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How do they do that? (the bonbon thread)


kevnick80
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46 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

Likely the white chocolate put in behind was not warm enough.

Yes, whenever this happens to me its for this reason, in combination with my room being a touch too cold. When I re-warm the chocolate to the high end of the range everything comes out fine.

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thanks! yes my room is very cold as well. I should have thought about this as it happens when I use the same chocolate for shelling multiple molds

 

do you have a suggestion for batch shelling? would it help if I temper the chocolate and let is stay on the melting machine? would I lose the temper without stirring it?

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2 hours ago, hvea said:

do you have a suggestion for batch shelling? would it help if I temper the chocolate and let is stay on the melting machine? would I lose the temper without stirring it?

 

Many people here say great things about the Paragon induction unit with its mat. Considering it's cheap and you can use it for a boatload of other stuff, I would say it's the best choice for you.

 

 

 

Teo

 

Teo

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9 minutes ago, Desiderio said:

I was checking Iginio Massari website the other day, and peaked at his chocolate line.

That is a signature, but it looks like it was applied into the molds, like a transfer sheet?

Iginio-Massari-Pralines-San-Valentino-1.png

 

Transfer sheet, or possibly a well designed stencil. I've come up with a way to turn stainless steel shot glasses into nice stencils to airbrush through - but you have to have access to a micromachining person.

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Pierre Hermé is doing some precision decorating like that on some of his latest macarons.

A couple years ago I saw a prototype of a robot (a cross between a machining center and a 3D printer), seems like the guys at Relais Dessert put their hands on it.

 

 

 

Teo

 

Teo

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On 2/16/2020 at 7:30 AM, teonzo said:

 

De-mold the bonbons.

Freeze them.

Spray yellow cocoa butter all over their surface, if they are frozen the you get the velvet effect (this technique is a classic for entremets).

Put a sort of collar over each bonbon.

Spray red cocoa butter on top.

Take away the collar.

Pipe the heart (basic technique with a cornet).

 

 

 

Teo

 

 Definitely this. Frozen then sprayed... i was thinking he may have used an upside down pastry tip for the necklace shape...like maybe a leaf tip...then sprayed over again.

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On 2/16/2020 at 12:19 PM, Sweet Impact Mama said:


Having pursued the illusive all-natural beauty goal for nearly 3 years now, here's what I've come up with.

1) I would never try making dyes myself, because even the companies that have all-natural powders that work in fat-based applications, have had very little success creating fine enough powders with strong pigments. For the plant-based powder routed, only Sensient has come close. They do sell vibrant, well-dissolving colors, but you have to purchase huge quantities, that expire within 12 months, on average.

2) Pur Colour makes amazing metallics that are mineral based and do a really good job - they are a staple in my work.

3) Chef Rubber has cracked the code with their new all-natural, organic colored cocoa butter line. I'll post some pics of the valentines day products that I did with their stuff. IT is truly incredible and since I tend to play with color mixing a lot, they have the best options for varieties to work with.

 

IMG_20200106_095758474.jpg

IMG_20200110_084742693.jpg

IMG_20200115_115928011.jpg

Ooh. All so pretty 💓

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On 2/17/2020 at 10:59 AM, gfron1 said:

Yes, whenever this happens to me its for this reason, in combination with my room being a touch too cold. When I re-warm the chocolate to the high end of the range everything comes out fine.

100% of the time for me too. If my chocolate is over crystallised/too cool. ....hello heartbreak.

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On 2/19/2020 at 3:09 PM, Desiderio said:

I was checking Iginio Massari website the other day, and peaked at his chocolate line.

That is a signature, but it looks like it was applied into the molds, like a transfer sheet?

Iginio-Massari-Pralines-San-Valentino-1.png

 

 

This reminds me a little of something I saw from Noela Chocolate in the Tampa, FL area:
 

What theuy call "state of the art" methods looks to me to be something like custom stencils - maybe 3D printed?

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  • 4 weeks later...

I have a project that I have to do for Easter at work, and I am dreading it. I am supposed to write on chocolate eggs, and I have the worst hand writing even and I hate hand decorating. Also my hands have gotten super stiff with the years and I don't do well with fine and intricate designs.

Anyway, I have been trying to brainstorming and figuring out a new modern way to write on these darn eggs without using a piping bag and my not so great hand writing skills.

A friend of mine has one of those Criquet (sp) and I was thinking maybe we can figure out a way to have her cut me some stencils with the names and somehow spray them on the eggs, not in the mold but after I have un molded them. Or maybe would it be easier to do it into the mold before I pour chocolate?

Anyone tried something like this? I have seen stencil work around this page, wondering if I can do with something like a name or a word in a curved mold.

 

Thank you :-)

Vanessa

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if you have a small airbrush that has very little overspray, or you mask the rest of the mold that isn't covered by stencil with some plastic wrap or something, I don't see why spraying it before hand would be a problem, so long as you're using an opaque cocoa butter that will show up once you've put chocolate in the mold.

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Thank you! I'll give it a shot.

If all fail (due my lack of skills and not anything else), I am thinking my safest bet is to use royal icing to write on the eggs, because I suspect, I am going to have some running left and right with chocolate. Royal icing should be firm enough to stay put.

Vanessa

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1 hour ago, pastrygirl said:

I've been ogling the near-seamless eggs that so many other chocolatiers produce.  Mine have room for improvement, any tips?  How much melt to you really need to get hollow halves stuck together? 

It doesn’t take much melt to glue the egg halves together.  I try to attach them as soon as the halves start to melt.

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 4/17/2020 at 12:09 AM, @baking.in said:

 

Screenshot_2020-04-17-00-06-10-344_com.instagram.android.png

 

In my opinion it's stamp (the thing you dip in color then dip onto surfuce). For such a small dimensions I believe it could be flat - without curvature.

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  • 1 month later...

Hi all. There was recently some discussion about those diffraction grating sheets. I came across this video on YouTube I wanted to share. I think all in all, none of us would go through this process, and I would question the food safety aspect of it, but I still feel like many would find it interesting. 

 

 

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  • 4 weeks later...
7 minutes ago, Rajala said:

Team fake or team real? I'll go for fake.

 

fakeornot.thumb.jpg.ae55e38051ee57dcbf32a13bf2c470e4.jpg

 

I would say the reflection is easy to accomplish with the appropriate software. I fact, I think (but don't have all the time it would take to search) that this sort of reflection has been discussed on eG. I don't believe that in real life it would ever be so perfect. In theory the gradients are possible, but I've never heard of anyone who has the ability to control airbrush spray to that degree. And one would have to be a bit crazy to use tape. You didn't provide the source of the image.

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