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Your Daily Sweets: What Are You Making and Baking? (2017 – )


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30 minutes ago, Jim D. said:

 

That one looks especially delicious. Are you willing to share the recipe for the topping, or at least the ingredients?

Interesting you say that, as I used more topping that I normally might - it made this crisp even better.

 

Of course...(if I can remember - I don't write anything down, which probably ought to change, as I'm not getting any younger).

 

Topping  

1/2 C   A/P
1/2 C   Pecans

3/4 C   Rolled Oats (I shy away from quick-cooking stuff)

1/2 C   Light brown sugar, packed

6     T   Butter

1/2 tsp    Salt 

All the above, pulse in the mini food processor, not too finely. 

 

I used more (by weight) rhubarb (1 lb.) as I did strawberries (1/2 lb.), and I used some (1/4 C) of the filling's total sugar (1/2 C) to macerate the rhubarb and pour off that exuded liquid, before mixing with the rest of the sugar, 1/2 tsp salt and 1 T of cornstarch. Into the 8" square buttered baking dish, baked at 375℉ for about 45 minutes. Did it in the CSO.

 

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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4 minutes ago, Rajala said:

I'm in some kind of tart mode. This is pistachio, apricot and caramel.

 

apricottart04.thumb.png.bfc7d967cc5c0bd0be2d7ae97ca8b3ad.png

 

Very pretty! I'm usually disappointed in apricots, but grilling them might improve the flavor. Forgive me if I've asked you this before, but are there apricots grown in your part of the world? I always think of them as needing a longer and hotter growing season.

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15 minutes ago, Smithy said:

 

Very pretty! I'm usually disappointed in apricots, but grilling them might improve the flavor. Forgive me if I've asked you this before, but are there apricots grown in your part of the world? I always think of them as needing a longer and hotter growing season.

 

I don't think you can get Swedish apricots. But these are from France, if I trust the guy I bought them from. Not sure I do - they're probably Turkish haha. But they do taste good. :)   

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6 minutes ago, shain said:

Vanilla ice cream, malt syrup, pretzels, peanuts.

 

 

I always enjoy the sweet/salty thing

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41 minutes ago, heidih said:

 

I always enjoy the sweet/salty thing

 

Me too, I find that a good dessert really needs some salt or acid.

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~ Shai N.

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First time making gâteau St. Honoré. Honey pastry cream and honey Chiboust, lemon Chantilly, fresh raspberries filled with raspberry jam, and candied lemon zest. Took me almost 6 hours just on the day of, not even counting prepping the puff pastry, craquelin, or pastry cream beforehand!

 

IMG_20200618_222648.jpg

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Happy 81st Birthday to my mom's cousin Peggy! We had a pizza party and cake. 

She loves white cake, so I made a scratch WASC and the 3 types of pizza. 

Sorta Margherita, one with a lot of stuff, and arugula and prosciutto. 

D21E8AC0-D68A-4270-8560-BEF3EEDEF3B2.jpeg

57423A96-909D-47DB-B66F-797A9E6F915E.jpeg

6983A799-E603-4A39-9439-5BF42F3ED259.jpeg

FA93E028-74AA-47FA-9F65-B8936C2FC3F7.jpeg

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2 hours ago, RWood said:

Happy 81st Birthday to my mom's cousin Peggy! We had a pizza party and cake. 

She loves white cake, so I made a scratch WASC and the 3 types of pizza. 

Sorta Margherita, one with a lot of stuff, and arugula and prosciutto. 

D21E8AC0-D68A-4270-8560-BEF3EEDEF3B2.jpeg

57423A96-909D-47DB-B66F-797A9E6F915E.jpeg

6983A799-E603-4A39-9439-5BF42F3ED259.jpeg

FA93E028-74AA-47FA-9F65-B8936C2FC3F7.jpeg

Wow.  81???  Happy Birthday, Peggy!  Lucky lady - that is one good looking cake!

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1 hour ago, Kim Shook said:

Wow.  81???  Happy Birthday, Peggy!  Lucky lady - that is one good looking cake!

