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Dinner 2017 (Part 4)


mm84321
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Tonight I made seafood cakes using frozen Patagonian scallops and a small filet of flounder to make cakes using a dollop of mayo/sour cream  mixed with panko as a binder.   Liked the little bit of sour cream in the mix.   

 

Served with sautéed corn and sliced green beans with a touch of onion and a  lettuce and tomatoes salad 

 

 

 

 

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Typically I don't do fussy presentations, but given the fact that I only get wild, fresh WA morels once a year, and the first of our crop of WA asparagus, I put on a few extra touches with this dish.  I've been doing a dish of steamed asparagus and hollandaise with crispy prosciutto for years, but I wanted to work in the fresh fava beans I found at the market and the wild morels.  And I happened to find some extra small oysters harvested from off the Oregon Coast, so I thought the ingredients might make a good Spring dish.

 

I fried oysters in a garlic dry mix from out local Korean market.  You can add water or beer to make a batter, but I like to just dredge meat or seafood in the dry mix and it fries up very crispy.  Then a basic hollandaise for the dressing on the bottom of the plate.  The morels were simply steamed, but I also like to saute them in butter and garlic.  Then the fava beans and the trimmed asparagus blanched.  I always trim the asparagus spears which gives them a very tender texture.  Then a few little celery leaves tossed in olive oil for garnish and a few fresh marjoram leaves.  Really delicious and now in my Spring recipe files.

 

IMG_2046.JPG

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15 hours ago, David Ross said:

Typically I don't do fussy presentations, but given the fact that I only get wild, fresh WA morels once a year, and the first of our crop of WA asparagus, I put on a few extra touches with this dish.  I've been doing a dish of steamed asparagus and hollandaise with crispy prosciutto for years, but I wanted to work in the fresh fava beans I found at the market and the wild morels.  And I happened to find some extra small oysters harvested from off the Oregon Coast, so I thought the ingredients might make a good Spring dish.

 

I fried oysters in a garlic dry mix from out local Korean market.  You can add water or beer to make a batter, but I like to just dredge meat or seafood in the dry mix and it fries up very crispy.  Then a basic hollandaise for the dressing on the bottom of the plate.  The morels were simply steamed, but I also like to saute them in butter and garlic.  Then the fava beans and the trimmed asparagus blanched.  I always trim the asparagus spears which gives them a very tender texture.  Then a few little celery leaves tossed in olive oil for garnish and a few fresh marjoram leaves.  Really delicious and now in my Spring recipe files.

 

IMG_2046.JPG

 

I would pay to eat this dish!

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Back to normal programming- Chettinad black pepper chicken, rice, roti, tomato chutney, chana dal with spinach, date & tamarind chutney, lime pickle, eggplant masala.

 

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6 oz chuck burger that was still a touch frozen in the middle when it hit the comal.   Lead to some great crust development and flavor.  A corn relish and leftover potato salad were  adequate sides 

 

 

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NY Times creamed chicken:

https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/6378-creamed-chicken

 

Rice, peas -- and because I'm from where I am, whole berry cranberry sauce.  I don't believe I've ever served creamed chicken before*.  I feel ill.  Moderation is not my middle name.

 

 

*Save as a component of chicken Tetrazzini.

 

Edited by JoNorvelleWalker
grammar (log)
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Every now and then the classic Salisbury steak peaks my interest enough to give it a try. I do feel that French onion soup, Worcestershire sauce and mustard powder are part of what I am after and I added garlic, shallots and dry sherry, but the ketchup called for in the recipe added a bit of sweetness that I found unwelcome in the pan sauce and I will eliminate it and use beef stock and tomato paste in my next attempt. The tenderness that comes from a 20 minute simmer in the pan, with the sauce, was perfect and it was a nice little change, even if it is a work in progress.

HC

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Edited by HungryChris (log)
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Matar pilau (peas and rice) potato & cabbage curry, chana dal with spinach, eggplant masala and store bought roti.  On the side, radish raita and mango chutney.

 

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@Norm Matthews – I love the look of that Pineapple Upside Down Bundt cake!  I’ve made not of your directions and will be giving that a try.  Looks perfect for a church supper!

