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pjm333

Your Daily Sweets: What Are You Making and Baking? (2017 – )

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5a09bac30d66a_outofpan.thumb.jpg.76097ce446ffaab953c9da9cf7abc755.jpgI line the bottom of the pan with a strip of parchment paper, that's a must. When the cake has cooled, I cut around the sides to separate the cake from the pan. Then turn it upside down and it comes right out. I took a photo of the whole cake, but I thought I had too many photos up there so left it out. I'll try to find it. 

 


Edited by cakewalk Added photo (log)
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One thing I've always wondered about when using a Pullman pan - why  doesn't the bread stick to the lid?  I bought a Pullman pan several years ago and gave been afraid to use it as i have visions of never getting the bread out of it.

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4 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

One thing I've always wondered about when using a Pullman pan - why  doesn't the bread stick to the lid?  I bought a Pullman pan several years ago and gave been afraid to use it as i have visions of never getting the bread out of it.

I have never had bread stick to the pullman pans made by USA. They are amazingly slick and the downside to that is you can easily drop one!

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6 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

One thing I've always wondered about when using a Pullman pan - why  doesn't the bread stick to the lid?  I bought a Pullman pan several years ago and gave been afraid to use it as i have visions of never getting the bread out of it.

That often concerns me as well. For the cake above, I didn't use the lid. For breads, I know I've seen quite a few loaves sold commercially where the tops were burned. I'm sure the breads themselves were okay, but I have always been secretly horrified that they still sell something that looks like that. (I see it at the Union Square green market all the time.) Most Pullman pans are treated (I don't know with what, or how) and I usually don't grease the sides of my pan at all when I make bread. I do lightly grease the bottom. I guess the tops are treated as well, I've never greased the top and it has never stuck. I think the loaves with the burned tops happen because they do grease the tops, and it's the oil that burns. (A completely unprofessional observation, I don't really know why their tops burn but that's my guess.) Give it a try.

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My pan is a USA.  For my money, they are the best.  I have the smaller pan and I probably should try a loaf in it.  

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I always spray both the pan and lid with nonstick spray. Never had a problem with anything sticking, or anything burning. But I also typically pull the lid off about 10 minutes before I expect the bread to be done.

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18 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

My pan is a USA.  For my money, they are the best.  I have the smaller pan and I probably should try a loaf in it.  

I have the 9" Pain de Mie as well and I like the results I get from KAF's recipes for the smaller Pullman loaves.

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8 minutes ago, MelissaH said:

I always spray both the pan and lid with nonstick spray. Never had a problem with anything sticking, or anything burning. But I also typically pull the lid off about 10 minutes before I expect the bread to be done.

I also take the lid off at that point. It's not going to rise any more. I also put the whole loaf back into the oven after I've taken it out of the pan, just for a minute or two. I read this in a James Beard book years ago, it makes the crust just a bit crisper. I do it with all loaves, not just the Pullman. 

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Thanks, all.  This afternoon I made the smaller Pullman loaf from KAF.  I mixed the ingredients in the bread machine, stuck it in the loaf pan, let it rise and baked it in my Pullman pan.  Well, that was easy, and bonus, the bread slid right out if the USA pan.

20171113_163728.jpg

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27 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

Thanks, all.  This afternoon I made the smaller Pullman loaf from KAF.  I mixed the ingredients in the bread machine, stuck it in the loaf pan, let it rise and baked it in my Pullman pan.  Well, that was easy, and bonus, the bread slid right out if the USA pan.

20171113_163728.jpg

 I am curious if you used any oil or grease on the pan.  I never do and I’ve had no problems but I see other people do spray them. I find whatever I spray on them simply drips off. 


Edited by Anna N (log)

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22 minutes ago, Anna N said:

 I am curious if you used any oil or grease on the pan.  I never do and I’ve had no problems but I see other people do spray them. I find whatever I spray on them simply drips off. 

 

 

I sprayed the bottom but that was only because i am new to the pan and I was afraid it would stick.  When I went to take the lid off, i was glad I had because the lid wouldnt come off, so I said to myself, sure am glad the bottom won't stick like that.   But then I realized I was tugging at the wrong end.  Oops!:$    So then, the lid slid right off.  When it was finished baking, the loaf slid right out.  Next time I won't bother spraying.  I don't think it needs it.

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2 hours ago, ElsieD said:

Thanks, all.  This afternoon I made the smaller Pullman loaf from KAF.  I mixed the ingredients in the bread machine, stuck it in the loaf pan, let it rise and baked it in my Pullman pan.  Well, that was easy, and bonus, the bread slid right out if the USA pan.

   

 

Love it!!

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This is a Cranberry Pudding.  No photo of the Butter Sauce.  Not a very “pretty” thing, but, oh so delicious A7B9B947-E291-4480-9359-6E2AE4814F2C.thumb.jpeg.63720ebe5174f3c29bbbf6c83257edb9.jpeg

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12 minutes ago, RobertM said:

This is a Cranberry Pudding.  No photo of the Butter Sauce.  Not a very “pretty” thing, but, oh so delicious A7B9B947-E291-4480-9359-6E2AE4814F2C.thumb.jpeg.63720ebe5174f3c29bbbf6c83257edb9.jpeg

Steamed?

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I alway use strips of parchment on all sides and the top for angel food cakes or other sponge cakes. 

