Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

pjm333

Your Daily Sweets: What Are You Making and Baking? (2017 – )

Recommended Posts

My first "upload",hello everyone...!!!

Just came out. Red wine cake....  :)

 

 

IMG_20190113_133102.jpg

  • Like 13
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, leonidas said:

My first "upload",hello everyone...!!!

Just came out. Red wine cake....  :)

 

 

IMG_20190113_133102.jpg

Tell me more. Red wine takes the place of other liquids in the cake? Looks moist - how does it taste?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Kerry Beal

 

1st step :

220 g butter at room temperature

450 g Brown sugar
130 g crystal Sugar

 

2nd step :   
4 large eggs at room temperature


3rd step :   
500 g Dry red wine

 

4rd step :   

400 g flour for all uses
130 g cocoa
vanilla scent
1 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. of cooking soda

 

Beat the butter with the sugars very well.

Add the eggs one by one and then the wine.

At the end all the rest of the ingredients and the final mix.

 

I bake the mix in a round shape 24cm. diameter and 7cm. height in 160ο C for an hour.  

 

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@leonidas this looks like a very tasty cake :)

In BraveTart, Stella Park has a recipe for red velvet cake that uses red wine.

 

But I'm now intrigued about a cake with wine as a main flavor (sans cocoa). Anyone familiar with one? Perhaps a variation over rum baba.


~ Shai N.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, shain said:

@leonidas this looks like a very tasty cake :)

In BraveTart, Stella Park has a recipe for red velvet cake that uses red wine.

 

But I'm now intrigued about a cake with wine as a main flavor (sans cocoa). Anyone familiar with one? Perhaps a variation over rum baba.

I have a vague memory of a sherry or madeira cake.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

I have a vague memory of a sherry or madeira cake.

The closest we ever came was a rum cake, based on a box of yellow cake mix and a box of pudding, baked in a bundt pan and glazed with a boozy glaze after. My mom came up with a sherry variation.


MelissaH

Oswego, NY

Chemist, writer, hired gun

Say this five times fast: "A big blue bucket of blue blueberries."

foodblog1 | kitchen reno | foodblog2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
59 minutes ago, MelissaH said:

The closest we ever came was a rum cake, based on a box of yellow cake mix and a box of pudding, baked in a bundt pan and glazed with a boozy glaze after. My mom came up with a sherry variation.

I yes - I love that rum cake with the rum glaze. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A little reading has brought me to the realization that madeira cake is served with it - not made with it. Unlike sherry cake which is made with cream sherry.


Edited by Kerry Beal (log)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, shain said:

But I'm now intrigued about a cake with wine as a main flavor (sans cocoa). Anyone familiar with one?

 

In Sweet, Ottolenghi has Vineyard Cake. It uses a bottle of Muscat (de Beaumes de Venise in this instance) and is based on a recipe from Gourmet magazine. If you search, you'll find several bloggers who've made it. Epicurious has a Beaumes-de-Venise Cake which seems to be the aforementioned original. Do have a look at the comments where it receives a largely positive response. I haven't made it myself so can't add anything beyond that.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’m thinking.....red wine cake?  Life just got so much better.....

  • Like 3
  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

H'mmm. My to-bake-this-week list may have grown....


Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cannelé. Batter made with egg yolks, moulds coated with beeswax.

 

1407051568_CanneleStack.thumb.jpg.756e8b1325438e07fffddb9accef4a72.jpg

 

The difference between the dark and light ones is just oven position.

 

234520821_CanneleDark.thumb.jpg.24e21861f768cb799f36a315a0d8557b.jpg

 

904723068_CanneleLight.thumb.jpg.b961ef6805dbebff216a06e40d768e36.jpg

 

Vive la France!

  • Like 16
  • Thanks 1
  • Delicious 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Pete Fred said:

Cannelé. Batter made with egg yolks, moulds coated with beeswax.

 

The difference between the dark and light ones is just oven position.

 

Vive la France!

Did you happen to catch the article on cannelé in the most recent Toothache magazine? Kriss Harvey compared 3 techniques, different ingredients and showed all the variations. Interesting article. Yours look perfect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, gfron1 said:

Did you happen to catch the article on cannelé...

 

I did not. I'll keep my ear to the ground for the digital edition. Thanks. 👍

 

I do like Mr Harvey; his focus and attention to detail are right up my street. He talked abour cannelés on npr a few years ago, if anyone's interested.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I made a tart with whipped vanilla ganache, some marzipan and financier dough. It's my interpretation of the "semla".

 

 semla2019-01.thumb.PNG.5846fb0f5b43c8c122c6149359ec1ef9.PNG

  • Like 15

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Red Velvet cake for the birthday of one of Mr. Kim's co-workers:

DSCN9052.JPG.dce8f38e4bb16bca6a02bed3d61059ac.JPG

Topped with cinnamon pecans.

 

20190110_143954.jpg.62eb1d85460938f5181ed20d278401a5.jpg

We are not fans of red velvet, but it is her favorite.  Mr. Kim said it had a great texture and everyone loved it.  He didn't even get to bring me a smidge to test!

