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pjm333

Your Daily Sweets: What Are You Making and Baking? (2017 – )

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Wonderful looking desserts on this thread! Here are a couple of my latest bakes - a red velvet birthday cake and watermelon sugar cookies for a memorial day bbq. Thanks for looking! Ruth

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redvelvet.jpg

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This WOULD have been a beautiful Meyer lemon and elderflower tart, had I not tripped over one of my three hooligan dogs while transporting it from the oven to the bench. >:(

 

IMG_5911.thumb.JPG.c9fb69af2166a0cf69dfc7d4a81a55c5.JPG

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Ouch!


Edited by Anna N (log)
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21 minutes ago, rarerollingobject said:

This WOULD have been a beautiful Meyer lemon and elderflower tart, had I not tripped over one of my three hooligan dogs while transporting it from the oven to the bench. >:(

 

IMG_5911.thumb.JPG.c9fb69af2166a0cf69dfc7d4a81a55c5.JPG

I am sure your language was very lady-like. Please subscribe your hooligan dogs to the forum as we awaite feedback on flavour and texture.

 

I had the same problem the other day - I was removing one of two trays of tarts from the oven and it caught on a corner, resulting in the three tarts upsid-down on the floor. I do not have dogs to blame - only myself! My language was not to be repeated.

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1 hour ago, rarerollingobject said:

This WOULD have been a beautiful Meyer lemon and elderflower tart, had I not tripped over one of my three hooligan dogs while transporting it from the oven to the bench. >:(

 

IMG_5911.thumb.JPG.c9fb69af2166a0cf69dfc7d4a81a55c5.JPG

When life gives you a smashed lemon tart, make TRIFLE!

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Got sad about my dropped lemon and elderflower tart, so woke up early and made a rhubarb upside down cake, glazed with strawberry syrup. At 4am. As you do.

 

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Rhubarb muffins with crumble topping and lemon icing

 

My children love muffins. This year to give them joy on Children's Day I prepared fluffy, moist muffins with rhubarb, a crunchy crumble topping and lemon icing. They were excellent and everybody, not only the children, liked them.

 

Ingredients (12 muffins)
dough
250g of flour
1 teaspoon of baking powder
half a teaspoon of baking soda
150g of brown sugar
1 teaspoon of vanilla essence
250ml of milk
60ml of oil
1 egg
a pinch of salt
crumble topping
40g of butter
80g of flour
40g of caster sugar
other ingredients:
3 long sticks of rhubarb
2 tablespoons of brown sugar
icing
6 tablespoons of caster sugar
juice from one lemon


Heat the oven up to 190C. Put some paper muffin moulds into the "dimples" of a baking pan for muffins.
Make the crumble topping: mix all the ingredients and knead them until you have the consistence of wet sand.
Clean the rhubarb, peel it and cut it into 1 cm pieces. Sprinkle with sugar and leave for half an hour.
Mix together the dry ingredients of the muffins: flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Mix together the oil, milk and egg in a separate bowl. Add the egg mixture to the dry ingredients and mix them in.
Put the dough into some paper muffin moulds up to 2/3 of their height, and put the pieces of rhubarb on the top. Sprinkle with the crumble topping. Bake for 20-25 minutes.
Make the icing: mix the lemon juice with the caster sugar.
When the muffins are cold, decorate them with the lemon icing.

 

 

DSC_1436a.jpg


Edited by Kasia (log)
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4 hours ago, Kasia said:

Rhubarb muffins with crumble topping and lemon icing

 

My children love muffins. This year to give them joy on Children's Day I prepared fluffy, moist muffins with rhubarb, a crunchy crumble topping and lemon icing. They were excellent and everybody, not only the children, liked them.

