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Your Daily Sweets: What Are You Making and Baking? (2017 – )


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8 minutes ago, oli said:

Where is the USA do we find 'blancmange' or what is a substitute?

 

Dear @oli blancmange in British English means pudding in American English, so I think in States you have to look for powdered vanilla pudding. I hope it is possible to buy it in the USA

Kasia Warsaw/Poland

www.home-madepatchwork.com

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23 minutes ago, oli said:

Where is the USA do we find 'blancmange' or what is a substitute?

It's just a pudding thickened with cornstarch, basically. 

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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26 minutes ago, chromedome said:

It's just a pudding thickened with cornstarch, basically. 

Well, I was always taught that it was a sweet almond gelatinised dessert, made with ground almonds/almond milk and gelatine! I will have to go through my old books and study notes to see if my memory is buggered or still reasonably okay! But then, the modern instant pudding manufactures will surely have come up with a modern version made without gelatine and using cornstarch or some other powder to thicken a mixture.

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From The Food Lover's Companion:

 

"A simple cooked pudding made of milk, cornstarch, sugar and vanilla. Gelatin may be substituted for the cornstarch. The hot mixture is poured into a mold, chilled, unmolded and served with a sweet sauce or fresh fruit. The original blancmange used pulverized almonds in lieu of cornstarch." 

 

IIRC the ancestral almond-based version was often savory, but that goes back centuries. 

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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Neither science nor citation here but I ate a lot of blancmange in my time and it surely was not the same as vanilla pudding. Carry on. :D

 

Edited to add a citation :D:D

 

See. Mrs. Beeton knew.   And you thought I was just a young pup. 

Edited by Anna N (log)
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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

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44 minutes ago, Anna N said:

Neither science nor citation here but I ate a lot of blancmange in my time and it surely was not the same as vanilla pudding. Carry on. :D

 

Edited to add a citation :D:D

 

See. Mrs. Beeton knew.   And you thought I was just a young pup. 

Interesting, my mom never bought blancmange as far as I know when we lived in BC.  I would like to know of a name of a product that I can substitute, if it is not the same as vanilla pudding.

Edited by oli (log)
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15 minutes ago, oli said:

Interesting, my mom never bought blancmange as far as I know when we lived in BC.  I would like to know of a name of a product that I can substitute, if it is not the same as vanilla pudding.

 

Based on what @Kasia, who posted the recipe, said, this looks look like it would do the trick:  https://www.amazon.ca/Pearce-Duffs-Assorted-Blancmange-146g/dp/B0051C0Q92

 

 

 

Edited by barolo
Never mind, deleted it,. (log)
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Cheers,

Anne

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1 hour ago, barolo said:

Based on what @Kasia, who posted the recipe, said, this looks look like it would do the trick:  https://www.amazon.ca/Pearce-Duffs-Assorted-Blancmange-146g/dp/B0051C0Q92

Indeed but at $20 per ($9.99 + $9.99 shipping)  that is an expensive proposition!

 

Edited to add:

 

 In 2008 according to this, a package of  powder cost 64P in the UK. 

Edited by Anna N (log)

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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45 minutes ago, heidih said:

 

So, which Oetker would you purchase as a substitute for this recipe?

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5 hours ago, oli said:

 

So, which Oetker would you purchase as a substitute for this recipe?

 

Erm, if I wanted to go with this recipe, I'd just use Jello brand pudding mix (for me the sugar free) and make it to the pie filling directions, which uses less milk and sets up firmer. I actually like this better than my own homemade, because I'm not a fan of the skin that forms on homemade puddings. To some that is the best part, but not for me.

 

I use Jello pudding to make Southern style banana pudding. They make a banana flavor, which I have tried, but it tastes artificial, and the real bananas with the regular vanilla one bring plenty of natural fragrance and flavor to the party. I like to let it chill for about twenty four hours to let the 'Nilla wafers (generic at half the cost for me) soften and the banana flavor permeate everything. Jello chocolate pudding sets up into a pie that can be sliced and served neatly for chocolate pie too when made with the reduced milk pie filling formula.

 

Like @Kasia, I think this substitution would work just fine. It won't be blancmange, but it will work.

 

If anyone's interested, I'd be willing to transcribe a pretty interesting history of blancmange from my old "Joy of Cooking" about how it morphed from capon breast, almonds, cornstarch, breadcrumbs into vanilla pudding, still going by the same name. At one point some years back the name was dropped completely in this country, and only older folks have even heard of it.

 

I really think this will work fine @oli. Good luck with it.

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> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

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Okay, I found my study notes and the method using ground almonds is quite complicated and appears outdated. However, I found in "Nell Heaton's Cooking Dictionary", which contains no publishing date or copyright but has my mothers note that she was given the book in what appears to be 1948, the following two recipes for "Blancmange":

image.thumb.jpeg.8535f9418d85fcf1d6f358c87eda46d4.jpeg

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Cape Town - At the foot of a flat topped mountain with a tablecloth covering it.

Some time ago we had Johnny Cash, Bob Hope and Steve Jobs. Now we have no Cash, no Hope and no Jobs. Please don't let Kevin Bacon die.

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On 9/1/2017 at 0:35 AM, Thanks for the Crepes said:

Another story that convinces me I do not ever need a mandoline. :/

I love mine. But I'm scared to death of it. I use it with the handguard and while wearing a silicone oven glove. This after slicing a layer off the underside of my ring finger.

 

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Despite my misadventure I still use them regularly. Sure, they can be dangerous but I've also cut myself with knives (and countertops and piping tips...what can I say, I'm talented) and have burnt myself on any number of things. Cooking customarily involves heat and sharp edges, so the odd bit of ancillary damage to the cook is all but inescapable. 

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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I have actually managed to cut myself (and created a major bone bruise) on my knuckle while wearing a no-cut glove.

I now am even more careful when cutting hard veg like sweet potato, rutabaga and beet.

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7 hours ago, pastrygirl said:

 

Maybe something like Birds Custard Powder?  A U.K. product, but I know I've seen it in the U.S. 

I'm sure it would work but it would be a very different flavour profile. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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