Thanks! Yeah, she really doesn't look 81.

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Custard (same as a creme brulee, but with brown sugar). Topped with caramelized hazelnuts and cocoa nibs.

 

IMG_20200618_215656.thumb.jpg.3d152a887e36852f1f864c09c5ab6705.jpgIMG_20200618_220533_1.thumb.jpg.761aa488a949a2494b0a470f160a7e65.jpg

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~ Shai N.

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I tried a Food Network Geoffrey Zakarian strawberry pie recipe and it was a complete fail.  I have no idea if the problem was me or the recipe.  My mise:

IMG_2605.jpg.07dbd4153d3d80a900a8ba7e78d2e48e.jpg

 

The lovely finished pie:

IMG_2606.jpg.e81797212840ea25b144991fd85fb456.jpg

 

My problems started with serving – a “piece of pie”:

IMG_2608.thumb.jpg.510c16a8bce4d0631933ff585ece37ee.jpg

 

And this is the pie after the “slice” was removed and all the wet stuff rushed in to fill the void:

IMG_2609.jpg.f19409396677eb6c853fb5021b468d3c.jpg

It tasted very good, so I was very disappointed.  I really liked the little touch of St. Germaine.  But I basically ended up with 3 lb. of macerated strawberries.😟

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41 minutes ago, Kim Shook said:

I tried a Food Network Geoffrey Zakarian strawberry pie recipe and it was a complete fail.  I have no idea if the problem was me or the recipe.  My mise:

IMG_2605.jpg.07dbd4153d3d80a900a8ba7e78d2e48e.jpg

 

The lovely finished pie:

IMG_2606.jpg.e81797212840ea25b144991fd85fb456.jpg

 

My problems started with serving – a “piece of pie”:

IMG_2608.thumb.jpg.510c16a8bce4d0631933ff585ece37ee.jpg

 

And this is the pie after the “slice” was removed and all the wet stuff rushed in to fill the void:

IMG_2609.jpg.f19409396677eb6c853fb5021b468d3c.jpg

It tasted very good, so I was very disappointed.  I really liked the little touch of St. Germaine.  But I basically ended up with 3 lb. of macerated strawberries.😟

Everyone knows what's coming...I rush in and say, chunk it all up with the crust, mix it with whipped cream and you've got a lovely strawberry trifle.xD

It looks delicious, Kim.

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6 hours ago, Toliver said:

Everyone knows what's coming...I rush in and say, chunk it all up with the crust, mix it with whipped cream and you've got a lovely strawberry trifle.xD

It looks delicious, Kim.

 

I was thinking of how it would make for a great mix-in to frozen custard.

 

I'm sure it's tasty, which is, ultimately, the most important thing. But having looked up the recipe, I'd wager you could probably make it work next time by cooking the strawberry mix a little longer. Or honestly I'd even think about maybe adding a little pectin for assurance (but that's making it a different recipe, ofc).

 

Anyway I'd certainly eat it. I tend to call stuff like this, when I make it (and absolutely no insult intended), 'mess pie.'

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Back when my mother had to pick fresh cherries (20lbs), I decided to help use them up by making Cherry Almond Scones. I used the blueberry recipe from Cook's Illustrated. Added a little almond extract to the dough, then topped with sliced almonds before baking. Made a double batch that's stashed in the freezer. 

78DE6A48-69F6-403E-81A2-A4D7BAB5DD68.jpeg

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49 minutes ago, RWood said:

Back when my mother had to pick fresh cherries (20lbs), I decided to help use them up by making Cherry Almond Scones. I used the blueberry recipe from Cook's Illustrated. Added a little almond extract to the dough, then topped with sliced almonds before baking. Made a double batch that's stashed in the freezer. 

78DE6A48-69F6-403E-81A2-A4D7BAB5DD68.jpeg

One look and my mouth actually began watering....