 

Ingredients (12 muffins)
dough
250g of flour
1 teaspoon of baking powder
half a teaspoon of baking soda
150g of brown sugar
1 teaspoon of vanilla essence
250ml of milk
60ml of oil
1 egg
a pinch of salt
crumble topping
40g of butter
80g of flour
40g of caster sugar
other ingredients:
3 long sticks of rhubarb
2 tablespoons of brown sugar
icing
6 tablespoons of caster sugar
juice from one lemon


Heat the oven up to 190C. Put some paper muffin moulds into the "dimples" of a baking pan for muffins.
Make the crumble topping: mix all the ingredients and knead them until you have the consistence of wet sand.
Clean the rhubarb, peel it and cut it into 1 cm pieces. Sprinkle with sugar and leave for half an hour.
Mix together the dry ingredients of the muffins: flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, salt and millet groats. Mix together the oil, milk and egg in a separate bowl. Add the egg mixture to the dry ingredients and mix them in.
Put the dough into some paper muffin moulds up to 2/3 of their height, and put the pieces of rhubarb on the top. Sprinkle with the crumble topping. Bake for 20-25 minutes.
Make the icing: mix the lemon juice with the caster sugar.
When the muffins are cold, decorate them with the lemon icing.

 

 

DSC_1436a.jpg

 

That sounds wonderful. Have never done much with rhubarb, but I saw it at the farmers' market last week....

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7 hours ago, kayb said:

 

That sounds wonderful. Have never done much with rhubarb, but I saw it at the farmers' market last week....

 

@kaybIt is rather popular in Poland, we do a lot of baking with  it (the cakes get more moisture) and use it in summer to prepare refreshing compote

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12 hours ago, Kasia said:

Rhubarb muffins with crumble topping and lemon icing

 

My children love muffins. This year to give them joy on Children's Day I prepared fluffy, moist muffins with rhubarb, a crunchy crumble topping and lemon icing. They were excellent and everybody, not only the children, liked them.

 

Ingredients (12 muffins)
dough
250g of flour
1 teaspoon of baking powder
half a teaspoon of baking soda
150g of brown sugar
1 teaspoon of vanilla essence
250ml of milk
60ml of oil
1 egg
a pinch of salt
crumble topping
40g of butter
80g of flour
40g of caster sugar
other ingredients:
3 long sticks of rhubarb
2 tablespoons of brown sugar
icing
6 tablespoons of caster sugar
juice from one lemon


Heat the oven up to 190C. Put some paper muffin moulds into the "dimples" of a baking pan for muffins.
Make the crumble topping: mix all the ingredients and knead them until you have the consistence of wet sand.
Clean the rhubarb, peel it and cut it into 1 cm pieces. Sprinkle with sugar and leave for half an hour.
Mix together the dry ingredients of the muffins: flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, salt and millet groats. Mix together the oil, milk and egg in a separate bowl. Add the egg mixture to the dry ingredients and mix them in.
Put the dough into some paper muffin moulds up to 2/3 of their height, and put the pieces of rhubarb on the top. Sprinkle with the crumble topping. Bake for 20-25 minutes.
Make the icing: mix the lemon juice with the caster sugar.
When the muffins are cold, decorate them with the lemon icing.

 

 

DSC_1436a.jpg

 

I might give these a go, I have a lot of rhubarb left over! One question; what's the quantity of millet to use? I notice it's in the directions but not the ingredients list. Thanks!

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@rarerollingobject please excuse me and forget the millet it is put in the description by mistake, I have already corrected it in my original post 

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I am not much for baking normally, but the rhubarb was just getting too big and blocking the sun from the blackberries I look forward to harvesting, so strawberry rhubarb pie seemed the logical solution.

HC

IMG_2375.thumb.JPG.5ace4977b44b3b7b61a300e41cd0f741.JPG 

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2 hours ago, HungryChris said:

I am not much for baking normally, but the rhubarb was just getting too big and blocking the sun from the blackberries I look forward to harvesting, so strawberry rhubarb pie seemed the logical solution.

HC

IMG_2375.thumb.JPG.5ace4977b44b3b7b61a300e41cd0f741.JPG 

That is a thing of beauty.  I'm immensely jealous.  I tried to get rhubarb to grow here and I can't do it.

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27 minutes ago, Shelby said:

That is a thing of beauty.  I'm immensely jealous.  I tried to get rhubarb to grow here and I can't do it.

Thank you @Shelby! I am surprised to hear about your rhubarb not growing in Kansas. I worked as a computer programmer for a number of years and my first  mentor, Steff, was a Polish immigrant. In addition to introducing me to many Polish food items, she overheard me say, one day that I wanted some rhubarb and brought in 2 plants from her yard. Steff is no longer  with us, but those plants are, and are kind of special to me.

