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Franci

Pasteurizing egg yolks again

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Hi guys, I know it's not the fist time I mention my need to pasteurize eggs.

I need a little table if anybody has one for just pasteurizing the yolk.

Example. 60C for how long? 70C? 80 already too much I guess.

I am mixing the yolks with sugar and heating them together if that makes a difference.

 

Thanks!

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Minimum temp of 63.5C for a minimum of 3.5 minutes. 


"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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And here's the table:

Screenshot_20170531-204713.jpg

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"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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that is an excellent table

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the USDA  numbers are a bit high.  whole egg 60 C ?

 

however  they want to be on the safe side so Im guessing that's the reason for the numbers

 

130.1 F   (  a trad less than 55 C ) will pasteurize anything if you leave it ' in the bath ' long enough, then treat it appropriately 

 

after its ' done '

 

I wonder what a 140 egg is like , has it begun to ' cook ? '  i.e. 60 C ?

 

they do say albumin @ 55.6 C is pasteurized.

 

its also important that the pasteurized egg does not get re-contaminated after its pasteurized :

 

i.e. you can't put it back in the egg carton unless its also pasteurized  

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Posted (edited)

6 hours ago, rotuts said:

the USDA  numbers are a bit high.  whole egg 60 C ?

 

however  they want to be on the safe side so Im guessing that's the reason for the numbers

 

130.1 F   (  a trad less than 55 C ) will pasteurize anything if you leave it ' in the bath ' long enough, then treat it appropriately 

 

after its ' done '

 

I wonder what a 140 egg is like , has it begun to ' cook ? '  i.e. 60 C ?

 

they do say albumin @ 55.6 C is pasteurized.

 

its also important that the pasteurized egg does not get re-contaminated after its pasteurized :

 

i.e. you can't put it back in the egg carton unless its also pasteurized  

 

The USDA guidelines are indeed high in that they are designed to achieve a level of reduction in pathogenic organisms that is sufficient to prevent foodborne illness even in vulnerable people. The target is something like a 5-log reduction in the case of egg products, meaning that the conditions in their guidelines are designed to reduce microorganisms in the product by a factor of 100,000. And it is true that above a certain minimum temperature you can achieve an equivalent log reduction by increasing the amount of time-at-temp, but it's worth pointing out that as the temp decreases, the time-at-temp required increases logarithmically. For instance, USDA recommends cooking chicken to 165F, which hits the reduction target in a matter of seconds. You can achieve the same reduction at 136F, but that would take over an hour. 

 

Finally, a whole egg at 140F will just begin to see some protein coagulation. Ovotransferrin, a protein component that makes up 12% of the white, will start to coagulate at 140F. Ovalbumin, which comprises 54% of the white, starts to coagulate at 180F. Yolk proteins don't start to coagulate until right around 149F (65C), so pasteurizing at 63.3C should not result in any appreciable thickening. 


Edited by Patrick S Kant spel guud (log)
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"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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I'm going from memory, but I thought Douglas Baldwin recommended 135F for 75 minutes in his Sous Vide book. Three and a half minutes at 140F would certainly be a time-saver if I need to quickly make some mayo.

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