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Your Daily Sweets: What Are You Making and Baking? (2017 – )

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On 6/26/2020 at 12:34 AM, jmacnaughtan said:

I still don't really "get" American scones though - what are they? Are they cakes? Muffins? Sweet, savoury or both?

 

I'll add my opinion to those who went before. I'd agree that American scones seem a bit like southern American biscuits, but firm and not especially moist. I loved scones when I traveled in England and Scotland. It's been a long time, but I remember them as having enough fat and flavor that they were tender - not as tender as a muffin, but more so than what we call a cookie. The scones I have bought here seem more like overgrown and dry cookies. Disappointing. I haven't tried making them, but if I do I'll look for a British recipe.

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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6 minutes ago, Smithy said:

 

I'll add my opinion to those who went before. I'd agree that American scones seem a bit like southern American biscuits, but firm and not especially moist. I loved scones when I traveled in England and Scotland. It's been a long time, but I remember them as having enough fat and flavor that they were tender - not as tender as a muffin, but more so than what we call a cookie. The scones I have bought here seem more like overgrown and dry cookies. Disappointing. I haven't tried making them, but if I do I'll look for a British recipe.

 

Try the CI blueberry recipe. It's different from a lot of scone recipes. It's got a little bit of a lamination technique.  And the liquid is a combo of sour cream and milk.

I've made cream scones, butter and cream, buttermilk. Tried a lot of different versions. My mother loves scones, and she said this one is her favorite. 

They are soft, and not dry at all. 

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I can't get enough rhubarb this time of year.  This is the pie crust and the rhubarb pie just out of the oven. Later this evening with vanilla ice cream.  I haven't had a slice of pie with ice cream in months.

IMG_1731.JPG

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1 hour ago, Smithy said:

 

I'll add my opinion to those who went before. I'd agree that American scones seem a bit like southern American biscuits, but firm and not especially moist. I loved scones when I traveled in England and Scotland. It's been a long time, but I remember them as having enough fat and flavor that they were tender - not as tender as a muffin, but more so than what we call a cookie. The scones I have bought here seem more like overgrown and dry cookies. Disappointing. I haven't tried making them, but if I do I'll look for a British recipe.

 

I have a scone recipe that purports to be from The Savoy.  I don't remember where I got it from but if you are interested I can PM it to you.  Just know that I haven't made it.

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I love scones.  I made some savoury ones the other day using old cheddar cheese and made another batch today.  Today's were supposed to be orange cranberry but dang it all I was out of cranberries so I used dried blueberries instead.  I came across a different way of adding butter and cream/milk/buttermilk to make scone batter.  Place the wet ingredient in the freezer and melt the butter in the microwave, just until melted.  Don't let it get too warm.  Get the rest of the stuff together.  Take your really cold wet ingredient and pour the butter into it, stirring it with a fork while you do so.  You will get tiny bits of butter evenly distributed through the wet ingredient.  Dump it into the dry mixture and stir until it comes together.  Works like a charm.

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I made blueberry scones and my first attempt at making croissants.....

it’s obvious I need more practice but, I was pleased with my first attempt....

 

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Posted (edited)

Thanks @Kim Shook and @RWood, that clears things up.

 

For what it's worth, I can't get clotted cream here, either. The closest is "crème double", which is thick, rich and tasty but not at all the same. Sigh.

 

Has anyone got a reliable base recipe for American scones? I'd like to try them again.

 

ETA: Just saw @Smithy's post. Thanks for the input!


Edited by jmacnaughtan (log)
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Island Banana Bread from Toni Tipton-Martin's Jubilee.  Lots of flavor from the cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, molasses and vanilla.

IMG_2689.thumb.jpeg.1f239e40956aeafb821eed67cab2bda0.jpeg

 I used walnuts instead of pecans,  Empress dates instead of Medjools and baked 3 mini loaves so I can stash 2 in the freezer.

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1 hour ago, gfron1 said:

I've been fixating on kustavilainen saaristolaisleipä lately, and once I got all the correct ingredients I can't bake or eat enough of this stuff!

FinnishBread.thumb.jpg.3e6390b1c869b68456b211725e6b9085.jpg

I had to look it up, too.  Gorgeous loaves and the descriptions I read sounded delicious.

 

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30 minutes ago, gfron1 said:

Also called archipelago bread I believe. 

Are you using a Finnish dark syrup, or molasses? Or something else? And malted rye?


Chris Hennes
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chennes@egullet.org

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On 6/28/2020 at 4:03 PM, David Ross said:

I can't get enough rhubarb this time of year.  This is the pie crust and the rhubarb pie just out of the oven. Later this evening with vanilla ice cream.  I haven't had a slice of pie with ice cream in months.

IMG_1731.JPG

My pie crust recipe I've been using for about 25 years now.  Call me old-fashioned, I use both butter and Crisco and cut the pastry by hand using a metal pastry cutter, but the recipe never fails.  

 

2 cups all-purpose flour

1/2 cup cake flour

2 tbsp. granulated sugar

1 tsp. salt

1/2 cup (stick) butter, chilled

1/2 cup Crisco shortening, chilled

1/2 cup ice water

1 egg beaten with 1 tsp. of water

1 tsp. granulated sugar

 

In a large bowl, combine the flour, cake flour, sugar, and salt. Using a pastry cutter, cut in the butter and Crisco. Cut the mixture until the pieces are the size of small peas.

 

Using a fork, pour in ice water a tablespoon at a time then toss with the fork to coat all the dry ingredients with water. Continue to add water and toss so that the dough begins to come together. Form the dough into a ball. It should be soft and come together but not be sticky.

 

Cover the ball of pie crust dough with plastic wrap and place in the refrigerator to chill for one hour. This lets the dough relax and firm up.

 

Remove the pie crust dough from the refrigerator and cut in half. Sprinkle the counter and the dough with flour, then roll into a circle about 1/8" thick. Place your pie dish on the dough and use a pizza cutter to cut the dough about 1" larger than the pie dish. Place the bottom crust in the pie dish. Spoon your filling in the pie dish. Roll out the top crust, then trim, and flute the edges. Cut a slit in the top of the pie crust to release steam during baking.

 

Beat the egg with a teaspoon of water, then brush the top of the pie with the egg wash. Sprinkle the top of the pie with demera sugar. Wrap the edges of the pie with foil or use a non-stick pie crust protector so it doesn't burn during baking.

Bake the pie according to your recipe.

 

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This is Bryan Ford's "Choco Pan de Coco" from his new cookbook, New World Sourdough -- I'm getting ready to make a video about this recipe, but figured I should do a test-run of the recipe first. Although it's a bit sweeter than traditional pan de coco, it's really not that sweet, especially considering the chocolate, which I find makes you expect a sweeter loaf. It's one of the few enriched sourdoughs I've made, and truth be told you'd be hard-pressed to recognize that it's naturally leavened. Not necessarily a negative, just interesting.

 

DSC_5623.jpg


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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