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Bentley

How do they do that? (The bonbon thread)

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2 hours ago, gfron1 said:

The technique at 11:45 is so simple yet so stunning. I will totally rip that off!


It is nice... but they didn't actually show us how they did it and I'm apparently not smart enough to figure it out just by seeing the result.

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2 hours ago, gfron1 said:

First, rapping the tray with a wooden rolling pin. Brilliant since I have so many marrings from rapping my drywall spat.

 

Even when using the handle, not the blade?

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3 hours ago, Jim D. said:

I was planning to get a Fuji until I saw it in action in Las Vegas--it's just overkill for me.

I was an early adopter and finally sold it for that very reason. I found it much more useful for velvet effect-ing my entremets than my chocolates.

3 hours ago, Tri2Cook said:

It is nice... but they didn't actually show us how they did it and I'm apparently not smart enough to figure it out just by seeing the result.

Very simple - brushed color, 1/6 turn, brushed color, 1/6 turn...on and on using just the right colors to create the iridescence.

3 hours ago, pastrygirl said:

Even when using the handle, not the blade?

I use both. I know its bad, but depends on my control for the day.

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12 hours ago, Jim D. said:

All it requires is a trip to a slightly expensive restaurant in Las Vegas or, in the case of the some of the techniques I recognized, to Savour school in Australia!

 

Well if that's all...

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12 hours ago, Tri2Cook said:


It is nice... but they didn't actually show us how they did it and I'm apparently not smart enough to figure it out just by seeing the result.

Rob has it right....but here is a video of Susanna Yoon at Stick With Me Sweets in NYC making these Bon Bons from start to finish...the painting is at about 0:46.  

 

http://www.instyle.com/videos/stick-with-me-sweets-how-to-make-bonbons


Edited by Bentley (log)
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12 hours ago, Bentley said:

Rob has it right....but here is a video of Susanna Yoon at Stick With Me Sweets in NYC making these Bon Bons from start to finish...the painting is at about 0:46.  

http://www.instyle.com/videos/stick-with-me-sweets-how-to-make-bonbons

 

This answered my question of whether they sprayed a white or black coating after the colored brush strokes - no, they just pour the shell and still kept those colors.

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20 hours ago, gfron1 said:

 

Very simple - brushed color, 1/6 turn, brushed color, 1/6 turn...on and on using just the right colors to create the iridescence.


Makes sense. It didn't look that simple in the pictures, it looked like some colors were slashing through parts of other colors causing almost a semi-latticed look in small areas. Glad to hear it's something simple after all.
 

12 hours ago, Bentley said:

Rob has it right....but here is a video of Susanna Yoon at Stick With Me Sweets in NYC making these Bon Bons from start to finish...the painting is at about 0:46.  

 

http://www.instyle.com/videos/stick-with-me-sweets-how-to-make-bonbons

 


Thanks for that!

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5 hours ago, gfron1 said:

This answered my question of whether they sprayed a white or black coating after the colored brush strokes - no, they just pour the shell and still kept those colors.

Titanium in the colour ftw :D

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Saw this one today. While I can see a slow way to do this I'm hoping someone can describe the faster time efficient method.Screenshot_20180209-172049.thumb.png.9be8356b74b09f33d6dddee72d1453ba.png

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That looks to me to just be overlapping  finger swipes .  Finger swipe one color, let it crystalize, then swipe the next color, etc.  

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10 hours ago, Bentley said:

That looks to me to just be overlapping  finger swipes .  Finger swipe one color, let it crystalize, then swipe the next color, etc.  

That would be at least 8 swipes from what I see. times 30 cavities x number of trays for an operation as large as them....hmmm...maybe. The distinct lines also make me question whether that's how its done. I can totally see that working, but that would make more sense in a competition where you have a smaller volume that Valentines production.

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Perhaps drops of colour - sponge or brush touches all then one swipe lays down the striped effect

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20 hours ago, Bentley said:

That looks to me to just be overlapping  finger swipes .  Finger swipe one color, let it crystalize, then swipe the next color, etc.  

 

The squared shape makes me think a paintbrush rather than a finger, but I agree. I think it's only 3 or 4 steps, not 8.  Brush teal, brush white, a bit more thorough with the purple ... mold in dark

The lower left one especially looks like a paintbrush.  I think it's not that many layers, just streaks showing through.

5a7f80aca1dcc_ScreenShot2018-02-10at3_27_24PM.png.b11153b18b874a66d01d15e892f68466.png

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You can get that distinct line by putting more pressure on the inside of your finger than the outside

 

We also know that Susanna is not opposed to tedious designs that take multiple passes - just reference her New York,  NY bonbon from earlier in this thread where she did one brushstroke each of six or so colors.    

