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Your Daily Sweets: What Are You Making and Baking? (2017 – )

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Anna N said:

 

 Had to look it up. Looks intriguing.

A regular Friday meatless meal in my culture. i suppose part ofwhy I embrace sweet and savory at any time of day ;) 


Edited by heidih (log)
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5 minutes ago, heidih said:

A regular Friday meatless meal in my culture. i suppose part ofwhy I embrace sweet and savory at any time of day ;) 

 

Not quite sure what you are saying. So far my reading suggests it is a dessert. So I can’t quite make the connection with a meatless meal. Is there a savoury version?

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And in a Friday meatless culture a sweet treat was sure a bonus to a child

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Consider the “dairy” meal as eaten by Jewish people who observe Kosher dietary laws, blintzes with cheese (farmer, pot, cottage)  would not be uncommon as part of a light meal. Sometimes garnished with a fruit sauce, sometimes a sprinkle of sugar on the top of the rolled up crepe.

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18 hours ago, Anna N said:

 

 Had to look it up. Looks intriguing.


I considered looking it up and then decided to be petty and not do so. I figure it's a discussion forum about food, if you're gonna post something with a name that sounds like I should offer a polite gesundheit, at least give us non-locals some kind of clue as to what it is. :P :D

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Tri2Cook said:


I considered looking it up and then decided to be petty and not do so. I figure it's a discussion forum about food, if you're gonna post something with a name that sounds like I should offer a polite gesundheit, at least give us non-locals some kind of clue as to what it is. :P :D

 

Hence the photos? :)

 

I've never had it, but being a dessert nerd, have heard of it.  Isn't it traditionally cut or torn into small pieces or strips?  My impression was more of a thin crepe cut into wide noodles than a fluffy pancake, but I checked my pastry library and found a recipe in Alford & Duguid's Home Baking that has egg whites whipped an folded in and is described as a 'skillet souffle'.  Which actually sounds like the Dutch Baby that mom occasionally made for a special Sunday breakfast.  These recipes for Dutch Baby have very similar ratios to the kaiserschmarren recipe in the book (with the exception of how the eggs are treated) so maybe I have had it!  (more or less)

https://altonbrown.com/dutch-baby-pancake-recipe/

https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/dutch-baby-with-lemon-sugar-352279

 


Edited by pastrygirl (log)
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34 minutes ago, oli said:

 

Isn't that supposed to be "palacsinta"?

 

I don't know - we didn't spell it - we just ate it ;)  Plus we spoke a German dialect and no Hungarian.

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2 hours ago, Tri2Cook said:

I considered looking it up and then decided to be petty and not do so. I figure it's a discussion forum about food, if you're gonna post something with a name that sounds like I should offer a polite gesundheit, at least give us non-locals some kind of clue as to what it is. :P :D

 

Ha ha, sorry, was I was lazy :P So as I guess you already figured from the discussion, it's sort of a torn apart fluffy pancake thingy. I make them in biggish pieces (2"). 

I served it with quince and coriander preserve, as well as fromage blanc. Most of my family prefer to mix them up as a sauce, but I'm a dipper.

 

1 hour ago, pastrygirl said:

I've never had it, but being a dessert nerd, have heard of it.  Isn't it traditionally cut or torn into small pieces or strips?  My impression was more of a thin crepe cut into wide noodles than a fluffy pancake, but I checked my pastry library and found a recipe in Alford & Duguid's Home Baking that has egg whites whipped an folded in and is described as a 'skillet souffle'.  Which actually sounds like the Dutch Baby that mom occasionally made for a special Sunday breakfast.  These recipes for Dutch Baby have very similar ratios to the kaiserschmarren recipe in the book (with the exception of how the eggs are treated) so maybe I have had it!  (more or less)

 

I know it as being quite fluffy, and tall. It is souffle like, but fully baked, so it's mostly cakey, perhaps a tad custardy. A dutch baby, as I know it, is mostly custardy.

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Here's a video similar to how I make mine, overall, really easy.

