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How do they do that? (the bonbon thread)


kevnick80
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That didn't work for me. Devil is in the details I suppose. I'm not sure the swirl is relevant to the effect but I tried a number of different swirls both just on top and over the whole mold. His white spray seems like it was only along the sides so I did some where I only sprayed the edges  and others only spraying straight down from the top with a focused nozzle. Maybe viscosity or saturation plays a role.

IMG_20200925_130926.thumb.jpg.35ed09a1ea6d95b10b6278cd28983842.jpg

IMG_20200925_130930.thumb.jpg.acefc52cc7556a9c02bfe299561524e5.jpg

Edited by gfron1 (log)
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4 minutes ago, pastrygirl said:

I'd guess silver, gold, and bronze metallic cocoa butters, could be backed with black or just dark chocolate in the mold.

but how do they get those black smudges? if it were just backed with black, then theoretically it should look more uniform, no?

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Just now, lironp said:

but how do they get those black smudges? if it were just backed with black, then theoretically it should look more uniform, no?

 

You'd get that if the metallic CB was roughly brushed or sponged in, leaving some bits uncovered (by metallic) to be filled in by the next layer (of choc or CB)

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Just now, pastrygirl said:

 

You'd get that if the metallic CB was roughly brushed or sponged in, leaving some bits uncovered (by metallic) to be filled in by the next layer (of choc or CB)

ahh.. that makes sense. and wow, so time consuming!

Also metallic- is the jewel line by chefrubber considered metallic? I use it and definitely do not get those colors...

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2 hours ago, lironp said:

Also metallic- is the jewel line by chefrubber considered metallic? I use it and definitely do not get those colors...


Yes but look at the colors named after metals, gold, silver, bronze, brass. I think the combo of shimmer in the cb, and shine from tempering makes it read more metallic in those shades than say green or yellow. 
 

for example here are some bonbons with silver dabbed in with a brush, though I’m not sure if it was Chef Rubber or Roxy & Rich color 

71B33F7A-C183-4CCC-810C-A8EEAC278667.jpeg.44fd700a23cf9b865ef1eea998c4f708.jpeg

 

more silver, black splattered in first then airbrushed silver 

F456E65F-C797-47A6-961F-BF3A57830F58.jpeg.c265c6e821b3edf7ea7f29ef4a70688a.jpeg

Edited by pastrygirl (log)
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To me those look like they have been brushed after unmolding.

 

Nope - I'm wrong - on instagram you can see her pull them out of the mold with the luster already on there. 

Edited by Kerry Beal (log)
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On 8/12/2020 at 12:07 AM, lironp said:

image.thumb.png.d15f9f7a6c48da234f9c3b3794861ce7.png

Saw this in a pavoni mold image- is this just gold leaf they stick in the mold one by one? or is there a smarter way to do this?

 

Hi, I'm new here, I've been lurking for such a long time here and this community seems so nice, I thought it was time i joined... so here it is my first post!

 

I tried something like that a while ago, I got a nice result by applying a thin coat of clear cocoa butter than sprinkling some gold flakes and pressing them gently to flatten them and make them stick to the cocoa butter. I used a cotton ball at the time but now that i use an airbrush, maybe it could work if you spray very lightly from far away. The idea is only to have something to make the gold flakes stick otherwise it will blend into your chocolate.

 

120350843_337386300683393_5138746146069990921_n.jpg

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1 hour ago, Muscadelle said:

I tried something like that a while ago, I got a nice result by applying a thin coat of clear cocoa butter than sprinkling some gold flakes and pressing them gently to flatten them and make them stick to the cocoa butter. I used a cotton ball at the time but now that i use an airbrush, maybe it could work if you spray very lightly from far away. The idea is only to have something to make the gold flakes stick otherwise it will blend into your chocolate.

 Welcome to eGullet.

 

That is an interesting idea.  So you had no trouble with anything sticking to the mold when you unmolded the bonbon?  I would be concerned that some gold flakes would stay in the mold and leave little holes behind.  But it looks good.  I've never had much luck with using luster dust and similar decorations--they are either invisible or melt into the chocolate.

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2 hours ago, Muscadelle said:

I tried something like that a while ago, I got a nice result by applying a thin coat of clear cocoa butter than sprinkling some gold flakes and pressing them gently to flatten them and make them stick to the cocoa butter. I used a cotton ball at the time but now that i use an airbrush, maybe it could work if you spray very lightly from far away. The idea is only to have something to make the gold flakes stick otherwise it will blend into your chocolate.

 

Try charging the mold with static electricity, then the gold leaf should stick immediately.

 

 

 

Teo

 

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Teo

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1 hour ago, Jim D. said:

 Welcome to eGullet.

 

That is an interesting idea.  So you had no trouble with anything sticking to the mold when you unmolded the bonbon?  I would be concerned that some gold flakes would stay in the mold and leave little holes behind.  But it looks good.  I've never had much luck with using luster dust and similar decorations--they are either invisible or melt into the chocolate.

Ive done quite a bit with luster dust till i got my airbrush- polish the cavities, brush the dust with a makeup brush and then pour chocolate- the ones in the photo are just luster dust, no CB.

