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Bentley

How do they do that? (The bonbon thread)

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8 hours ago, gfron1 said:

I lost sleep over this last night.

 


And that's probably part of the reason you're running a successful cafe and preparing to open your dream restaurant while Judge Smails tells me the world needs ditch diggers too. :D

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On 12/18/2017 at 8:45 AM, curls said:

Cool video!  I think the tool might be an embossing stylus.

Yep you were right! (ignore the 5 small dots. They were from a light)

 

Thanks

 

cinnamon_red_dots.JPG.png

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On 13/02/2018 at 11:08 PM, gfron1 said:

I then zoomed in on my screen doing a 5x enlargement and you can then clearly see flaws in his ring.

 

Nice work. I agree - in fact, when you zoom in on that front ring, the right hand side, you can see that it looks like there's actually something behind the ring, some sort of support scaffold. I would have guessed paper or acetate but I can't think of anyone that would put that on a product for consumption.

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1 hour ago, keychris said:

 

Nice work. I agree - in fact, when you zoom in on that front ring, the right hand side, you can see that it looks like there's actually something behind the ring, some sort of support scaffold. I would have guessed paper or acetate but I can't think of anyone that would put that on a product for consumption.

When I enlarge the photos, it doesn't look to me like it's a ring around a solid bonbon.  The part below the ring looks wider at the top than the part above the ring and the lower part also seems to be curving inwards where it meets the ring.  .  To me, it looks like the top part is a separate tier.  Maybe it's an optical illusion.  Like I said in  my original post, I can't even figure out exactly what I am seeing, much less how to recreate it.  From what I can tell on his Instagram, Giorgio doesn't ever seem to answer questions about technique, so this one may remain a mystery.  

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I'm standing by my last answer. It is an optical illusion - simple dome mold with a wet choco ring pressed on after everything is said and done. If you do the zoom in at 10x and look at the back bonbon you'll see the major flaws. He put his best foot forward on this one and was liberal with photoshop. 

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I’m not sure if this is the right thread to share this, but I have seen a number of people posting in the past about tape that one could use to get an even, sharp stripe on bonbons. I have not seen a solution (correct me if I missed it) but I think I found the magical mystery tape. I spent some time perusing amazon and found a Scotch product called “artist tape for curves” and picked up a roll. This is the result. I’m also trying out these new cheap Amazon molds, so I took the photo before unmolding (I’m going to fill them tomorrow), in case they don’t release well. But the tape did it’s job well.

 

 

CFE09CB2-442F-4B39-A250-EDC1630DC246.jpeg


Edited by tikidoc (log)
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32 minutes ago, tikidoc said:

I’m not sure if this is the right thread to share this, but I have seen a number of people posting in the past about tape that one could use to get an even, sharp stripe on bonbons. I have not seen a solution (correct me if I missed it) but I think I found the magical mystery tape. I spent some time perusing amazon and found a Scotch product called “artist tape for curves” and picked up a roll. This is the result. I’m also trying out these new cheap Amazon molds, so I took the photo before unmolding (I’m going to fill them tomorrow), in case they don’t release well. But the tape did it’s job well.

 

 

I think that is the same tape that@pastrygirl said Melissa Coppel was using. I bought it under the Martha Stewart brand, and in the thread linked to below demonstrated that I could not make it work. So please tell us exactly what you did.

 

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The tape  I used.

 

it looks a lot like the tape Jim used (Martha Stewart stuff) but I don’t know if it’s the same. This tape is plastic-y, not paper, and slightly stretchy. It is easy to apply, and because of the stretch, you can even do gradual curves with it. I just pressed it onto the mold and made sure it was tightly applied, then sprayed my cocoa butter. Since I used 3 colors, all but the last color were totally set when I removed the tape, but it still came off cleanly.

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I also think it would be do-able in a dome, but you would have to go very slowly, so may not be worth it. Was very simple with the half sphere. It was adherent when pressed firmly to the mold, but not so sticky that it would stick where you didn’t want it to. I just ran my fingers over the tape after application. I think this particular stuff is pretty forgiving. I messed with a bit of the tape and do not think it would leave any adhesive on the mold.

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The new molds were not great - colors stuck to most of them, but here is an example of the finished bonbon with a stripe. 

