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pjm333

Your Daily Sweets: What Are You Making and Baking? (2017 – )

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3 hours ago, pjm333 said:

 

To each his own I guess, I sell over 100 of these a week at $15.00 each.

 

Dang! Nice! Grats Man.

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A slab of Dana Cree's Nutterbutters (although I think they're now known as Nutterbuddys).

 

Nutterbutters.thumb.jpg.3095072bfdef5228eb6d7a82a14a8c96.jpg

 

The base is peanut butter and chocolate, with cocoa nibs and feuilletine for texture. The top is white chocolate caramel ganache (oh the bubbles! 😭).

 

Very moreish. Highly recommended. Recipe here. (And a bit more backstory here, if you like that sort of thing).

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58 minutes ago, Pete Fred said:

A slab of Dana Cree's Nutterbutters (although I think they're now known as Nutterbuddys).

 

Nutterbutters.thumb.jpg.3095072bfdef5228eb6d7a82a14a8c96.jpg

 

The base is peanut butter and chocolate, with cocoa nibs and feuilletine for texture. The top is white chocolate caramel ganache (oh the bubbles! 😭).

 

Very moreish. Highly recommended. Recipe here. (And a bit more backstory here, if you like that sort of thing).

 

These look fantastic! I have developed a habit over the last year of always having a bin of some confection or other sitting on my desk for my colleagues to enjoy - my job is fairly solitary so it encourages people to stop by my office to chat and often results in some good collaborative work - and I think I now know what the next treat will be. I imagine they will be delicious dipped in chocolate.

 

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Made this riff on King Cake for Fat Tuesday. My kids loved the sprinkles, me not so much 😂

20190304_155348.jpg

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22 hours ago, Pete Fred said:

A slab of Dana Cree's Nutterbutters (although I think they're now known as Nutterbuddys).

 

Nutterbutters.thumb.jpg.3095072bfdef5228eb6d7a82a14a8c96.jpg

 

The base is peanut butter and chocolate, with cocoa nibs and feuilletine for texture. The top is white chocolate caramel ganache (oh the bubbles! 😭).

 

Very moreish. Highly recommended. Recipe here. (And a bit more backstory here, if you like that sort of thing).

 

At some point one of the major cookie-makers had a peanut butter cookie called the Nutterbutter, so I suspect that's why the name got changed.

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Another bite-size treat from Dana Cree... Coconut Haystack Cookies.

 

1832252450_CoconutHaystackCookies1.thumb.jpg.a61c0365e3dabb6866b3e5ce272ca936.jpg

 

I have no idea if I made them correctly. The method is a new one on me: make a butter/sugar emulsion, incorporate whole egg and (dessicated) coconut, cook the mixture on the hob, chill the dough, roll into balls (10g for me), bake. There was plenty of guesswork on my part as to how each step should look or feel.

 

1605262998_CoconutHaystackCookies2.jpg.dfb6445658d52c5be28d59b832b3e863.jpg

 

Anyway, I really liked them. Best served warm, I think. Initially very buttery, with caramel notes from the bottoms, then finishing strongly with coconut. Quite different from your regular macaroon. Once cooled, they're more dense and chewy, the butteriness somewhat lessened.

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Pete Fred said:

There was plenty of guesswork on my part as to how each step should look or feel.

This most definitely calls for a video so one can more easily grasp the consistency one is aiming for at each step.  

 After reading the recipe I’m impressed with your fearlessness.  For now, though,  I think I will stick with much easier coconut macaroons.:)

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I love macaroons, but this intrigues me.

