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Your Daily Sweets: What Are You Making and Baking? (2017 – )

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On 9/22/2019 at 7:05 PM, eugenep said:

Napoleon. Turned puff pastry dough 6 times and rested overnight. Mousseline filling. 

43E86ABF-6B59-49D3-9042-1DB59F6CA494.jpeg

 

I love them but am never sure hiw to approach from an eater perspective. Tips?

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59 minutes ago, heidih said:

I love them but am never sure hiw to approach from an eater perspective. Tips?

lol 

 

to tell you the truth I just made that one napolean and gave it to my GF who made a mess of it and it collapsed in this messy puddle 

 

I just cut it into cracker size and keep the mousseline in the fridge and spread it like jam whenever I eat it 

 

it's super good. I think the pic can't describe the taste 

 

I froze half the puff pastry for next time which I tried to make again last weekend 

 

It was too close to the broiler (the last step of caramelizing the top) and it caught on fire 

 

all that butter melted off the layers of black smokey dough and became a pool of oil -fuel for the fire 

 

I panicked - it was like a raging fire in my oven 

 

I googled what to do and it said to let it burn out on its own since oven is safest place for a fire 

 

I just let it burn but decided to tell my GF (since there is a fire and her life is at risk too) 

 

She decided to be more proactive and took it out of the oven and the oxygen gave the fire even more fuel and the fire became bigger 

 

I told her to put it back in pronto 

 

and then i googled some more and it said to throw baking soda on it which I did 

 

but the second attempt at napolean was a failure 

 

that was sccccarrry 

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6 hours ago, heidih said:

I love them but am never sure hiw to approach from an eater perspective. Tips?

You are supposed to turn it on it's side and eat it with a knife and fork.

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8 hours ago, eugenep said:

lol 

 

to tell you the truth I just made that one napolean and gave it to my GF who made a mess of it and it collapsed in this messy puddle 

 

I just cut it into cracker size and keep the mousseline in the fridge and spread it like jam whenever I eat it 

 

it's super good. I think the pic can't describe the taste 

 

I froze half the puff pastry for next time which I tried to make again last weekend 

 

It was too close to the broiler (the last step of caramelizing the top) and it caught on fire 

 

all that butter melted off the layers of black smokey dough and became a pool of oil -fuel for the fire 

 

I panicked - it was like a raging fire in my oven 

 

I googled what to do and it said to let it burn out on its own since oven is safest place for a fire 

 

I just let it burn but decided to tell my GF (since there is a fire and her life is at risk too) 

 

She decided to be more proactive and took it out of the oven and the oxygen gave the fire even more fuel and the fire became bigger 

 

I told her to put it back in pronto 

 

and then i googled some more and it said to throw baking soda on it which I did 

 

but the second attempt at napolean was a failure 

 

that was sccccarrry 

 

Thank you - made my eve on a sucky day. No stranger to burn incidents...  I have scars!

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Not attractive but flavor sounds great. I'm in - though strong coffee required alongside

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I need a little guidance, please.  Mr. Kim asked me some time ago to make the Jacques Torres Chocolate Chip Cookies.  I finally put the dough together day before yesterday and baked them yesterday.  They are enormous cookies (3.5 oz. each):

DSCN0169.JPG.acf095094156cfb6a108fef125070a39.JPG

 

They should really be called chocolate CHUNK because he specifically dissuades you from using chips.  They are really gorgeous – top:

DSCN0170.JPG.010ae2f03452e660903751522fa4ec79.JPG

 

And bottom:

DSCN0171.thumb.JPG.e6337ace8a45c7d518bacc4a9133ff82.JPG

 

Inside, too:

DSCN0172.JPG.e4b12857dab4aa4231e938da93667ccf.JPG

 