767C14F2-C3A0-4C33-A7B2-76C0C604C4AB.jpeg


Edited by tikidoc (log)

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13 hours ago, tikidoc said:

The new molds were not great - colors stuck to most of them, but here is an example of the finished bonbon with a stripe. 

 

 

This look great. The stripe is still sharp after unmolding. I wish they made the tape you found in a wider size, but I could not find it. And speaking of finding the tape, it does not appear on the main Scotch site. If you do a search for it ("Artist Tape for Curves"), what comes up is "Artist Tape for Canvas," which may or may not be the same thing (of the three images provided, one of them is of "Artist Tape for Curves"--rather confusing). Also interesting is that on Amazon the "Curves" tape is listed as being 1/8" wide, but if you look closely at the image, the package says it is 1/6" wide. I think the crucial factor about the tape you found is that it is plastic and stretchy, not paper and therefore produces a sharper line.

 

What is the approximate diameter of the cavity of the mold you used?

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6 minutes ago, tikidoc said:

Account to the ad for the mold, 29mm.

Glad to hear that. My molds are 34mm in diameter. I was concerned that the narrow tape would make too small a stripe for my use, but that should be fine.

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Am I the only one who thinks, "mmm, chocolate leeches!" every time they see this mold?  xD

 

I do like this design, though.  Electric leeches!  I'm thinking splatter black, spray blue, scrape the line clean and back with yellow?

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47 minutes ago, pastrygirl said:

I'm thinking splatter black, spray blue, scrape the line clean and back with yellow?

 

"scrape the line clean"?  Now there is a task for a chocolatier's minion. What tool would be used? A carefully applied ice pick? With the cost of labor on this piece, ignoring the ingredients, they must be priced around $50 each.

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4 minutes ago, Jim D. said:

"scrape the line clean"?  Now there is a task for a chocolatier's minion. What tool would be used?

 

Maybe a wooden toothpick? 

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This is not sarcastic, I'm asking this in all sincerity... why wouldn't it be easier to paint the yellow line in with a brush, spatter with black, then back with the blue? It would still be a lot of work painting all those lines in but it seems to me like it would be easier than trying to cleanly scrape colors away.

Edit: the more I look at the picture, the more I'm convinced on the paint them in idea. It looks to me like a perfect example is being held in the foreground. Some in the background look like they have areas of heavier yellow in the line that could have been a start and stop point with the brush.


Edited by Tri2Cook (log)

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I would agree with Tri2Cook. Paint yellow line first - because you can see some areas where the color behind the yellow is blueish.

 

I’ve done a bar mold using the spray/scrap method. I sprayed black, scraped away with a chopstick, then backed the areas I scraped in gold. Worked out well!

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1 hour ago, Tri2Cook said:

This is not sarcastic, I'm asking this in all sincerity... why wouldn't it be easier to paint the yellow line in with a brush, spatter with black, then back with the blue? It would still be a lot of work painting all those lines in but it seems to me like it would be easier than trying to cleanly scrape colors away.

 

Maybe it is!  Personally I think trying to get an even line with a tiny brush would be the greater form of painstaking tedium, but you have a good point about the heavy spots that could be brush stops and starts.  Oddly enough, another chocolatier has something similar on Instagram today ...

 

 

And aside from the leech-iness, what boxes do these fit in?  9_9


Edited by pastrygirl (log)

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I'd use my little silicone tipped clay tool to scrape then back with yellow. Painting a tiny line is tedious!

 

When you scrape with a tool - the tool follows the curves really easily and gives a nice line.

 

IMG_2183.jpg.3914f5975dde54ae89a7fcc5873dd800.jpg

 

These are done with a quick scrape (or two). 


Edited by Kerry Beal (log)
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12 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

I'd use my little silicone tipped clay tool to scrape then back with yellow. Painting a tiny line is tedious!


I believe you and pastrygirl, you're both much more experienced at this than I am. I was just picturing me trying to scrape color off and about the fifth or sixth time the scraping caused big flakes of the color to break away, me saying a few discouraging words as the mold went sailing towards the trashcan. :D

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7 minutes ago, Tri2Cook said:


I believe you and pastrygirl, you're both much more experienced at this than I am. I was just picturing me trying to scrape color off and about the fifth or sixth time the scraping caused big flakes of the color to break away, me saying a few discouraging words as the mold went sailing towards the trashcan. :D

No flakes though - scraped while they are still wet.

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