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Your Daily Sweets: What Are You Making and Baking? (2017 – )


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18 hours ago, rarerollingobject said:

Made a similar version of this not long ago, but improved the flavours this time; Monday office cake; a three layer pistachio and Cara Cara orange dacquoise, filled with blackberry curd, crystallised pistachios, freeze-dried pineapple and almond mascarpone meringue cream, topped with dehydrated pineapple flowers brushed in yuzu syrup. 

 

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Looks good!

 

Your sponge looks a lot different from the dacquoises I'm used to making - would you mind sharing the recipe?

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I always have a lot of left over egg shells from all my baking, so I've started experimenting with things I can turn them into; first, I painted their insides dusty rose pink and amethyst, and gold/copper leafed their outsides.

 

I figure I can use them as some kind of cake decoration.

 

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And part 2 of said experiments; cutting a small hole in the bottom of an egg, draining the yolk and white and washing it out, letting it dry completely for a few days; piping the shell full with liquid praline, sealing the hole, letting it set and painting the egg gold.

 

Ergo, sum; gilded praline hard-boiled eggs.

 

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They both look like nice ways to repurpose waste but I'm more a fan of the second idea. I've never been big on putting décor on cakes and other desserts that can't be eaten. I know lots of people do and I'm not suggesting they shouldn't... just not a fan of it myself. It's role as the container with the praline offsets that little peeve of mine so it's my favorite of the two.

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It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Two loaves of banana bread. One was  destined for my son-in-law  after he fixed my icemaker.  He didn't fix it but I think I did.  Oh well I'll still give him the banana bread. :D

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

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11 hours ago, Kasia said:

 Today "slimmed down" pancakes - tasty, healthy (may pancakes be healthy :D ?) and easy to make. The point is the usage of granary flour  RecipeGullet

 

 

 

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I'm not familiar with the term "granary flour". Could you please describe what this is? The pancakes look delicious!

MelissaH

Oswego, NY

Chemist, writer, hired gun

Say this five times fast: "A big blue bucket of blue blueberries."

foodblog1 | kitchen reno | foodblog2

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Our employee fun committee hosts a monthly event, usually a lunch, at which the main meal is supplied and staff contribute desserts and sides and such. We had one on the schedule for today and just lately realized it coincided with EclipseMania (only 72% totality here in Buffalo, but still...). Inspired by the Eclipse thread, I went on the hunt for Moon Pie recipes. Using the cookie recipe from The Chew and the filling recipe from Serious Eats, these turned out pretty good. The cookie is wonderful - kind of a shortbread with a small amount of graham cracker crumbs - crumbly and a little salty, and the marshmallow filling piped beautifully and set quickly without a lot of rubbery marshmallowiness.

 

I coated the dark ones with confectioners coating, because I had some reasonably decent stuff I bought from Albert Uster some time ago for another project. As much as I don't care for those melty wafers, I have to say the finished product really works in a nostalgic, Ho-Ho kind of way. Made me wish I had white wafers, because the tempered white chocolate cracked all to bits as it crystallized and the marshmallow filling (flavored with white peach puree) just pushed right back. Still, I suspect they'll all be eaten.

 

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Patty

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On 8/20/2017 at 2:07 AM, MelissaH said:

I'm not familiar with the term "granary flour". Could you please describe what this is? The pancakes look delicious!

 

Dear @MelissaH I dove deep into the internet and I am a bit confused. After my research it looks like there is no such a flour in English speaking countries except England. The famous uncle google says that there is no possibility to buy it in USA. In Poland it is easy to purchase and may be called (or translated into English as a wholemeal flour). The English definitions I have found on the forums are following:

 

Wholemeal flour - A flour that contains the germ and bran of the kernel. Such as whole wheat flour, whole spelt flour. Provides more nutrients but a different taste that white.

 

Malted bread flour
Also known as ‘granary flour’, this has a nutty taste and is slightly darker in colour. It is essentially a white flour with added flakes of malted wheat.

 

 

You have to look into internet on your own to better understand the structure of this product. I attach only few links which I find as probably useful for you:

 

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/19833/can-someone-explain-these-flours-me

http://www.dictionary.com/browse/granary-flour

http://paulhollywood.com/baking-know-how/ingredients/

http://forum.foodlovers.co.nz/read.php?3,21638

 

 

Producers in England:

https://www.shipton-mill.com/baking/how-to-bake/glossary/granary.htm

 

There are many more of course.

 

I hope it helps.

 

Kasia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Kasia Warsaw/Poland

www.home-madepatchwork.com

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7 hours ago, patris said:

 

I coated the dark ones with confectioners coating, because I had some reasonably decent stuff I bought from Albert Uster some time ago for another project. As much as I don't care for those melty wafers, I have to say the finished product really works in a nostalgic, Ho-Ho kind of way.