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Here's another one that I am curious about.  I am not even exactly sure about what is going on here.  are there two separate red pieces separated by that black ring or is that black ring just wrapped around the shell?

 

 

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5 minutes ago, Bentley said:

Here's another one that I am curious about.  I am not even exactly sure about what is going on here.  are there two separate red pieces separated by that black ring or is that black ring just wrapped around the shell?

 

 

Looking at some of the other things he's done in the same mold - I wonder if he lays the ring in the mold then does his decoration.

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1 hour ago, Kerry Beal said:

Looking at some of the other things he's done in the same mold - I wonder if he lays the ring in the mold then does his decoration.

Interesting possibility.  My first thought is that the ring would either melt into the shell ( I assume it's a thin band of white chocolate colored black) or there would  be difficulty in getting the bonbon to release from the mold.    I also wonder if there owuld be issues with the ring falling out or dislocating when you flip the mold the remove the chocolate to create the shell.

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Regarding the Salvatore Martone snipped ballpoint pen technique from earlier in this thread:  The pens I have don't have the apparent taper shown in his video, so they end up being a straight hollow tube. For me, it wasn't so easy a process as he makes it look. First, some of the ink got out of the pen onto my hands (wear gloves next time!). The tube was a bit too large to fit into the Grex airbrush, so I basically had to hold it in place while airbrushing. I noticed that Martone also holds the tube, but his fits into the nozzle and so is more secure. The good news: The arrangement does produce splatter. I'm not sure why lengthening the path of the cocoa butter creates splatter, but it does. The bad news: The splatter isn't reliable in size, and as soon as the tube gets some crystallized c.b. in it, the output is greatly reduced. I think technique would improve with lots of practice, and it certainly is the least messy way of producing splatter with a regular airbrush.

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Here's my theory. Large hole pastry tip dipped in tempered chocolate, pressed into bottom of dome mold leaving ring. Then splatter and spray.

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10 minutes ago, gfron1 said:

Here's my theory. Large hole pastry tip dipped in tempered chocolate, pressed into bottom of dome mold leaving ring. Then splatter and spray.

 

But the ring appears matte, as if it was not tempered chocolate against the mold.  Maybe a small round tool dipped in dark chocolate and applied after de-molding?

 

 

 

 

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Interesting things to try.  I need to up my creative thinking...you guys are amazing.  By the way, @gfron1 I saw your Valentines Day chocolates on instagram. Really nice.  I see the Asian strainer made a comeback.   


Edited by Bentley (log)
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1 hour ago, Bentley said:

Interesting things to try.  I need to up my creative thinking...you guys are amazing.  By the way, @gfron1 I saw your Valentines Day chocolates on instagram. Really nice.  I see the Asian strainer made a comeback.   

I'm constantly on the lookout for Asian strainer v.2.0  That one was my fennel pollen honey ganache

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11 hours ago, pastrygirl said:

But the ring appears matte, as if it was not tempered chocolate against the mold.  Maybe a small round tool dipped in dark chocolate and applied after de-molding?

Can anyone say what mould that is? It would make it easier to work it out.


Edited by keychris (log)

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Tried out a couple of these recent techniques. Just quick goes while my cb was warmed up. I dipped a pastry tip in tempered chocolate for the rings. I'm more confident than before that with the right tip I could replicate exactly.

IMG_20180212_164126.thumb.jpg.b98ba22c2577709d2b3e715877e636c6.jpgIMG_20180212_164120.thumb.jpg.5b21db1e3ab50c4baef5582dfb4d96a2.jpgIMG_20180212_161944.thumb.jpg.532034bf29d79ca3d287e5a697351765.jpg

Then here's the multiple finger swirls. Less success. Also tried out the thin painters tape. Good but not good enough for me to use. I saw a video where the chef had a clear acetate looking tape. Not sure what that was.

IMG_20180212_101546.jpg

IMG_20180212_164136.jpg

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I lost sleep over this last night. While I could perfect the size of the pastry tip and the amount of chocolate on the tip when its pressed into the mold, the matte finish that @pastrygirl mentioned above is still bothering me.


So let's say that you dropped a chocolate ring into the mold. And, let's assume that you could form a ring, release it from whatever surface you formed it on, and you could move it into the mold without breaking it. Yes, that would get you the matte finish. But, that would cause problems when you go to spray because there would be a slight ridge that the spray would have to work around. I then zoomed in on my screen doing a 5x enlargement and you can then clearly see flaws in his ring.


My new conclusion - Make chocolate as normal, remove it from the mold, then take a large pastry tip or other ring, dip it in chocolate and press it onto the finished bonbon. That solves all of the problems and would give you a matte ring with no void or shadow from the spray, and would be doable (v. overly fragile).

 

I consider this mystery solved.


Edited by gfron1 (log)
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