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Your Daily Sweets: What Are You Making and Baking? (2017 – )


pjm333
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I made a roasted strawberry and cream cheesecake for Memorial Day dessert and it was not a complete success:

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It all tasted great, but I'm guessing it was under cooked because the strawberry layer was not firm.  It had more of a custard texture.  I've made this before and it worked great.  Also, the top layer or plain cheesecake was fine.  It passed the "wiggle test", but I've never really trusted that anyway.  I read somewhere that cheesecake should be 150F when done - does that sound right?  Any ideas?  Here is the recipe if you want to look at it.  

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37 minutes ago, Kim Shook said:

I made a roasted strawberry and cream cheesecake for Memorial Day dessert and it was not a complete success:

IMG_6086.jpg.2c0ab4d97b625953354522032786ce69.jpg

 

IMG_6087.jpg.5ce858fac8052129ba48f612f8a92a99.jpg

It all tasted great, but I'm guessing it was under cooked because the strawberry layer was not firm.  It had more of a custard texture.  I've made this before and it worked great.  Also, the top layer or plain cheesecake was fine.  It passed the "wiggle test", but I've never really trusted that anyway.  I read somewhere that cheesecake should be 150F when done - does that sound right?  Any ideas?  Here is the recipe if you want to look at it.  

Looks absolutely perfect and delicious to me!

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i grew up with black walnuts and consequently enjoy them quite a bit - but many don’t and they can be difficult to find in quality. as for french toast, imo it’s basically bread pudding for breakfast. which i’m mostly fine with, haha. 

 

for content: we recently acquired a new gas grill and with it being hot as the dickens outside, i’ve been trying some baking in it outside. buttermilk scones with cranberries and pecans. they would have had chocolate but somehow i’ve lost the big rubbermaid tote with all my chocolate stuff in it. 

 

 

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Made a gluten and dairy free dessert for some new parents in our church congregation yesterday:

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The bottom layer was made up of dates, pecans, coconut oil, and salt. The chocolate layer is cocoa, coconut oil, and maple syrup.  Then some of that top layer that is held back is sprinkled over the cocoa layer.  The flavor was quite good, but they are very crumbly and have to stay in the fridge until you serve them.  I will certainly make these again for my GF friends and family.  I think they would be good with a scoop of ice cream. 

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I started making clafoutis about 10 years ago and every spring try to make a new version of the clafouit.  Cherry is where I begin just as the cherries in the central area of Washington come into season.  The biggest orchards are in Wenatchee, WA.  This recipe starts with my basic shortbread dough.  I like the butter flavor and firm texture and it's so easy to make.  This season I used my standard recipe, but instead of Kirsch, I soaked the cherries overnight in Amaretto.  Then added sliced almonds on top to get toasted during the baking.  So easy to make and so delicious each year.

Amaretto Cherry Clafouti.JPG

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46 minutes ago, TdeV said:

@David Ross, that pie looks scrumptious! I really want a slice. 😋

Could you provide your basic shortbread dough recipe, please?

Very easy and I've made it for years.  Thanks for asking:

 

Shortbread Crust-

1 ½ cups all-purpose flour

⅔ cup powdered sugar

12 tbsp. melted butter

 

In a bowl combine the flour, powdered sugar and melted butter and stir to combine until the mixture forms a soft dough ball. Press the dough into a tart pan with your fingers, pressing out to the edges.  Trim off any dough with a paring knife.  If I'm making a tart with fruit with a lot of liquid, scatter some of those trimmed dough pieces over the fruit.  It soaks up the juice and makes a sort of crumb topping. This is a technique Robuchon used in his cherry clafoutis recipe.

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Somewhat inspired by galatopita and galaktoboureko.

Phyllo cups lightly flavored with cinnamon and rosemary, butter and a bit of sugar and salt.

Filling is a custard of semolina, milk and butter, flavored with vanilla.

Topped with a caramel syrup flavored with rosemary and orange, a bit of cinnamon.

Toasted pine nuts.

 

 

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~ Shai N.