 

What is your process?

IMG_20200911_153208_820.jpg

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19 minutes ago, lironp said:

Ive done quite a bit with luster dust till i got my airbrush- polish the cavities, brush the dust with a makeup brush and then pour chocolate- the ones in the photo are just luster dust, no CB.

 

What is your process?

If the purple color comes completely from luster dust, that is very impressive.  What kind of chocolate is behind it?  These are beautiful.  Where do you get the luster dust?

 

My process (haven't done it in ages) is the same, but the color seemed to be absorbed, certainly did not show up like yours.

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19 hours ago, lironp said:

I live these! Any ideas how they get the black/shimmery effect?

 

9 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

To me those look like they have been brushed after unmolding.

 

I'm maintaining my brush in first stance ;)

Edited by pastrygirl (log)
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2 hours ago, Jim D. said:

 Welcome to eGullet.

 

That is an interesting idea.  So you had no trouble with anything sticking to the mold when you unmolded the bonbon?  I would be concerned that some gold flakes would stay in the mold and leave little holes behind.  But it looks good.  I've never had much luck with using luster dust and similar decorations--they are either invisible or melt into the chocolate.

No problem, all the flakes stuck to the chocolates! :)

 

I use hybrid sparkling powder from Roxy & Rich, their products are made in Montreal and are sold by Chocolat Chocolat. (I dont know if it's authorized to recommend specific brands here)

 

Anyway, they have a line called Hybrid sparkle dust which reflects the light a lot more than the Hybrid Lustre dust. I even mix some into the cocoa butter even though it's not made for that purpose and it works great.

 

Otherwise I use a powder spray pump and spray after having applied cocoa butter. I like it because it always gives a nice transparency/ombre look.

here's an exemple of spraying red and green sparkling powder after making black cb swirls.

 

The other one is gold sparkling powder mixed with cb and used with andrey dubovik technique with the airbrush. white chocolate shell.

 

IMG_2251.jpg

IMG_2266.jpg

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4 hours ago, Jim D. said:

If the purple color comes completely from luster dust, that is very impressive.  What kind of chocolate is behind it?  These are beautiful.  Where do you get the luster dust?

 

My process (haven't done it in ages) is the same, but the color seemed to be absorbed, certainly did not show up like yours.

Completely luster dust (with painters tape for the line) and just dark chocolate backing it. I got the powders from bakedeco, and have never had an issue with them mixing with the chocolate

3 hours ago, pastrygirl said:

 

 

I'm maintaining my brush in first stance ;)

So just luster dust or cocoa butter? 

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On 9/27/2020 at 4:54 PM, Muscadelle said:

Anyway, they have a line called Hybrid sparkle dust which reflects the light a lot more than the Hybrid Lustre dust. I even mix some into the cocoa butter even though it's not made for that purpose and it works great.


Does mixing the sparkle dust into cocoa butter cause any problems with spraying it with an airbrush? I have a couple of the colors that I assumed I was going to have to brush in after mixing but it would be a whole lot nicer if I could spray it instead. :D

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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1 hour ago, Tri2Cook said:


Does mixing the sparkle dust into cocoa butter cause any problems with spraying it with an airbrush? I have a couple of the colors that I assumed I was going to have to brush in after mixing but it would be a whole lot nicer if I could spray it instead. :D

I've mixed both sparkle and lustre interference powder into coloured cocoa butter and been able to spray without difficulty. Now the decor sized sparkle I wouldn't even try.

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  • 5 weeks later...

Quick question here guys about capping. How do you guys manage to get perfectly clean bottoms for your bonbon each times? We tend to often get this problem, some bleeding of the ganache through the cap. This is a simple coffee ganache - chocolate infused cream and butter. Seems to happen to us often. Is it simply due to overfill? Should the ganache be put in the mold at a certain temp, should we chill the ganache before capping? Would appreciate any of you guys tricks.

Cheers

20201029_203507.jpg

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To add to Kerry’s advice... wait to cap your bonbons, give the ganache time to firm up or at the very least develop a skin before you cap. You can cap liquidy ganache but it is far easier to wait until it firms up. Also, if you cap a liquidy ganache and it firms up after you close the mold you may have issues with cracks in your bonbon shell. 

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And to add to Kerrys and Curls advice, one thing that helped me is piping chocolate on each cavity before tapping and scraping. In many videos people seem to add chocolate to one side of the mold, then scrape to carry that chocolate over to the rest of the cavities. Now I pipe just enough chocolate to cap, tap, and try for one clean scrape, maybe 2.

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Yes to those three, plus...I've found that my eyes have gotten so bad that I can't see any peaks, so while the filling is freshly piped, I very gently run my scraper over the cavities which shows me any peaks that need to be knocked down. I've been working really hard on my formulas to achieve what Kerry mentioned and that is keeping the ganache fluid enough that it settles on its own.

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I tend to get a lot more peaks on my dark chocolate ganaches, so I usually have to go back after the filling is set and use a gloved finger to gently press it down or even use a small angled spatula to scrape off the tip of the peak.

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