Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

kevnick80

How do they do that? (the bonbon thread)

Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, Kerry Beal said:

Link sent to me yesterday by chocolatier friend in Manchester - here

You could make some very interesting moulded bon bons with that technique! No tape needed and some detailed designs. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, interesting way to do things.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not a bon bon but I am curious how these eclair toppers are made....is it an edible ink printer?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, I do not expect an answer and I understand completely why I won't get one... I know full-well that this is from an online course that is not free that several here are currently taking part in. But with all the impudence that I can muster...

galaxy321.jpg

In all honesty, I wouldn't need the answer even if I could have it. I'm quite sure that's above my skill level. But I felt like somebody had to be the smartass that asked. :P :D

  • Like 2
  • Haha 1

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Tri2Cook said:

No, I do not expect an answer and I understand completely why I won't get one... I know full-well that this is from an online course that is not free that several here are currently taking part in. But with all the impudence that I can muster...

galaxy321.jpg

In all honesty, I wouldn't need the answer even if I could have it. I'm quite sure that's above my skill level. But I felt like somebody had to be the smartass that asked. :P :D

I could tell you - but then I'd have to kill you!

  • Like 2
  • Haha 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, Tri2Cook said:

No, I do not expect an answer and I understand completely why I won't get one... I know full-well that this is from an online course that is not free that several here are currently taking part in. But with all the impudence that I can muster...

galaxy321.jpg

In all honesty, I wouldn't need the answer even if I could have it. I'm quite sure that's above my skill level. But I felt like somebody had to be the smartass that asked. :P :D

Excellent close-up! These are extraordinarily beautiful, Kerry! (Now I'm going to have to see if I can figure out how to get close to that result through experimentation. :D

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Bentley said:

Not a bon bon but I am curious how these eclair toppers are made....is it an edible ink printer?

 

Yes - it's a transfer made on an edible ink printer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Custom made transfer sheets on white chocolate...then a slight curve to conform to the eclair shape...that technique has been around for quite a few years for eclairs...I think Christophe Adams made it famous with his Mona Lisa prints on his eclairs..

8 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

Yes - it's a transfer made on an edible ink printer.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/19/2018 at 10:33 AM, pastrygirl said:

This is not one that I'm eager to replicate, but still one that I can't figure out what tool(s) they used ...

Some of the scratches are centered in the white but then there are white lines without scratches.  Parallel lines

make me think dipping fork, but the scale is wrong and who would do that to their molds? 

 

5ad8d1a1e9489_ScreenShot2018-04-19at10_25_49AM.png.dd7ee2f517ec91d2db1309fd89f810a6.png

 

Ok, I am just guessing here, but, if you use a calligraphy pen or a real quill, you sometimes get that empty line in the middle. (I've been practicing since the 1970s.) I think someone here used a split calligraphy nib with fairly liquid white cocoa butter. This would also explain the curvy-ness of the lines themselves and how, if you look at one line at a time, one end has glob of cocoa butter on the tip and the other end trails off with less. It just looks like messing around with a calligraphy pen and ink that was too thick. In particular, it looks like they were using a fairly fine cut tip like you'd use for uncials, not a pointed tip and not one of the thick writing tips that has a circle on the end.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Avachocolate said:

Custom made transfer sheets on white chocolate...then a slight curve to conform to the eclair shape...that technique has been around for quite a few years for eclairs...I think Christophe Adams made it famous with his Mona Lisa prints on his eclairs..

 

I think it might be on fondant rather than white chocolate in this particular picture. I know @Alleguede has done this for some special occasion eclairs - but it gets expensive quickly!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Lisa Shock said:

 

Ok, I am just guessing here, but, if you use a calligraphy pen or a real quill, you sometimes get that empty line in the middle. (I've been practicing since the 1970s.) I think someone here used a split calligraphy nib with fairly liquid white cocoa butter. This would also explain the curvy-ness of the lines themselves and how, if you look at one line at a time, one end has glob of cocoa butter on the tip and the other end trails off with less. It just looks like messing around with a calligraphy pen and ink that was too thick. In particular, it looks like they were using a fairly fine cut tip like you'd use for uncials, not a pointed tip and not one of the thick writing tips that has a circle on the end.

Wouldn't that scratch your molds?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Kerry Beal said:

I think it might be on fondant rather than white chocolate in this particular picture. I know @Alleguede has done this for some special occasion eclairs - but it gets expensive quickly!

@Kerry Beal Have never seen it done with fondant...I guess these days everything is possible with the right technology (and wallet...)..lol

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, Avachocolate said:

@Kerry Beal Have never seen it done with fondant...I guess these days everything is possible with the right technology (and wallet...)..lol

Actually just clarified with him - it prints onto rice paper (same stuff that I had for my transfer molds that never really worked out for me with the printer), then transferred onto fondant or white marzipan. He says eclair du genie prints directly onto white marzipan then covers with neutral glaze to get that shine. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

Wouldn't that scratch your molds?

The metal type might unless you used a light hand. I don't think a genuine quill pen would scratch. Also, once you know how to cut a quill, you can cut other things, like paper drinking straws, to write with.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

Actually just clarified with him - it prints onto rice paper (same stuff that I had for my transfer molds that never really worked out for me with the printer), then transferred onto fondant or white marzipan. He says eclair du genie prints directly onto white marzipan then covers with neutral glaze to get that shine. 

Cool....learned something new today :-)

Thanks for investigating that....