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On 6/12/2021 at 10:41 AM, David Ross said:

I started making clafoutis about 10 years ago and every spring try to make a new version of the clafouit.  Cherry is where I begin just as the cherries in the central area of Washington come into season.  The biggest orchards are in Wenatchee, WA.  This recipe starts with my basic shortbread dough.  I like the butter flavor and firm texture and it's so easy to make.  This season I used my standard recipe, but instead of Kirsch, I soaked the cherries overnight in Amaretto.  Then added sliced almonds on top to get toasted during the baking.  So easy to make and so delicious each year.

Amaretto Cherry Clafouti.JPG

Looks great and soaking them in Amaretto is what I do. I bet yours tasted wonderful.

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13 minutes ago, oli said:

Looks great and soaking them in Amaretto is what I do. I bet yours tasted wonderful.

It is delicious.  Sometimes I soak the cherries in Kirsch or a local cherry brandy.  Amaretto is probably my favorite for the cherries.

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On 6/12/2021 at 10:41 AM, David Ross said:

I started making clafoutis about 10 years ago and every spring try to make a new version of the clafouit.  Cherry is where I begin just as the cherries in the central area of Washington come into season.  The biggest orchards are in Wenatchee, WA.  This recipe starts with my basic shortbread dough.  I like the butter flavor and firm texture and it's so easy to make.  This season I used my standard recipe, but instead of Kirsch, I soaked the cherries overnight in Amaretto.  Then added sliced almonds on top to get toasted during the baking.  So easy to make and so delicious each year.

Amaretto Cherry Clafouti.JPG

Shortbread Crust-

1 ½ cups all-purpose flour

½ cup powdered sugar

12 tbsp. butter, melted

 

Cherry Clafouti Batter-

1 ½ lbs. pitted Bing cherries

⅓ cup Amaretto, (Italian almond liqueur) substitute German Kirsch or cherry brandy

3 tbsp. all-purpose flour

½ tsp. salt

¼ cup granulated sugar

4 large eggs

2 egg yolks

1 cup whole milk

1 cup heavy cream

¼ vanilla bean substitute ½ tsp. pure vanilla extract

½ cup sliced almonds

¼ cup powdered sugar for dusting

 

For Shortbread Crust-

-Heat the oven to 350. In a bowl, combine the flour, powdered sugar and melted butter and stir to combine and make a dough.

-Using your fingers pat the dough into the bottom of a 9" round non-stick tart pan with removable bottom. Use a paring knife to trim the excess pastry from the edge of the tart pan. Save the pastry crumbs. Prick the crust all over with a fork to help keep the crust from rising while baking. Another great technique is to put a sheet of parchment on the dough and add some pie weights.

-Par-bake the crust just until it is set and just starts to brown, about 10 minutes.

 

Cherry Clafouti Batter and Baking-

-Place the cherries in a glass bowl or plastic container. Don't use a metal bowl as it will react with the liqueur. Pour in the Amaretto liqueur and toss the cherries. Let the cherries steep in the liqueur for at least one hour at room temperature or covered in the fridge overnight.

-Heat the oven to 375.

-Add the flour, salt and sugar to a mixing bowl. With the mixer running, add the whole eggs, egg yolks milk and cream and blend on low speed. Cut the vanilla bean and scrape the seeds into the batter, or pour in the vanilla extract. Mix the batter again to incorporate the vanilla.

-Drain the cherries from the liqueur, Reserve the liqueur for making cocktails and sauces. Arrange the cherries in a single layer in the shortbread crust.

-Pour the batter over the cherries up to about ¼" from the rim of the tart pan. Using the trimmed pastry crust, and sprinkle the bits over the cherries and batter. The pastry crumbs help thicken the batter during baking and add texture to the top of the clafouti. Sprinkle the sliced almonds on top or the cherries.

-Bake the clafouti in the oven until the top is browned and the custard is set, about 40 minutes. Remove the clafouti from the oven and place on a cookie rack. Let the clafouti cool 10 minutes, then unmold from the outer tart shell ring. Cool before serving.

-When the clafouti is cooled to room temperature, dust with powdered sugar and cut into slices. Serve the clafouti with whipped cream or vanilla ice cream.

(like the clafouti for breakfast)

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Thanks for the details @David Rosshrough a phase of doting on Maraska cherry wine. That might be a nice switch for the liquor though less alcoholic. That stuff BTW killer in marinades.