Crisp on the outside and chewy in the middle.  The perfect cooky.  Mr. Kim and Jessica were having serious moments with these cookies.  You know, I’m not sure if I really like chocolate chip cookies, even orgasmic ones.  Because I’ve never had one that I went crazy over.  And these were good.  But I’m not tempted to go downstairs to get another one.  But here’s the thing – I’m not sure that I used REALLY excellent chocolate for these.  I just decided on the spur of the moment while I was at Aldi to make them.  I had everything but the chocolate, so I bought 2 bars of Moser Roth 70% dark and 3 bars of Choceur 49%.  What I’m wondering is if I went ahead and bought the Jacques Torres or the Valrhona chocolate, are they SO much better that I might love these cookies?  I am just so ignorant about dark chocolate.  I spent just under $10 for 1 1/2 lb. of chocolate.  The Jacques Torres would be about $15 for the same amount – half again as much, which isn’t bad, but I’m sure I’d have to pay postage.  The Valrhona is more than twice that, so that’s out.  I’d really like to be able to go to a local store and buy what I can feel confident is really GOOD dark chocolate to try next time I make these.  Your opinions would be wonderful!  

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@Kim Shook  I thought I was the only one who doesn't go weak at the knees over chocolate chip cookies.  Just thought you might like to know that there is one other person in the world who feels about CCC the way you do.  

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I love CCC's , and even better :  CCC w toasted pecans.

 

im wondering if  CCC's that have more chocolate in them , chunks that melt , need

 

creamer chocolate that old fashioned nestle or TJ's semi-sweet chocolate 

 

I wouldn't mind a few of these BTW

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40 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

@Kim Shook  I thought I was the only one who doesn't go weak at the knees over chocolate chip cookies.  Just thought you might like to know that there is one other person in the world who feels about CCC the way you do.  

Add me to that list.  Shortbread cookies...now that's my weakness.

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Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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So, here's an odd thing.  I just took a bite of one of the cookies and it tastes much better to me than it did warm last night.  I think I will probably finish the entire cooky (and call it lunch - they are SO huge).  The chocolate taste is more pronounced.  Odd, huh?  Still hoping someone will chime in with some judgement about my choice of chocolate and whether it would be worth it to get something of a higher quality.  

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I am not either a crazypants for CCC but I do not know that chocolate quality is essential. Heck  am using Kroger semi-sweet! Butter, salt, and a hint of spice and CRISP will kinda do it for me. On deck next week to freeze for holiday gifting. Will report back. And also not a fan of the warm as they need to crisp up for me...to each their own ;)

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There's not much sense in using top quality dark chocolate for baked cookies. During baking the chocolate reaches relatively high temperatures, so most of the secondary and tertiary flavours (the ones that make the difference between good chocolate and great chocolate) go lost. It's better to avoid high percentage chocolates too, they risk to "burn". Usually pastry chefs choose good dark chocolate around 55%, keeping far from top quality 70%+.

 

 

 

Teo

 

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Teo

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5 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

The Pound Plus bars from TJ's used to be one of my go to chocolates for things such as these. Don't think you need to spend a fortune. 

That is exactly what I use for my Christmas candymaking and baking.  I thought I was cheaping out!  Thanks, @Kerry Beal

 

4 hours ago, teonzo said:

There's not much sense in using top quality dark chocolate for baked cookies. During baking the chocolate reaches relatively high temperatures, so most of the secondary and tertiary flavours (the ones that make the difference between good chocolate and great chocolate) go lost. It's better to avoid high percentage chocolates too, they risk to "burn". Usually pastry chefs choose good dark chocolate around 55%, keeping far from top quality 70%+.

 

 

 

Teo

 

That is good to know.  I'll put that in the recipe when I enter it into my webpage.  Thank you.

 

 

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Inspired by Neapolitan sweets.

Sfogliatelle style buttery filo cups, filled with ricotta, candied orange, cinnamon; and baked.

Cassata filo cups, filled with unbaked ricotta, marzipan, candied orange, Amarena cherries and dark chocolate.

 

IMG_20190928_215757.thumb.jpg.f1b37ce13680fd30338a8f7224af366d.jpg

 

IMG_20190928_215625_1.jpg

 

IMG_20190928_215725.jpg


Edited by shain (log)
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~ Shai N.

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4 hours ago, shain said:

Inspired by Neapolitan sweets.

Sfogliatelle style buttery filo cups, filled with ricotta, candied orange, cinnamon; and baked.

Cassata filo cups, filled with unbaked ricotta, marzipan, candied orange, Amarena cherries and dark chocolate.