  • Like 9
  • Delicious 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/13/2019 at 8:02 AM, Kerry Beal said:

I have a vague memory of a sherry or madeira cake.

I have a recipe for a Madeira cake, translated (loosely) from the original Spanish, brought to me in the 1970s 

by the daughter of friends who had spent two years at the University in Madrid.

I know it's not in my computer so I will have to hunt for it.

It uses oil and a lot of Madeira, infused with orange zest plus additional "raw" orange zest and candied orange peel bits in the glaze.  The bakers in Madrid made it in long loaves and poured on the glaze while the cakes were still warm from the oven. 

Very, very sweet.  Lynn said that she loved the taste but could only eat a small amount.

She said her Spanish friends all had a major sweet tooth.  There were also pastries filled with boozy pastry cream or the Spanish equivalent.  She also brought me a recipe for a liquor-laced cheesecake but I don't recall ever preparing that.

I did make Torrijos (?Sp.)  That she said were served at Tapas bars for a sweet after the savories.

 

  • Like 4

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know why this slipped my mind earlier.  Martha Stewart made a Portugal Port wine Pound Cake on one of her shows and a few years later, Emeril Lagasse made a video of it.  Now there are several Port Wine Chocolate cake recipes on line.

 

I made one of these cakes years ago because I had a couple of bottle of Port that were gifts from people who had forgotten that I was allergic to alcohol. They had been sitting in my pantry for years and no one I knew particularly like port.  

I made a reduction and I think I posted about it here.  I poured the entire bottle into a slow cooker and left it alone overnight, uncovered and ended up with less than a pint of syrupy, strongly flavored liquid with low alcohol content and used that to make the cake with cocoa.

I'm still looking for the recipe I used, among the thousands on my old backup hard drive.

  • Like 4

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Halva babka, based on the one at Breads Bakery in New York. Their filling, but I swapped in a brioche feuilletée for the bread. Not much of a looker at first glance (that's a tahini glaze on top)...

 

303200396_HalvaBabka.thumb.jpg.59bc5f46bf1b552856bd66b00a3f4d69.jpg

 

...but more appealing once opened up...

 

1749413670_HalvaBabkaSliced.thumb.jpg.16961112a6939542b97dee40ec3b5a49.jpg

 

A bit disappointing, sadly. The flavour was quite muted. I much prefer their chocolate babka.

 

  • Like 9
  • Delicious 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/19/2019 at 12:09 AM, Pete Fred said:

Halva babka, based on the one at Breads Bakery in New York. Their filling, but I swapped in a brioche feuilletée for the bread. Not much of a looker at first glance (that's a tahini glaze on top)...

[pics removed]

A bit disappointing, sadly. The flavour was quite muted. I much prefer their chocolate babka.

 

 

A laminated babka is a beautiful thing, so I'm sure that it would have been delicious even sans filling.

I've eaten and made my fair share of tahini filled babkas, which are quite popular in Israel. I'll share my 2 cents.

First, obviously, is to use a good tahini, one with a strong nutty well-toasted flavor, naturally sweet and gently bitter. You should also make sure to use plenty of it.

The second tip is that tahini flavor is mostly "bass notes", and has no acidity. You need to complement it in order for it to come through (especially in bread).In savory applications, tahini is always paired with acid, like lemon. In pastry, I like to pair it with silan (date molasses) which adds this acidity. It also boosts the caramelized notes of the tahini. The second thing that you want is some high notes - a good vanilla will do, but I much prefer a sprinkle of rose water (or orange blossom), cardamom also does wonders.

 

Here's my filling recipe (for a cake made from 250g of flour):

85g tahini

80g silan (one with no sugar added), you can sub with blended dates and a sprinkle of lemon juice.

a big pinch of salt

Rose or orange blossom water (strength varies greatly, so go with your taste, I use ~1/2 tsp)

1/4 tsp cardamom

optional: 1/4 tsp cinnamon

 

Sometimes I replace part of the tahini with coconut cream.

For the looks, try a cover of ground pistachios.


Edited by shain (log)
  • Like 4

~ Shai N.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, shain said:

 

I'll share my 2 cents.

 

Thanks. Worth a lot more than two cents. I'll file these tips in my culinary mind palace. ☺️

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@shain, do you mind telling the brand of tahini you use?  (I realize you may use something not available in the U.S.)  I was using one that I liked in a filling for chocolates (the sesame had been roasted, unlike many others), but the company had a recent recall for contamination, so I am reticent about using that one again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Jim D. My favorite is "Har Bracha", it is great for sweets and raw applications, it is strong and toasty, sweet and bitter. The one I use more often is "Al Karawan" which is my favorite for savory applications such as hummus and tahini sauce. Another good one is "Al Arz". "Al Jamal" is also very good, but only for sweets (it's too dark and sweet for savory applications). 

 

  • Like 1

~ Shai N.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...