 

@Shelby – Yay for the angel food cake success.  It is one of my favorite cakes and Michael’s is a great recipe.  Mr. Kim’s family tradition is angel food cake with caramel sauce, (really just melted Kraft caramels – but try it with dulce de leche.  Heavenly.

 

I always wonder if anyone else is weird like me – when I hit the ‘like’ button, I often wish I could add a comment – “well, except for those…”.  For me it is mostly vegetables, spicy stuff and any and all fungi.  I’ll see a delicious looking pizza and then notice that it has mushrooms, or an otherwise great meal served with asparagus or zucchini or beets – do I hit ‘like’ or not?  It’s a dilemma! :P

 

I’ve been dealing with family health issues in the last couple of months, so I haven’t been cooking much less posting, but I’m hoping to get caught up and KEEP UP! 

 

Some recent meals:

Brunswick stew and BBQ – all from Short Sugar’s in Reidsville, NC:

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Mr. Kim made some sauce - spaghetti sauce w/ bucatini:

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Chili dogs w/ tots:

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Easter dinner – started with Gougeres and crab meltaways: 

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Cook’s Country Cider-Glazed Ham:

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Chicken-Pineapple Pasta Salad :

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St. Paul’s Cheese Souffle:

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Green Beans:

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Sweet Potato Souffle:

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Southern Creamed corn:

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Devilled eggs:

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Paula Deen’s Strawberry Mold:

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Creamy Fruit Salad:

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This was brought by a friend.

 

Another meal was salad and a use-up-the-Easter-eggs sandwich:

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That is sliced hard boiled egg, ham and egg salad.  This is a combination that I became enamored of when we were in England.  I got it at a convenience store and it was incredibly (and surprisingly) good and I’ve made them ever since.

 

Salad and chicken Marsala:

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This was actually a Trisha Yearwood recipe.  We saw her make this on TV and it looked really good. Mr. Kim was in the mood for something chicken-y and saucy and this fit the bill. Very easy and it reheats very well. I served it with rice. 

 

Mr. Kim smoked a couple of butts to put in the freezer for his sister to serve a our niece’s Suzanne’s graduation party:

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Maybe his best yet!

 

More chili dogs:

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Carolina style this time.

 

Roasted shrimp cocktail and some of Mr. Kim’s BBQ:

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Along with my slaw and some of my favorite Wegman’s pasta salad.

 

My sister and her husband visited from Florida.  Colleyberry’s Shepherd’s Pie for dinner:

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This is a recipe that I got years ago from Marlene.  It is better than any other I’ve ever made.

 

I made some gravy to go with it because everything is better with extra gravy:

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Plated:

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Is there any way to serve Shepherd’s Pie that doesn’t look like the dog’s dinner?  It was delicious, though!

 

Served with a green salad w/ strawberries and pineapple and strawberry vinaigrette:

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And Billy bread:

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Local baker.

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Dinner tonight:

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Bangers from Wegman’s, fixed up mac n cheese and broccoli.  We really liked the sausages, but not a clue whether they are authentic or not.

 

 

 

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I'm tending to do a lot of pasta, usually angel hair, as a first course, because it's a comfort food to me. I had milk yesterday, so I made a creamy herb sauce for it. This one I like without any cheese. I've tried it both ways, but the cheese has nothing to add to the cooked milk sauce to my taste. Usually it's butter, pasta water and parm with parsley, crushed red pepper and garlic, and sometimes marinara and parm. Occasionally, if I've bought fresh mushrooms I'll saute those in the butter and add to the butter and cheese version. If I have shrimp, those will go into that version too. This is my favorite right now, so it's always a good day when I allow myself to indulge in any of the versions.

 

I follow that with a salad or vegetable and a ground chuck "steak" plain. The frozen 4 oz., hand-pattied burgers are perfect for single eaters, because they can be pulled from the freezer any time you want, and cooked immediately or placed in the the fridge and cooked about two hours later, which is my preference. It's easier to get a four ounce burger with a good crust that is nice and crispy, but juicy and pink in the middle if it's still icy.