 


That's something I've been working on coming to grips with for a while now. I went through the phase where I thought everything was better if you always insisted on only using the best possible ingredients and, in a manner of speaking, that's true. But the thing it doesn't take into account is people's taste preferences and memories. Sometimes people don't want to be shown the light or steered down a different path. Sometimes they just want what they like. If a Moon Pie is nothing at all like what the person eating it associates with a Moon Pie, what's the point of calling it a Moon Pie? All of which is just a long-winded way to say, I don't feel your disclaimer regarding the chocolate coating is required. If the result is good, that's all that matters. :D

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It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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13 hours ago, shain said:

Dorayaki 

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shain,

 

Many of us here, OK maybe just me, have no idea what dorayaki might be. I'd be interested to hear your elaboration of how you made this and how it tastes.

 

God help me, I was thinking McDonald's hamburger when I first saw the photos. :)

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> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

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@Thanks for the Crepes The pancakes are essentialy sponge cakes, so they are soft but heafty with an eggy flavor, I reduced the sugar called for in the recpie, so they where sweet, but not cloying. The edges are crisp while fresh, and tastes a little like waffle cone. The filling is more nutty than it is beany, somewhat akin to chestnuts. I pureed most of it and kept some beans whole. It's a little sticky and I found it to work well with the pancakes. I also added chopped  peanuts to one and quite enjoyed it. 

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~ Shai N.

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Beautiful photos everyone! Here are a few of my latest. Fruit turnovers or mini pop tarts, mini cream horns, and a 65th birthday cake complete with numbered sparklers I found in a small chocolate shop on Cape Cod! Pink champagne cake (I had to make it non-alcoholic) with raspberry jam and raspberry mousse filling and white chocolate buttercream.

Thanks for looking!

Ruth

fruittarts.jpg

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Birthday cake for my dear father ^_^

Pistachio and mocha mousse cake - bottom layer is flourless dark chocolate brownie with chopped pistachio. Middle is white chocolate, coffee, vanilla, and some milk chocolate + chocolate flakes. Top is pistachio and white chocolate. Coconut for decoration.

 

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Edited by shain (log)
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~ Shai N.

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More experiments in flavour layering; a cake involving 28 pears.

 

Spiced pear layer cake, filled with pear curd and a caramel made out of reduced pear juice (the juice I squeezed out of the pears I shredded for the cake layers), cream and butter, and frosted with roasted pear and mascarpone buttercream. And then I poached pears in pear nectar and swirled that through the buttercream, and decorated the frosted cake with candied pear wafers (dipped paper-thin slices of whole pear in sugar and dehydrated until they’re toffee). And also pistachio praline in the filling (no pears in that.)

 

Office people were very happy.

 

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And round 2; vanilla bean cupcakes, with fresh pear baked into the mix, the centers cored out and filled with pear caramel, feuilletine and pistachio praline, topped with that roasted and reduced pear buttercream, and decorated with a candied pear wafer.

 

But the impressive part of all that is that even despite losing a significant portion of my fingertip to the mandoline when slicing the pears and bleeding non stop for five hours and eventually requiring proper medical attention, I still managed to get my eyeliner on more or less straight the next day, bloodied stump notwithstanding. This is my bandaged mandoline stump. :(

 

Is a serious mandoline injury the sign of a TRUE eGulleter?

 

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Edited by rarerollingobject (log)
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6 hours ago, rarerollingobject said:

But the impressive part of all that is that even despite losing a significant portion of my fingertip to the mandoline when slicing the pears and bleeding non stop for five hours and eventually requiring proper medical attention, I still managed to get my eyeliner on more or less straight the next day, bloodied stump notwithstanding. This is my bandaged mandoline stump. :(

 

Is a serious mandoline injury the sign of a TRUE eGulleter?

 

 

Yup. Five hours of prep with a chunk out of your finger is officially hardcore. 

 

I took a serious chunk out of a finger one night during service, when I was working alone and had nobody to cover for me. Fortunately one of the in-laws of the building's owner was an RN, and had me bandaged up in a trice (and I only needed to throw out about 1/2 cup of vegetables, because I had the foresight to injure myself on about the fifth stroke of the mando).

 

The irony is that I *was* using the hand-guard...I was taking round slices from the end of something or other (I forget if it was a carrot or a zucchini, but that's immaterial) and the veg caught on the lip at the top of the mando because I'd pulled it too far back. The little finger of the hand holding the hand-guard slammed into the blade, and a slice almost 1/4" (1/2 cm) in diameter got left behind. It healed up well enough, but it was almost 2 years before I got back the feeling in that fingertip. 

Edited by chromedome (log)
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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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