 

 

I prefer to slice mine rather than tore apart. I also skip the sugar as I find the dusting of powdered sugar and jam sweet enough.

Raisin haters can use chopped dried apricots or cherries. And don't forget to soak them in rum. It's also delicious with syrup maple and butter.

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Raspberry tart with raspberry buttercream and raspberry curd

 

raspberry_tart03.thumb.png.10b97df7c1ba697d05afc7f08a2b7cc3.pngraspberry_tart01.thumb.png.a7fe23f5d0e78bf463a62751181ad580.png

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19 hours ago, shain said:

Ha ha, sorry, was I was lazy :P So as I guess you already figured from the discussion, it's sort of a torn apart fluffy pancake thingy. I make them in biggish pieces (2"). 

I served it with quince and coriander preserve, as well as fromage blanc. Most of my family prefer to mix them up as a sauce, but I'm a dipper.


No need to apologize, I was just ribbing you. I'm not really too lazy to look it up. :D

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1 minute ago, Tri2Cook said:


No need to apologize, I was just ribbing you. I'm not really too lazy to look it up. :D

 

I figured so. I already know everyone here is too kind :)

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Flourless Chocolate & Apricot Pistachio Torte 

flourless.jpg

apricot pistachio.jpg

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On ‎10‎/‎7‎/‎2018 at 2:31 PM, FrogPrincesse said:

Dorie Greenspan’s World Peace Cookies


What'd you think of them? 

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57 minutes ago, Tri2Cook said:


What'd you think of them? 

I like them! The shortbread texture is nice, they are not too sweet, and the fleur de sel is a great touch! 

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2 hours ago, Tri2Cook said:

What'd you think of them? 

 I know you were not asking me. But I can’t help but tell you that they almost finished any desire on my part to ever bake anything ever again.  

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3 hours ago, Anna N said:

 I know you were not asking me. But I can’t help but tell you that they almost finished any desire on my part to ever bake anything ever again.  

Nothing wrong with a challenge every now and then, Anna.

 

To go along with the world peace cookies, I am very fond of this recipe.

 

https://food52.com/recipes/75975-salted-chocolate-shard-shortbread

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7 hours ago, Matthew.Taylor said:

Nothing wrong with a challenge every now and then, Anna.

 I think you’ll find in time I do not exactly shy away from a challenge.  

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11 hours ago, FrogPrincesse said:

I like them! The shortbread texture is nice, they are not too sweet, and the fleur de sel is a great touch! 


Ok, just wondered if I was the only one not as thrilled with them as I thought I would be. Looks like that's still the case.
 

9 hours ago, Anna N said:

 I know you were not asking me. But I can’t help but tell you that they almost finished any desire on my part to ever bake anything ever again.  


Or maybe it's not still the case. :D I just wasn't as excited by the finished cookie as I expected based on all the excitement about them I'd seen. Just thought they were ok, not great.
 

1 hour ago, Anna N said:

 I think you’ll find in time I do not exactly shy away from a challenge.  


That, you do not.

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1 hour ago, Tri2Cook said:

Just thought they were ok, not great.

Exactly.  Insufficient return on investment  at least for me. 

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Jessica made incredibly good blondies:

DSCN8665.thumb.JPG.c77b930d64e911ab5f6d2a7f461440e9.JPG

I’ve never had much luck with blondies, but she has the knack!  Full of white chocolate chips and walnuts and made with browned butter, these were delicious!

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Thought I'd have a go at making apple strudel.

 

1238939824_AppleStrudel.thumb.png.6a1473e5ac3b30b002d950a0e175b29d.png

 

It was a bit of a letdown, the filo disappointingly dry and heavy. That may be due to operator error - it could just be overcooked - but I'm gonna point the finger of blame at the shop-bought pastry being of not great quality (there were similar complaints on the supermarket website). Subsequent research suggests that filo will always be a little dry and papery compared to proper homemade strudel dough, but whether I can be bothered having a go at making my own is a different matter entirely. I might just call it quits.

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