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bonkboo

Got my Taylor 9306N wet in battery area

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At least the battery area.  Looks like display has some water as well.  Is it toast?  Or are there tricks to save?  

 

Thanks

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Not necessarily.  Never underestimate the possibility of drying out soggy electronics.  I once dropped a cell phone in 8" of bloody goo in the bottom of a failed freezer unit.   A combination of partial disassembly, a commercial dessicant (Dry-Eaze in a ziplock bag for 2 days) and another day in a very low oven restored it to 95% functionality.

 

What do you have to lose?   

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An alternative to a commercial desiccant is rice (uncooked of course)

 

p

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Why not pop it into a chamber vac or a vacuum marinating jar?

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10 hours ago, palo said:

An alternative to a commercial desiccant is rice (uncooked of course)

 

p

I think rice as a desiccant may be one of those myths.

"But I always put rice in salt to keep salt dry"

In fact, the opposite is true, it is the salt that is keeping the rice dry.

 

Salt is an excellent drying agent. If you don't bag your ice melt salt well, soon the salt will turn into water. That is because it draws moisture from the air very effectively.

 

dcarch

 

 

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15 hours ago, boilsover said:

Not necessarily.  Never underestimate the possibility of drying out soggy electronics.  I once dropped a cell phone in 8" of bloody goo in the bottom of a failed freezer unit.   A combination of partial disassembly, a commercial dessicant (Dry-Eaze in a ziplock bag for 2 days) and another day in a very low oven restored it to 95% functionality.

 

What do you have to lose?   

 

95%?? what was the 5%?


Wawa Sizzli FTW!

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1 hour ago, dcarch said:

I think rice as a desiccant may be one of those myths.

dcarch

 

 

I've used this method with a cell phone that had been dropped in the lake and it worked for me.

 

However after googling the question, I stand corrected. It is a myth, it is not a desiccant!

 

Yet what do you have to lose?

 

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7 hours ago, GlorifiedRice said:

 

95%?? what was the 5%?

 

I could only use the phone in speakerphone mode.  It was otherwise fully functional.


Edited by boilsover (log)

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still like the vacuum idea

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28 minutes ago, gfweb said:

still like the vacuum idea

Vacuum is a great dehydrating method. 

Water vaporizes quickly under vacuum.

 

dcarch

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2 hours ago, paulraphael said:

Just make sure there aren't any hermetically sealed parts that could explode ...

Good advice!!!

There will be problem with the Lithium battery if vacuumed.

 

dcarch

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