HC

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Rhubarb can be tricky to grow, the preparation of the soil is important in some places because proper drainage is critical.  you have to dig a very large and deep hole - the size you would use for a small tree with a root ball. The hole has to be filled with a lot of compost and organic material, put rotted manure deep in the hole and then add in compost and leaf mold or loose straw or you can dump in potting mix.  It is best planted in the fall and no harvest the first year.   I used to grow it when I lived down in the valley but I developed an allergy to it and when I decided to sell the house, my neighbors were invited to dig up and transplant my rhubarb and my asparagus to their gardens.  I then planted some bushes in those patches.  

 

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I don't know of anyone growing rhubarb this far south, but it used to be common in Vermont. It grew like a perennial weed up there. I thought it was a cooler climate crop, but certainly may be wrong. I do love it, but we get it very rarely this far south.

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8 hours ago, Thanks for the Crepes said:

I don't know of anyone growing rhubarb this far south, but it used to be common in Vermont. It grew like a perennial weed up there. I thought it was a cooler climate crop, but certainly may be wrong. I do love it, but we get it very rarely this far south.

You are correct. Like asparagus, it requires a hard freeze during the dormant season to do well.  However that can be fixed in moderate climates by dumping a pile of ice on the bed a few times during the winter and covering it with a deep layer of straw and then a tarp.  Mine did not grow as well as it did in colder zones but it did well enough.  The asparagus did better.

One of my husband's relatives worked at Union ice and would bring me 50 pound bags of ice when I needed it.  Late I bought a stand alone ice machine when I started catering.  

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Thanks, Andie.  I think I didn't dig a big enough hole.  That and I bet we didn't have a hard enough freeze that year.  Maybe I'll try again.....

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the strawberry time is back (at least in Poland :)) so last weekend I have prepared one of my favorite cakes - Light strawberry small cake. 

 

Ingredients:

1 kg of strawberries

130g of butter

3 tablespoons of cocoa

100g of rolled oats

6 tablespoons of sugar

4 tablespoons of water

3 teaspoons of gelatin

200g of natural yoghurt

250g of mascarpone

4 tablespoons of caster sugar

200g of longitudinal sponge biscuits

50g of dark chocolate

 

Put the margarine, sugar, water and cocoa into a pot, and boil to combine the ingredients. Add the rolled oats and mix them in. Cool the mixture down slightly. Cover the bottom of a cake tin with the oat-chocolate mass. Cover the sides of the cake tin with the sponge biscuits, slightly pressing them into the mass. Put the cake tin into the fridge. Melt the gelatine in 100 ml of hot water. Blend thoroughly 2/3s of the strawberries. Add the gelatine to them. Whisk the mascarpone, natural yoghurt and caster sugar to make a fluffy mass. Gradually add the blended strawberries and mix them in slightly. Put the strawberry mass on the chocolate base. Leave it in the fridge to congeal. Slice the rest of the strawberries and put them on the cake. You can decorate the cake with ready-made chocolate elements or sprinkle with grated chocolate.

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Edited by Kasia (log)
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On 6/6/2017 at 0:36 PM, andiesenji said:

Rhubarb can be tricky to grow, the preparation of the soil is important in some places because proper drainage is critical.  you have to dig a very large and deep hole - the size you would use for a small tree with a root ball. The hole has to be filled with a lot of compost and organic material, put rotted manure deep in the hole and then add in compost and leaf mold or loose straw or you can dump in potting mix.  It is best planted in the fall and no harvest the first year.   I used to grow it when I lived down in the valley but I developed an allergy to it and when I decided to sell the house, my neighbors were invited to dig up and transplant my rhubarb and my asparagus to their gardens.  I then planted some bushes in those patches.  

 

Used to have it at the end of our property, at the base of hedges in Burnaby.  It would grow like a weed and it was almost hard to get rid of.  We didn't do anything with them, they were there almost like dandelions.

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Pistachio-strawberry dacquoise, recipe loosely adapted from Christophe Michalak. Soft almond dacquoise covered with pistachio paste-infused white chocolate ganache and fresh strawberries glazed with melted strawberry jelly, garnished with crushed pistachios. The ganache gave me some problems - the emulsion kept breaking when I tried to whip it. I'm pretty sure I made an error weighing out my ingredients, using too much white chocolate. In any event, it was delicious.

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