 

Recently I've made cheese enchiladas with white American and a little pepper jack, which is not really hot at all, so I spiced that up with minced jalapenos sprinkled into the filling. I lightened them up with half a zucchini grated, salted and drained of excess moisture in a colander. I got this idea from the local Torerro's Restaurant that serves seafood enchiladas that have zucchini in them. This Mexican-themed meal was served with La Costena brand frioles topped with pepper jack cheese, and Taco Bell bottled hot taco sauce. I also made pico de gallo and finely shredded iceberg to go with it and heated some store bought tortilla chips in my small Dutch oven. I like spreading the refried beans and melted cheese on the chips and topping them with lettuce and salsa.

 

I saw some habanero jack the other day, so that may make an appearance in my ingredients later after I get my cheese inventory under control. I doubt that will disappoint me in the spicy department.

 

Tonight was split pea soup with my Southern Indian and Southern American cornbread pancakes doctored up like Indian uttapam with minced onion, and jalapeno, thawed frozen English peas and grated carrot cooked into one side. I really enjoy these, and went ahead and made a whole batch, which makes 14. I pigged out on 3, but have been known to eat as many as 4. The rest went into the freezer, which is also ideal for a single eater, because you can pop them into the toaster from frozen, whenever you want a delicious snack or side.

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> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

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Asparaguses in French pastry. This time I prepared green asparaguses (they are back at least in Poland :)) with smoked salmon, mozzarella cheese and fresh spinach. I wrapped it in French pastry and created a light dinner dish which was completed with cherry tomatoes.


Ingredients (for 2 people)
1 pack of chilled French pastry
1 bunch of asparagus
2 fistfuls of fresh spinach
150g of smoked salmon
150g of mozzarella cheese
2 tablespoons of sesame seeds
2 tablespoons of nigella
2 tablespoons of milk
2 cloves of garlic
salt and pepper


Heat the oven up to 180C. Cover a baking sheet with baking paper.
Cut across the French pastry to make two rectangles. Slice the garlic. Clean the asparaguses and remove the lignified pieces. Slice the mozzarella cheese.
Place the spinach, garlic, asparaguses, salmon and mozzarella cheese down the center of the pastry from top to bottom, at a width of 1/3 of the pastry. Spice it up with salt and pepper. Cut notches into the French pastry on either side of the stuffing to make 1.5 cm-long strips. Braid the pastry by crossing the strips, alternating from right to left to make a plait. Don't stick the strips together. Smooth the dough with milk and sprinkle with the sesame seeds and nigella. Wrap the tops of the asparaguses in aluminium foil to avoid burning them. Bake for 20 minutes. Remove the foil and bake for 3-4 minutes. Serve at once.

 

 

 

IMG_0340a.jpg

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Kasia Warsaw/Poland

www.home-madepatchwork.com

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On May 11, 2017 at 0:50 PM, David Ross said:

Typically I don't do fussy presentations, but given the fact that I only get wild, fresh WA morels once a year, and the first of our crop of WA asparagus, I put on a few extra touches with this dish.  I've been doing a dish of steamed asparagus and hollandaise with crispy prosciutto for years, but I wanted to work in the fresh fava beans I found at the market and the wild morels.  And I happened to find some extra small oysters harvested from off the Oregon Coast, so I thought the ingredients might make a good Spring dish.

 

I fried oysters in a garlic dry mix from out local Korean market.  You can add water or beer to make a batter, but I like to just dredge meat or seafood in the dry mix and it fries up very crispy.  Then a basic hollandaise for the dressing on the bottom of the plate.  The morels were simply steamed, but I also like to saute them in butter and garlic.  Then the fava beans and the trimmed asparagus blanched.  I always trim the asparagus spears which gives them a very tender texture.  Then a few little celery leaves tossed in olive oil for garnish and a few fresh marjoram leaves.  Really delicious and now in my Spring recipe files.

 

IMG_2046.JPG

I would enjoy this so much right now. I am really missing the spring harvest in the northern hemisphere..

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We had small steaks last night, just about the perfect size, I think, at 1/2 lb each. Jersey Knight asparagus from the garden (I think this will be the last I cut this season). Since we finally got the garage floor poured, after many rain delays, we opened up a red wine to have with it.

HC

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