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How do they do that? (the bonbon thread)


kevnick80
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2 hours ago, Altay.Oro said:

 

In this photo and in this instagram post https://www.instagram.com/p/CHxrzrRnu0v/ ... bonbons all have thin coverings and so very sharp corners ... maybe the current trend in the industry.

 

I would like to ask ... whether or not enrobers have an adjustable setting for layering this type thin chocolate layers on centers ... or the chocolate used in coating thinned with cocoa butter?

So if you put a thin layer of chocolate on top of the slab and cut with the guitar while still wet - it will help a lot with those sharp corners. The coating thickness is determined by the amount of air you blow. And if those earlier pictures are Melissa - then it is a Selmi!

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2 hours ago, pastrygirl said:

I don't think she thins it, it may be the particular couverture and settings on the machine.

 

She's a Callebaut ambassador but I'm not familiar with which of their chocolates are most fluid. 

 

2 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

So if you put a thin layer of chocolate on top of the slab and cut with the guitar while still wet - it will help a lot with those sharp corners. The coating thickness is determined by the amount of air you blow. And if those earlier pictures are Melissa - then it is a Selmi!


 

Hi ... I've never seen an enrober. As just a guess ... I think there may be a setting on the enrober for controlling the chocolate flowing rate and the coating thickness can be adjustable in this way.

Do you mean this by the amount of air blowed?

 

 

Edited by Altay.Oro (log)
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14 minutes ago, Altay.Oro said:

 


 

Hi ... I've never seen an enrober. As just a guess ... I think there may be a setting on the enrober for controlling the chocolate flowing rate and the coating thickness can be adjustable in this way.

Do you mean this by the amount of air blowed?

 

 

The flow of chocolate is basically fixed - some differences for viscosity of chocolate of course. So every item gets covered with the same thickness of chocolate then a combination of tapping and air blowing determines how much chocolate is left on the item.

 

Selmi enrober

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22 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

The flow of chocolate is basically fixed - some differences for viscosity of chocolate of course. So every item gets covered with the same thickness of chocolate then a combination of tapping and air blowing determines how much chocolate is left on the item.

 

Selmi enrober

 

Thank you ... seems really a must-have item for bonbon producers.

Edited by Altay.Oro (log)
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  • 4 weeks later...
On 3/18/2021 at 10:01 AM, pastrygirl said:

It's the little bit of color that creeps under the edge of the tape

 

Melisa Coppel actually uses that as a technique to make one of her designs iirc

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On 3/18/2021 at 2:01 AM, pastrygirl said:

It's the little bit of color that creeps under the edge of the tape

how to apply tape to the mould with such accuracy? it's 1cm tape?

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At my last Coppel workshop I asked her specifically to teach me this technique. Obviously I only just started to figure out the pressure to apply and the angles, but I understood how she got to where she did...and that she could never do this is full production. If you'd like to see the step by step I'll share access to my google photos file. Just DM me your email.

IMG_20180924_084024.thumb.jpg.94ea8375811ab4467bde20dcebdb5ea1.jpg

IMG_20180924_101435.thumb.jpg.93ba6fecc14ccd48875b00d72c0aec77.jpg

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12 minutes ago, AAQuesada said:

Not sure if this is the best place to put this or not but here it goes! It's a 3 min video of  Jacques Genin decorating a large chocolate egg. By the French magazine Le Fooding's Instagram page (a great follow btw.) https://www.instagram.com/tv/CNPyN91iDNE/?igshid=1x7elguck8m3p

 

 

Beautiful, but I'm not sure I would call that a large chocolate egg.

 

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6 minutes ago, AAQuesada said:

Lol! I'm not sure i would either!! My poor imagination failed to come up a better description though...but I'm open to suggestions 

 

Medium large chocolate egg.

 

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  • 2 months later...
1 hour ago, SweetandSnappyJen said:

I’ve got one! Any idea how this technique is done? I think it’s so pretty! 

B3357974-13D9-4A66-A8AC-0805C27247E9.png

 

I've been trying to get something close to that for a long time, ever since I saw her Easter eggs.  One year I printed out the images of some of the eggs and had them in front of me to see if I couldn't get that blended effect, but did not succeed.  I think there is either white chocolate or white cocoa butter used to get the pastel painting effect, but I don't have her skill.  Unfortunately she is not one of those chocolatiers who shares her secrets!  Without making a deliberate effort to emulate the blended pastel look, I recently got something roughly similar when I airbrushed a gradient of light pink and light green cocoa butter, then used white chocolate for the shell (the filling was rhubarb and strawberry, thus the color choices), but it was nowhere close to the stunning effects she obtains.

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Here's what I did:

 

choc1.thumb.jpg.b2b02b95467fc65c8b6711808c7d5c8c.jpg

 

On second looks, it doesn't resemble the work of Monde du Chocolot all that much.  And, in the interest of honesty, the flavor combination was disappointing so much so that I am officially giving up on rhubarb as a bonbon ingredient.  Even though the rhubarb pâte de fruit was delicious on its own, the strawberry ganache and Zéphyr caramel shell overwhelmed it.  Rhubarb is for pies and similar pastries, not (IMHO) chocolates.

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That's beautiful!  It definitely has the same feel, color-wise. I've never tried rhubarb in a bonbon, but I could see how it would be overpowered. I'd think it would have to be a very subtle strawberry with a white shell. But love a good strawberry rhubarb pastry!

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On 2/17/2020 at 12:51 AM, MrG_84 said:

Hello,

So I am trying to dye my homemade bonbons with my own homemade colored cocoa butter.

I have noticed that some brands of chocolate paint are using natural ingridients, like Flower power IBC using spirulina, beetroot and curcumin:

https://www.ibcbelgium.com/en/power-flowers-spirulina.html

https://www.ibcbelgium.com/en/power-flowers-beetroot.html

https://www.ibcbelgium.com/en/power-flowers-non-azo-yellow.html

 

1. How can I make my own homemade colors? Those that I made weren't concentraded enough and the result was a dull color, nothing of the brilliance that store bought paint would give. I don't think it is possible for me to dissolve enough curcumin in cocoa butter to get that very shiny yellow color. See picture. Are they maybe using an emulsifier? Which one?

 

2. I also think that these store bought colors are liquid in room temperature, right? But cocoa butter is not liquid in room temperature, so how do they do that? Do they add something? What?

 

Thanks!

20200216_083005.png

 

Try using Titanium Dioxide as that will make your colors more opaque. 

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Try using a gloved finger to paint in some pastel colors (mixing in some white cocoa butter to your standard colours will do) and swirl your finger around. This isn’t the same colour scheme but you do get more of a swirled effect to it. It also looks to me like she may have used an airbrush to thin out some areas after application before backing it with white

07342EEB-D39A-4C19-A287-E792F7A051AF.jpeg

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Actually I put a dab of each in and swirled together to get a more marbled effect. If you’re after a similar effect to that heart I think a few dabs/swirls and then bursts with an airbrush (no cocoa butter, just air) should give similar

Edited by Jonathan (log)
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These are the closest approximations I've achieved, to what Monde du Chocolat creates. It really seems to require close attention to color combinations and intensity. I've played with different techniques, but the most successful seems to be a loosely gloved finger, swirling dropped in colors. You have to watch for colors that, if close to each other, will turn muddy. And subtler color combos seem to do better than sharp contrasts or intense ones.

IMG_20210302_145952524_HDR.jpg

IMG_20200718_111548571_HDR.jpg

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