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/31/2018 at 9:05 AM, Kerry Beal said:

Actually just clarified with him - it prints onto rice paper (same stuff that I had for my transfer molds that never really worked out for me with the printer), then transferred onto fondant or white marzipan. He says eclair du genie prints directly onto white marzipan then covers with neutral glaze to get that shine. 

Do you know what kind of machine would be used for this?   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi there,  I'm Dean.

i'm a newbie when it comes to chocolate making.


what i want to know is not particularly about design

but how to get bonbons as shiny as those in the picture..
I've seen a lot of bonbons from other chocolatiers,

but i'm always amazed how Andrey's are THAT shiny.


I know that polishing molds with cotton balls would help.. but that's about it.

Do i have to spray the surface with cocoa butter first or something?

Thanks guys. :)

PS. Here is a clip i stumbled across for the marbled effect similar to Monde Du Chocolat's bonbons.

Hope it helps! https://www.instagram.com/p/BQ6ONCgl5gW

So shiny it hurts my eyes.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
58 minutes ago, DeanTheBaker said:

I know that polishing molds with cotton balls would help.. but that's about it.

Do i have to spray the surface with cocoa butter first or something?

 

yes, polish 'til your fingers bleed, then spray with ... looks like 3 or 4 colors of cocoa butter

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, DeanTheBaker said:

I know that polishing molds with cotton balls would help.. but that's about it.

Do i have to spray the surface with cocoa butter first or something?

There's a few of us taking a class with him right now. Get temps perfect including your room; he doesn't polish although occasionally he cleans with alcohol - he does NOT polish with cocoa butter. And he does a lot with opaque colors.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a question about polishing molds with cotton balls/pads and alcohol. I seem to get a lot of left over fluff in my mold cavities from my cotton. Are there levels of quality of cotton pads (I’m using the cheap store brand)? Would a lint free cloth work better, do you think? Am I the only one who experiences this?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Pastrypastmidnight said:

I have a question about polishing molds with cotton balls/pads and alcohol. I seem to get a lot of left over fluff in my mold cavities from my cotton. Are there levels of quality of cotton pads (I’m using the cheap store brand)? Would a lint free cloth work better, do you think? Am I the only one who experiences this?


Happens to me too but usually only when I try to be cheap and get more out of one pad than I probably should. If I switch them out as soon as they start looking a little ragged, it usually doesn't happen.

Edit: Ok, just realized you said "cotton balls/pads and alcohol"... I've never actually done that. I just use the dry pads.


Edited by Tri2Cook (log)
  • Like 2

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like OR tapes (aka lap sponges) for polishing - lint free, soft, non scratching. 

 

Lap sponges

 

I've also used suede like microfiber purchased from a fabric store. 

 

Microfiber polishing cloth

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By CharTruff
      Hello! 
       
      I am doing some spring cleaning and am selling some of my used polycarbonate molds. I've attached pictures and dimensions below.  The mold prices do not include shipping fee. I will ship these via USPS priority mail. 
       
      For estimation purposes only, 4 - 5 molds can fit in a medium box and it costs $15.05 to ship. Please let me know if you have any questions.  
       
      Thank you. 
      Charlotte W. 





    • By eglies
      Hello everyone!
       
      I was wondering if anyone could help me out with these design attached?
       
      I manage to make it on the table somehow and then when trying it into the mould it just doesnt work  
       
      Any tips on this ?
       
      Thank you!!

    • By ptw1953
      I am wishing to purchase some black cocao butter, but it is scarcer than hobby-horse sh*te here in the UK. I do have some cocao butter, and some black fat-soluble powder. Tips and tricks for the making of black cocao butter at home would be most welcome...
       
      ptw1953
    • By La Vie Chocolat
      Beautiful day chocolate friends.
       
      I'm brand new here on the forum. Almost two years ago, I started making pralines in the Czech Republic. There are not many manufacturers and not at all those who work by hand. I have a big problem with cleaning the molds. I like to work cleanly, so I absolutely clean and polish alcohol before each batch of molds. I use my little helper for this - an accumulation screwdriver with an extension, which I made from a wine cork - it works perfectly. I apply clean make-up tampons and possibly alcohol to it.

      But now I have a lot of molds and manual cleaning is crazy. I bought an older dishwasher in a restaurant and I can't find a product (soap, detergent) that would well remove the remnants of chocolate from the sides of the molds and at the same time, of course, would not destroy the molds? Does anyone have any type or advice for any other cleaning machine, please?
       
      I bought a special product "Brillform", which is intended for rinsing already washed molds - it should ensure shine without polishing each tube, but first I have to get the chocolate away.
       
       Here is a link to my website and instagram, you can look at my work and I will be very happy and grateful for any advice and warnings on what I could improve, because there is no professional in the Czech Republic focused on pralines, so there is no one to learn from I teach myself by rehearsing and from great books, videos and watching the world's chocolatiers.
       
      Thank you again
    • By Vojta
      I successfully demold finished chocolate pralines. ??? I pour chocolate into cavities to form shells for my next pralines.  
      Question is simple: what is step 2.? Polish with cottom/ and alcohol/ wash in hot water/ use dishsoap/ do nothing/ somethig else? Does it depend if it was chocolate bar or praline/ if I used coloured CB or not? What if demolding was not that easy or successfull?
       
      I always washed in hot water with soft sponge and dish liquid. Dried, polished with cottom and used again. But I read I should clean my molds 1 or 2 times per year only! I thought residual fat will make demolding more difficult and inhibit shine.
       
      Where is the truth please? Whats correct?
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...