message went away without me pushing any buttons but I'm afraid I didn't keep any records.

I've never gotten that message when I had a full pot and I've never been unable to resume the sauté function in short order.

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17 hours ago, JAZ said:

Quick question for Instant Pot users (not other brands, in this case): have you ever gotten a "burn" message (I think in some models the message is "overheat")? If so, what were the circumstances, and were you able to fix it, or did you get the message multiple times? I'm consulting on a pressure cooker book, and the author seems to get this message often. Since I've never had that happen, I'm at a loss to try to figure out what she's doing that causes it. 

A friend was just describing to me how she had this happen every time she put a whole chicken directly on the floor of the pot. She's since started to put the bird on the trivet instead of directly on the floor, and hasn't seen the message since.

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Did some oxtails last night for noodle bowls.

 

Broth, oxtails--I hour, high pressure, natural release.  Still on the bone, but super tender.

 

IMG_4367.JPG.52a392d189b5031f6107ee80501a3f9d.JPG

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31 minutes ago, Shelby said:

Did some oxtails last night for noodle bowls.

 

Broth, oxtails--I hour, high pressure, natural release.  Still on the bone, but super tender.

 

IMG_4367.JPG.52a392d189b5031f6107ee80501a3f9d.JPG

*

Yum!

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03B97547-32DA-4672-833C-39C6FB59EA94.thumb.jpeg.d8632312a7ef4c19751dae1351e8671f.jpeg

 

 The best chicken soup I have made in quite some time. The stock was made in the IP using both cooked  and raw carcasses.  I stripped the cooked meat and stored it separately    I made the broth with just the carcasses and some water using the soup/broth setting.  I let that rest overnight in the refrigerator and this morning I skimmed off the fat. Prepped the  vegetables and gave them a brief sauté along with some pancetta and then returned everything to the IP and cooked on high-pressure for 4 minutes with natural release. At the end I adjusted the seasoning and added the reserved cooked chicken meat. Very satisfactory.

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Alert!  "White wine" update.  It's been over 2 weeks and it has a ways to go.  I plan to pick up some isinglass to help the process along.

20180409_112342.jpg

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21 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

Alert!  "White wine" update.  It's been over 2 weeks and it has a ways to go.  I plan to pick up some isinglass to help the process along.

20180409_112342.jpg

 

 

I love your teapot! Can't wait to see how this turns out :)

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Did a bag of Rancho Gordo chickpeas yesterday.  

 

Chickpeas, cover with about 3 inches of water, little garlic and a bay leaf.  35 mins.  High pressure.  Natural release.

 

Not too soft, not to hard.  Just right :) 

IMG_4386.JPG

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Thanks for that information, @Shelby. I need to start keeping a spreadsheet, or a log, of information like this for ready reference. In the past month I've done some smashing dinners in the IP - generally starting with beans - but unless I write it down somewhere I forget what I did and it joins the annals of the Irreproducible Results.

 

Here, as much for future reference as for general edification, is what I wrote to a friend about one IP enchilada casserole attempt:

Quote

I had a B-S chicken breast that had been partly cooked sous vide (1 hour at 149F). It was at the lightly-cooked stage. I pressure-cooked pinto beans in the IP; drained them and then added the chicken (cut into bite-sized chunks, minus the pieces I filched) along with some Hatch green chiles and their juices, some torn-up tortillas (whole wheat, because that's what I had) and some grated cheese.  Then I slapped the lid on, closed the vent, and pressure cooked for 11 minutes with a cool-down before natural release. (I had intended 10 minutes of cool-down, but it ended up being about 18.)

 
We were both delighted, although the casserole had a bit more free liquid than I'd intended due to my inclusion of all the juices from those frozen-then-thawed chiles. The chicken was a bit overcooked. I think that with this pressure-cooking treatment the chicken really didn't need to have been cooked ahead of time.

 

Incidentally, this was dinner for two - with leftovers - in the 3-quart mini. Next time I do it, I'll take a picture and post.

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20CAC916-F0FA-4ABD-AC10-9B2F6A9B4B60.thumb.jpeg.a35567f50a274461d5e1505dd436369b.jpeg

 

Dinner tonight. I really fancied some broccoli and I wanted to test out soft boiled eggs in the Instant Pot.  Since I live alone...  

 

These were fridge cold, large supermarket eggs. I cooked them in the mini using steam for three minutes with quick release. Then they went into ice water for just a few seconds so I could peel them. 

 

They are lovely eggs but a little too firm for my liking.  Tomorrow (should nature smile upon me during the ice storm) and I still have hydro, I will try them for two minutes. I know that the mini takes longer to reach pressure and that may be the issue here.

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DF4127B9-FC99-490F-AC31-F7F582E96CC0.thumb.jpeg.54beb36a4094047d835469bcacb1afc0.jpeg

 

 As above but two minute eggs. I will have to push it to the limit and try one minute eggs. 