 

IMG_20190928_215757.thumb.jpg.f1b37ce13680fd30338a8f7224af366d.jpg

 

IMG_20190928_215625_1.jpg

 

IMG_20190928_215725.jpg

 

Gorgeous!  I would love to taste one of each!  Those cherries are so lustrous and dark that for a second I thought I was looking at black olives!

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23 hours ago, heidih said:

I am not either a crazypants for CCC but I do not know that chocolate quality is essential. Heck  am using Kroger semi-sweet! Butter, salt, and a hint of spice and CRISP will kinda do it for me. On deck next week to freeze for holiday gifting. Will report back. And also not a fan of the warm as they need to crisp up for me...to each their own ;)

 

And the local fire station was quite happy a bit ago  They can not go home today at all....  

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Every year at this time I post about the Apple Tarte Tatin and for years I've been posting my efforts here at eGullet.  Living in Washington we are fortunate to be not only the top producer of apples, but we have dozens and dozens of different varieties available to us throughout the season.  This year I bought a new camera specifically for taking food photos, which also enhances the look of the Tarte Tatin this year.  When I tell people the variety of apple I use they are surprised-the Golden Delicious.  My original recipe is adapted from Saveur Cooks Authentic French cookbook which calls for the Golden Delicious.  I've tried the Granny Smith, Fuji, Gala and many others and none seem to get the right balance of sweet and slightly tart, and soak up the buttery caramel.  And after the long baking time the Golden Delicious still holds its shape.  Here is the recipe, along with some new photos for this year. This recipe suits a 10" cast-iron skillet but the photos were taken using a 6" cast iron skillet.

Apple Tarte Tatin 2.JPG

 

Golden Delicious Apples.JPG

 

Peeling the Apples.JPG

For the apples and caramel-

10-12 Golden Delicious apples, peeled, cored and cut in quarters

2 sticks butter

1 1/2 cups granulated sugar

1 tbsp. light corn syrup (optional, I add it because it makes the caramel more sticky)

 

For the pastry-

2 1/3 cups all-purpost flour

1/3 cup cake flour

1 tbsp. granulated sugar

1/2 tsp salt

1 stick cold butter, cut into cubes

1/2 cup Crisco

2/3 cup ice water

 

Make the apples and caramel-

-Heat the oven to 400. Heat a 10" cast-iron skillet over medium heat. Add the butter to the skillet and melt. Once the butter is melted, Add the sugar and stir it into the melted butter. Stir in the corn syrup.

-Once the sugar and butter bubbles, arrange the apples in the skillet. The photo shows a small 6" skillet with apples halves. For this recipe, we use a 10" skillet and overlap the apple quarters next to each other to fill the skillet.

-Place the skillet in the oven and cook the apples in the caramel for 1 1/2 hours. Check on the apples every 20 minutes and press down using a spatula. The apples are done when the caramel is a deep golden color.

-Once the sugar and butter bubbles, arrange the apples in the skillet. The photo shows a small 6" skillet with apples halves. For this recipe, we use a 10" skillet and overlap the apple quarters next to each other to fill the skillet.

-Place the skillet in the oven and cook the apples in the caramel for 1 1/2 hours. Check on the apples every 20 minutes and press down using a spatula. The apples are done when the caramel is a deep golden color.

-Remove the skillet from the oven and let cool to room temperature. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight.

Caramelized Apples.JPG

 

Make the pastry and bake the Tarte Tatin-

-The next day make the pastry. In a large bowl combine the flour, cake flour, sugar and salt and mix together. Add the butter and Crisco and cut into the flour using a hand-held pastry cutter. The pastry should be the size of large peas.

Add the ice water a little at a time and use a fork to blend it into the flour mixture. Continue to add enough ice water for the pastry to form soft ball. Cover the pastry and chill in the fridge one hour.

-Heat the oven to 400. Let the pastry dough come to room temperature until soft so it's easy to roll out. Flour the counter and roll our the pastry to about 1/8" thickness. Gently place the pastry over the top of the apples in the skillet, then trim the edges. Fold in any extra pastry to fit within the skillet.