 

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Pop Tarts

1. Chocolate Cream Cheese

2. Nutella Cream Cheese

3. Raspberry Cream Cheese

pop tarts1.jpg

pop tarts 2.jpg

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Apparently on Friday it was the Hungarian Independence Day, so it's only natural to break out one of the great Austro-Hungarian classics :D

 

Dobostorte

 

Dobostorte.thumb.jpg.2d78bb3c520525a8ce244e7538c0c221.jpg

 

Almond crunch

Biscuits à la cuillère (lady's fingers?) soaked in apricot schnapps

Milk chocolate and caramel chantilly

Crispy crepe

Almonds

 

It's a cake I used to make a lot when I first starting baking, but it's been seven or eight years since the last one.  Traditionally, you would use chocolate butter cream, no crunch layer and at least six layers of sponge, but I prefer something a bit lighter now.

 

I still haven't figured out how to make the mandatory fan pattern look elegant, though.  Traditionally, it's another layer of biscuit covered in hard caramel, but it's a bit unwieldy and not very pleasant to eat.  A quick Google image search will show you what I mean.  I though a crepe might work, but it's lacking something - and while a chocolate décor may look OK and fit the cake, I'm against them in principle.

 

I'll go back to the drawing board with this one.

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An old restaurant adage says "when in doubt, put a tuile". Probably it can be applied to your case.

(I love dobos torte and think it should be much more present in pastry showcases)

 

 

 

Teo

 

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Now you have sent me down the rabbit hole to find mom's recipe. Love it! Somewhere in this house...

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9 hours ago, teonzo said:

An old restaurant adage says "when in doubt, put a tuile". Probably it can be applied to your case.

(I love dobos torte and think it should be much more present in pastry showcases)

 

 

 

I have since thought about a tuile, but I think you'd run into the same issue as with the caramel or the crepe - humidity.

 

The ideal, I think, would be some kind of caramel opaline tuile to refer back to the classic, but coated with cocoa butter to keep it crisp.  I don't think I have the resources to do that elegantly, though.

 

Do you know whether Florentines are badly affected by humidity?  If not, they might have the finesse, crunch and flavour profile for the cake.

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7 hours ago, jmacnaughtan said:

I have since thought about a tuile, but I think you'd run into the same issue as with the caramel or the crepe - humidity.

 

The ideal, I think, would be some kind of caramel opaline tuile to refer back to the classic, but coated with cocoa butter to keep it crisp.  I don't think I have the resources to do that elegantly, though.

 

Do you know whether Florentines are badly affected by humidity?  If not, they might have the finesse, crunch and flavour profile for the cake.

 

I can't think about something that would remain crispy (without absorbing humidity) and does not involve chocolate...

Florentines have the same trouble, you should be forced to coat the bottom side in chocolate.

 

I would suggest you to use the tuile nougatine / orange tuile / lace tuile family. I never understood if this family has a coded name in French pastry, I always found it described with a boatload of different names (Ducasse calls it tuile nougatine in his pastry book, but I'm sure I've seen it with different names in other French books), so I don't think there is one. I mean the kind of tuiles you can see in this photo and in this other photo. In my opinion it would fit dobos torte much better than a tuile made with pâte à tulipe: the lace effect is really elegant; it gets a good caramel flavour; it's really thin and easy to bite (contrary to the traditional caramel). It cuts neatly while warm, so you can cook a big tuile that covers the cake, cut the round shape and then the segments. Unless you are as quick as Flash it will harden before being able to cut all the pieces, you just need to put it back in the oven for some seconds. You must coat it with cocoa butter, but you don't need an air compressor, just sift some Mycryo on both sides, not a big effort that asks for equipment you don't have, unless you want to be "traditional" in the techniques you use.

The basic tuile nougatine recipe is pretty eclectic: you can add cocoa powder or instant coffee or spices to the batter; you can add chopped nuts / seeds; you can use whatever honey you like; you can sub the orange juice with other fruit juices, or just with water. Plenty of ways to change taste/color and add crispness, while maintaning the lace effect and the thinness.

EDIT: never cut tuiles on a hot silpat, unless you want to destroy the silpat (it cuts as butter while hot). Always use parchment paper for this use. I'm sure you know this since you are a professional, but it's better to point this out if some reader wants to try it.