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27 minutes ago, heidih said:

Thanks for the details @David Rosshrough a phase of doting on Maraska cherry wine. That might be a nice switch for the liquor though less alcoholic. That stuff BTW killer in marinades.

I know it's delicious.  I've got a bottle of Luxardo maraschino liqueur I might try mascerating some cherries, but it could be too sweet.

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30 minutes ago, David Ross said:

I know it's delicious.  I've got a bottle of Luxardo maraschino liqueur I might try mascerating some cherries, but it could be too sweet.

Right - sugar balancing required. Now I am eyeing the Bings in the fridge.

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Tommorrow I'll make another one of my favorites with cherries, the crostatta.  I love these easy pastries that don't take a lot of work.  The crostatta is basically just cherries on a circle of pie crust that you fold up the edges and the center is open.  Delicious.

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16 hours ago, TdeV said:

@shain, wow!

Can you please give us a recipe for that?

 

Thanks and sure. Though please take into account that this recipe is under development - it was good but needed some balancing which I include below but haven't tried.

 

Recipe makes for 10 cups in a muffin tin, though I would try to make it in a single circular pan next time.

 

Custard:

  • 40 g semolina
  • 270g milk
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 tsp of fresh rosemary leaves, finely minced or ground to a powder
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1/8 tsp salt
  • ~~~~
  • Cook semolina with milk until thickened.
  • Chill as to not curdle the egg and mix in the remaining ingredients.

Phyllo cups / crust:

  • 3 standard size thin phyllo sheets
  • apx 15g butter, melted
  • apx 15g water
  • a large pinch of salt
  • 1/4 tsp sugar
  • apx 1/6 tsp cinnamon
  • ~~~~
  • Mix butter, water, salt, cinnamon and sugar.
  • I suggest you look for videos of people making phyllo cups or crusts, it will be clearer than any explanation I can provide.
  • Cut the phyllo sheets to size. For muffins cups, that each sheet cut into 16 (4x4).
  • Brush with the butter mixture and line the tray.
  • Brush with any remaining butter.
  • Bake at 170 dC until golden and crisp, but not dark (since it will be baked again).

Syrup:

  • 100 g sugat
  • apx 30 g water (2 tbsp)
  • .
  • another apx 30 g water (2 tbsp)
  • apx 1 tsp butter
  • apx 30 g orange juice (2 tbsp)
  • 1/3 tsp orange zest
  • .
  • orange blossom water to taste (optional)
  • ~~~~
  • Cook the sugar with water until a medium-light caramel forms.
  • Add butter and 2nd amount of water, orange juice, zest, orange blossom water.

Finish:

  • Mix roughly half of the caramel into the semolina mixture.
  • Fill the cups / crust.
  • Bake at 170dC until the custard is set and phyllo is deeply golden, apx 20-25 minutes.
  • Top with remaining caramel.
  • Top with some toasted pine nuts (or hazelnuts, almonds, etc).
  • IMO it's best when still warm.
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~ Shai N.

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@shain, could you please provide a title for this recipe? 😋

 

Edited to add, this is the title I used:

Phyllo cups lightly flavored with cinnamon & rosemary, semolina custard filling, topped with caramel and pinenuts | Shai N @ eGullet

Edited by TdeV (log)
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39 minutes ago, TdeV said:

@shain, could you please provide a title for this recipe? 😋

 

Edited to add, this is the title I used:

Phyllo cups lightly flavored with cinnamon & rosemary, semolina custard filling, topped with caramel and pinenuts | Shai N @ eGullet

 

(Bastardized) galaktoboureko with orange caramel and rosemary 😆

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~ Shai N.

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20 hours ago, Darienne said:

@David Ross  I have a bag of sweet red cherries in the freezer.  Can I use them in either of these two desserts?  

Yes. I just thawed a bag of Bing cherries I kept from last season.  The texture of the cherries will be softer, but for the recipes it doesn't make much difference when you taste it.  

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Made these incredible cookie 'sticks' this afternoon - Tahini Chocolate Chip Cookie Sticks.  A recipe from Melinda Strauss  click, which I watched her demonstrate on Jamie Geller's Facebook page while not working what I was supposed to be working at this afternoon.   Nothing fancy, but very tasty.  Made from only tahini, eggs, maple syrup with a bit of baking soda.  Like magic.  

 

 

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Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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