Pastry on top of the apples.JPG

 

-Heat the oven to 400. Let the pastry dough come to room temperature until soft so it's easy to roll out. Flour the counter and roll our the pastry to about 1/8" thickness. Gently place the pastry over the top of the apples in the skillet, then trim the edges. Fold in any extra pastry to fit within the skillet.

-Bake the Tarte Tatin in the oven until the pastry is golden and the caramel is bubbling around the sides, about 30 minutes. Remove the skillet from the oven and let it cool 2 minutes.

Tarte Tatin out of the oven.JPG

 

-Run a paring knife around the edge of the pastry. Place a cookie rack on a baking sheet then place it, rack facing down on top of the apples in the skillet. Hold the skillet with one hand and the baking sheet in another and gently turn over the skillet to unmold the Tarte Tatin onto the cookie rack. Let the Tarte Tatin cool from 10-12 minutes for the caramel start to set before serving.
Apple Tarte Tatin 2.JPG
 
-Slice and serve warm with vanilla ice cream.
Apple Tarte Tatin.JPG
 
 

 

 
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@David Ross

 

Apple Tarte Tatin is one of my favorite deserts.  yours looks perfect

 

and has the mandatory vanilla ice cream.

 

congratulations . Im sure your work was well worth it .

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3 hours ago, rotuts said:

@David Ross

 

Apple Tarte Tatin is one of my favorite deserts.  yours looks perfect

 

and has the mandatory vanilla ice cream.

 

congratulations . Im sure your work was well worth it .

You know up until about 15 years ago I never had heard of the Apple Tarte Tatin.  Every year I make it the flavor is always the same.   You just sort of melt and say "aah," my friend is back.

 

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Another one of my Fall favorites is the Pear Brown Betty.  I think most people think of Apple Brown Betty, which is delicious, but the pears add a different flavor and a nice change from apples.  I've researched the Brown Betty and it appears that it found its way to restaurant menus as early as the 1860's, but it might have an earlier legacy.  It's so simple that you wonder how something with four ingredients, pears, butter, breadcrumbs and spice can be so delicious.  In this recipe I used Bartlett pears, but it's just as good with Bosc, Red Bosc, D'Anjou and even Asian pears. This year instead of cinnamon and nutmeg I used Chinese Five-Spice.  Full disclosure, the cinnamon and nutmeg were far beyond their "best" date so in the bin it went and out came the Five-Spice.

 

Pear Brown Betty Baked.jpg

 

Ingredients-

  • 2 cups fresh bread crumbs
  • 1 cup dark brown sugar
  • 1/2 tsp. Chinese five-spice powder substitute cinnamon and nutmeg
  • 6 large Bartlett pears
  • 10 tbsp. butter, cut into small cubes

Instructions-

  1. Heat the oven to 375. Spray a baking dish with cooking spray.

  2. To make the fresh breadcrumbs, cut the crusts off 8-10 slices of white bread. Break the bread into pieces and place in a food processor. Pulse the bread until it's broken into crumbs. Keep the breadcrumbs covered in the fridge for up to one week.

  3. Peel the pears and cut in half. Scoop out the core and cut the stem out that runs down the middle of the pear. Cut the pears into small chunks.

  4. In a large bowl combine the brown sugar, five-spice powder, and pears. Toss the pears to coat in the sugar and spices.

  5. Layer half the pear mixture in the bottom of the baking dish then add a layer of 1 cup of the breadcrumbs. Put half the cubes of butter on top of the breadcrumbs. Add another layer of pears, breadcrumbs and the rest of the cubes of butter.

  6. Cover the baking dish and bake for one hour until the crust is golden and bubbling. Serve the Pear Brown Betty warm with vanilla ice cream or whipped cream.

https://todayshomekitchen.com/pear-brown-betty/

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@David Ross

 

again . a few Kudos Your Way

 

the various Beties , Frumps , Crisps and Crumbles

 

all have  fresh fruit in them.  I love them all

 

Pears are interesting , as they are the only ' stone ' fruit that

 

ripens off the tree .  i.e. they have seeds.

 

pleased you are on top of things.

 

 

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