When I began back in the '60s, I used waxed paper with the lengthwise strips sticking out of the ends. 

They would sometimes char a bit but the "crust" of the cakes was barely tan.

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More fun playing around with piping tips, this time with the wide fluted "Chantilly" tip.

 

White chocolate tart

 

5a0acd09499ef_Whitechocolatetart.thumb.jpg.5b7b7af160daf0937f8a0c421e6902c5.jpg5a0acd261e587_Whitechocolatetartsmall.thumb.jpg.5d93d9037a6ff66e06bbea9f74bc1660.jpg

 

Sablé breton, hazelnut and ginger base

White chocolate and clementine chantilly

Hazelnuts, candied orange and ginger

 

Still a work in progress.  I can handle a big sugar hit from white chocolate, but it seems other people can't, so there's a big pinch of Maldon salt in both the base and the chantilly.  It probably needs something sharp to balance it out; diners still commented on the sweetness...

 

Pretty, though.

 

Also, I can't I've never done a white chocolate chantilly before.  It's so easy, the texture is wonderful, it holds its shape beautifully and it's so damn quick to make. 

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49 minutes ago, jmacnaughtan said:

Also, I can't I've never done a white chocolate chantilly before.  It's so easy, the texture is wonderful, it holds its shape beautifully and it's so damn quick to make. 

Just water and white chocolate?

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2 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

Just water and white chocolate?

 

No, not the Hervé This version.  This one was white chocolate and double cream, at 100:180, but I suppose at this ratio it's almost a whipped ganache (with dark chocolate I do 150:400).  I needed something that I could make quickly and still be able to pipe.

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3 hours ago, jmacnaughtan said:

I can handle a big sugar hit from white chocolate, but it seems other people can't, so there's a big pinch of Maldon salt in both the base and the chantilly.  It probably needs something sharp to balance it out; diners still commented on the sweetness...

 

 

It is a beautiful dessert. I can't imagine anyone commenting on your desserts except with the most lavish of praise. Having said that, yes, white chocolate can be really sweet. What chocolate are you using? If you haven't tried it, Valrhona's Opalys is a bit less sweet than all the others I have tasted (which at this point is a lot).

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1 minute ago, Jim D. said:

 

It is a beautiful dessert. I can't imagine anyone commenting on your desserts except with the most lavish of praise. Having said that, yes, white chocolate can be really sweet. What chocolate are you using? If you haven't tried it, Valrhona's Opalys is a bit less sweet than all the others I have tasted (which at this point is a lot).

 

Thanks :) I was running short on time, so I had to make do with standard Nestlé white from the local supermarket.  I do enjoy Opalys though, and it would certainly be a better fit for the dessert.  My problem with it is that it's too dangerous having big bags of white chocolate lying around...

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21 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

Steamed?

Yes....for about 2 hours

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Saturday was the Holiday Market at our church.  For the past three years I’ve overseen it and made the majority of the baked goods.  My contributions –

 

Table of treats (not including the cakes):

DSCN7620.JPG.d73c914048e0a45f0bbc78c59065af80.JPG

 

Cocoa-Banana Muffins:

DSCN7621.JPG.8aecf588b22717b57a350d6fc2f5d411.JPG

 

Double chocolate cherry cookies:

DSCN7622.JPG.d61311e9a167a03af2d82d34f6305029.JPG

 

Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Muffins:

DSCN7623.JPG.f46420c8d3636fdee2d57b8b6abf5246.JPG

 

Strawberry-Banana White Chocolate Chip cupcakes:

DSCN7624.JPG.aeb71b41c22a02186ed26f1777e65fa2.JPG

 

Ginger Chewies w/ Sugar Babies:

DSCN7625.JPG.9d6e1dcd993cacc3371b9bd0b14999ff.JPG

 

Lois’ Best Coffee Cakes:

DSCN7626.JPG.54eb7a6407336fd996d43519ce1a718f.JPG

I got this recipe from @Maggie the Cat years ago.  It is so simple and delicious and freezes beautifully (a necessity for bake sale items, in my opinion).

 

Chocolate-Chocolate Chip cupcakes:

DSCN7627.JPG.4e476667ea1375a4a37a0cc5d45d1357.JPG

 

GF Chocolate Cupcakes w/ Vanilla Icing:

DSCN7629.JPG.1f0b7e0b303b307a4cae2b618f6b7c73.JPG

 

Apple Cakes (two were pre-sold whole and the other was cut up and sold in pieces:

DSCN7631.JPG.db18120c79972a04ef9dda72ef037b00.JPG

 

Gingerbread Cake w/ Cranberry Filling and Orange Cream Cheese Icing – layers:

DSCN7635.JPG.f13fa332cfc3354d29aa66c73640eb49.JPG

 

Cranberry-Orange filling:

DSCN7634.thumb.JPG.6d46af32a1cb7bc81e19d7c3b76d8ff4.JPG

 

Finished cake:

DSCN7636.JPG.70e9f90a0db71fedecb4147e3b70e59b.JPG

Pre-sold two of these and sold the other at the bake sale.  I am one tired puppy.

 

 

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Wow, Kim, it all looks sooooo goooooood.  I wish I could have bought a bunch of it....   :)  

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Wow, Kim! That's amazing! When did you start on that haul?

 

Hope it brought your church a ton of money.

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