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On 6/24/2020 at 6:31 PM, RWood said:

Back when my mother had to pick fresh cherries (20lbs), I decided to help use them up by making Cherry Almond Scones. I used the blueberry recipe from Cook's Illustrated. Added a little almond extract to the dough, then topped with sliced almonds before baking. Made a double batch that's stashed in the freezer. 

78DE6A48-69F6-403E-81A2-A4D7BAB5DD68.jpeg

 

Those do look very appetising - I'm a big fan of cherries used well :)

 

I still don't really "get" American scones though - what are they? Are they cakes? Muffins? Sweet, savoury or both?

 

Growing up in the UK, I learned early on that scones are first and foremost a vehicle for butter/clotted cream and jam. Is it the same for these?

 

I remember following a Francisco Migoya recipe for "scones", and being a bit uneasy about what came out of the oven (but I have other issues with him too)...

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9 hours ago, jmacnaughtan said:

 

Those do look very appetising - I'm a big fan of cherries used well :)

 

I still don't really "get" American scones though - what are they? Are they cakes? Muffins? Sweet, savoury or both?

 

Growing up in the UK, I learned early on that scones are first and foremost a vehicle for butter/clotted cream and jam. Is it the same for these?

 

I remember following a Francisco Migoya recipe for "scones", and being a bit uneasy about what came out of the oven (but I have other issues with him too)...

I am going on the ONE time I had scones in England and also what my English dad, @Ted Fairhead said about American scones.  The American ones are more cakey than British ones.  And, because we tend to put the goodies IN them, we don't tend to put stuff ON them after they bake.  Plus, sadly, we generally can't get good clotted cream 😞.  I love them - even the store bought ones, but if I managed somehow to get some clotted cream and Tiptree Little Scarlet strawberry preserves, I wouldn't make them, I'd make British scones.  Hope that helps.  

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On 6/24/2020 at 11:31 AM, RWood said:

Back when my mother had to pick fresh cherries (20lbs), I decided to help use them up by making Cherry Almond Scones. I used the blueberry recipe from Cook's Illustrated. Added a little almond extract to the dough, then topped with sliced almonds before baking. Made a double batch that's stashed in the freezer. 

78DE6A48-69F6-403E-81A2-A4D7BAB5DD68.jpeg

 

Shall I just go ahead and send you my address? I believe I could eat a dozen of these, gluten be damned.

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

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1 hour ago, Kim Shook said:

Plus, sadly, we generally can't get good clotted cream 😞.

 

@Kim Shook. How about mascarpone cheese? I used to work at a US hotel that served afternoon tea with "Devonshire" cream. Hotel claimed it was authentic & imported, blah blah blah, and I ate a lot of that cream when working at the hotel. Anyway, I know it's not the same, but mascarpone might be an OK substitute for scones. I haven't had it for a long time, but I liked Crave Brothers mascarpone, made in Wisconsin, US.

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10 hours ago, jmacnaughtan said:

 

Those do look very appetising - I'm a big fan of cherries used well :)

 

I still don't really "get" American scones though - what are they? Are they cakes? Muffins? Sweet, savoury or both?

 

Growing up in the UK, I learned early on that scones are first and foremost a vehicle for butter/clotted cream and jam. Is it the same for these?

 

I remember following a Francisco Migoya recipe for "scones", and being a bit uneasy about what came out of the oven (but I have other issues with him too)...

 

American Scones to me seem similar to a southern biscuit, just with added stuff. So, no need for the jam, etc. 

They can be either sweet or savory, I make one with gruyere, dill and scallions that is very popular, and I'll make bacon, cheddar and chives. Anything really.

I remember my grandmother asking me for "one of those sweet biscuits." So, that's why I think more biscuit (not an English biscuit 😊) than anything else. 

And I agree with you about Migoya 😑😊

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39 minutes ago, weinoo said:

Rhubarb, strawberries, a lonely peach found its way into yesterday's crisp. Served our portions with a dollop of crème frâiche.

 

Looks good. So how are leftovrs dealt with for best result? Ideally I'd serve it to guests and it would be gone but sometimes it is just one or two of us. 

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