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This is an old standby in the Instant pot perogies, garlic sausage, onions and cabbage. Saute the onions and sausage. Add 2 cups 1 inch chopped cabbage, 1/2 cup of water. Put your trivet on top after spraying with oil. Layer frozen perogies and butter them. They will stick but thats ok this is about diner style taste! Serve with sour cream.

30712043_10155380393717703_8762660902286655488_n.jpg

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On 4/15/2018 at 5:05 AM, Anna N said:

DF4127B9-FC99-490F-AC31-F7F582E96CC0.thumb.jpeg.54beb36a4094047d835469bcacb1afc0.jpeg

 

 As above but two minute eggs. I will have to push it to the limit and try one minute eggs. 

@Anna N Thank you, the two minute IP Mini egg is perfect for me. Fully set white, lovely cooked but liquid yolk. Mmmm...

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59 minutes ago, weedy said:

Low pressure?

Steam. 

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7 hours ago, weedy said:

I was HOPING for a winning homemade  pierogi recipe!

This is a friend's recipe that she wrote out for me.  Her perogies are really, really good.

 

"4            Cups  AP flour
      ½      Tsp   Salt
      1/3    Cup Vegetable oil
       1      Cup   Water
       2       Tbsps  Sour Cream
       2       Large Eggs
 
Blend the dry ingr. In a bowl.  Blend the wet ingr. in another bowl.  Add all tog., mix well and knead for 10 min.  You can add a little more flour if too sticky, but not too
much.  Dough should be soft.  Divide dough into 3 balls, and cover with plastic wrap
and let dough rest for ½ hour..  All this can be done in a mixer but I did it the old fashioned way.
When you roll out your dough, roll as thin as possible and if it springs back, let it relax
for a few secs, but cover with a tea towel.  When making the progies, place them on a cookie sheet and keep covered with a tea towel as you go along.  Cut the circles out
with a  2 ½ inch cookie cutter (not the bottom of a glass).  You can reroll scraps, but
only once.
 
Fillings can be a variety of ingredients. But our favourite is potatoes, sharp cheddar and onions.
You can also add bacon crumbles.  I didn’t add crumbles, but I sautéed the onions in
fresh bacon fat.
For the above amount of dough you need about 4 cups of Mashed potatoes, one large
Spanish onion or equivalent cooking onions, minced and as much cheddar as you like.
Just keep adding shredded cheddar til your mixture is orange.
Use russet potatoes and steam..  If you boil, they get too watery.  Mash, and add rest of
Ingr. While they are still hot, so that cheese melts.  I find it best to make the filling
before  the dough.  Roll rounded tbsps of filling in your oiled hands , place on cookie
sheets and refrigerate.  This lets the fillings set up so that they are easier to wrap in
the dough circles.   Don’t forget to salt and pepper filling, only after cheese it in, as it
is to easy to over salt before.
 
Periogies can be frozen before or after boiling but I like them boiled.   Boil in lots of
Lightly salted water with a tbsp. of oil.  Freeze on cookie sheets, then bag."
 

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@Okanagancook  Thanks for this.  I have copied it into my Evernote recipe file.  What I like to do with perogies after I boil them is fry them in some bacon fat.  Then, eat with fried onions and sour cream.   Yum.

 

Edited to add:  about how many does this make?


Edited by ElsieD (log)
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@ElsieDNot sure how many it makes but I would hazard a guess at about 25 to 30.  She made them for a dinner party and they were fabulous.  She only rolls the dough out once and does not re-roll the bits.  She said they are way better and the dough isn't very expensive to make.  Hope they work out.  You could always start with a half recipe of the dough.

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Instant Pot white beans with pesto, chicken with sumac and stir fried garlicky green beans. My white beans need to cook LONGER. That pesto in fantastic on them!

30738716_10155382249447703_523919085931593728_n.jpg

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Garlic in the iPot ?

 

I oc course like garlic.

 

its difficult to get consistent garlic in the supermarkets in my area " whole '

 

some has no flavor what so ever.

 

i use Tj's frozen garlic from Israel and the same brands frozen basil

 

im fine w both  flavor and potency is consistent .  and no garlic or basil goes bad.

 

however , Im not a big fan of roasted garlic.  the roosting caramelizes the garlic and give it a sweet taste

 

i have no idea at what temp the garlic begins this reaction.

 

had anyone used garlic  ( fresh or fresh frozen ) in an Rx for the iPot and found ' sweetness ? '

 

I make a turkey ragu  ( so9ing so now ) in the iPot but have not added garlic to the pot.

 

Ill add garlic when I what and reheat the ragu  and basil then

 

just before I add the FastaPasta.    the garlic cooks for a bit and does not have a raw taste.

 

 

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When one roasts garlic for caramelisation it’s usually up near 400 degrees. 

 

Otoh you no doubt sauté and simmer garlic in a pan at probably 200-250 don’t you? 

 

I doubt very much you’d find 250 degree instant pot garlic to be “sweetened”. 

 

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