 

 

 

Teo

 


Edited by teonzo (log)

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1 hour ago, teonzo said:

I would suggest you to use the tuile nougatine / orange tuile / lace tuile family.

 

Thanks for the tip.  This is not something I do a lot of - do you have a reliable recipe?

 

I've generally tended to avoid tuiles since having to stand and roll them for hours in front of a roaring bread oven... 😓

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I'm a donkey, I forgot to write the recipe, sorry.

 

-------------------

 

Here is the last one I used:

 

50 g        butter
125 g     sugar
50 g       orange juice
35 g       flour (low gluten, the one used for cookies)
120 g     ground almonds

 

Mix butter (soft), sugar and orange juice just enough to combine. Add flour and ground almonds, mix just enough to combine.

Deposit on a pan lined with parchment paper, cook at 160° C for about 8-10 minutes (don't trust the timer, trust your eyes since the cooking time can vary a lot from case to case). You can adjust oven temperature and cooking time to get the color you want (they can range from light brown to dark brown, as for caramel).

This batter freezes great: I freeze it after rolling it in a log (spread the batter on a sheet of parchment paper, then roll the log by hand keeping it inside the paper, at room temperature this batter is really soft), then cut thin slices from the frozen log. Otherwise you can use a scoop to deposit it.

Beware it spreads a lot while cooking, especially if you deposit it with a scoop. If you need a large circle like in this case, then I suggest to cut many thin and small slices, then depositing them at a distance on the pan (about 2 cm one from each other, this depends on how big the slices are). Slices will spread and merge during cooking. Avoid depositing a big mound, it will cook unevenly giving poor results.

 

You can sub sugar with honey. You can sub orange juice with whatever liquid you want. You can sub part of the flour with cocoa powder (on average I'd say 10 g cocoa powder and 25 g flour). You can sub the ground almonds with whatever dry ingredient you like (nuts, seeds...).

 

 

-------------------

 

Here is the one by Ducasse:

 

100 g      sugar

100 g      glucose syrup

100 g      butter

100 g      ground almonds

 

Put sugar, glucose syrup and butter in a pan, bring to the boil. Turn off the heat, add the ground almonds. Deposit on a pan, cook at 180° C until they are colored.

 

 

-------------------

 

 

 

Teo

 

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Dorie Greenspan's Moroccan Semolina and Almond Cookies.

 

1056149069_SemolinaAlmondCookies.thumb.jpg.f719de781d970374e19713aa683e98d6.jpg


They look quite pretty but I don't think I'll be bothering again. Couldn't taste the citrus (lemon zest, orange blossom) and the texture was quite dry and cakey. I have no idea how the NYT could describe them as "moist and rich". Each to their own, I guess.

 

129215127_SemolinaAlmondCookie.thumb.jpg.24b141512b8f23e23c3acbee3f1ad7f3.jpg

 

I asked myself what would a Moroccan do in this instance, and ended up dunking them in a cup of tea, which improved matters no end.

 


Edited by Pete Fred Spelling. Oops. (log)
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1 hour ago, Pete Fred said:

Dorie Greenspan's Moroccan Semolina and Almond Cookies.

 

1056149069_SemolinaAlmondCookies.thumb.jpg.f719de781d970374e19713aa683e98d6.jpg


They look quite pretty but I don't think I'll be bothering again. Couldn't taste the citrus (lemon zest, orange blossom) and the texture was quite dry and cakey. I have no idea how the NYT could describe them as "moist and rich". Each to their own, I guess.

 

129215127_SemolinaAlmondCookie.thumb.jpg.24b141512b8f23e23c3acbee3f1ad7f3.jpg

 

I asked myself what would a Moroccan do in this instance, and ended up dunking them in a cup of tea, which improved matters no end.

 

 

This is usually when I pipe up with my typical response: "Well, you always make a trifle from them." :laugh:

They do look quite nice. 

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