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liuzhou

liuzhou

58c29e6de0659_roumoqiezi.thumb.jpg.9388b4e9a5381f84fd3a92a60e9ecf99.jpg

 

Last night, I had an online conversation with a friend in the next city and she mentioned that she had had 茄子肉末 qiézi ròumò or aubergine/eggplant with minced pork for dinner. That sounded good.

 

But instead I made 肉沫茄子 ròumò qiézi  or minced pork with aubergine/eggplant. What, you may ask is the difference? Well, it's subtle. Chinese restaurants tend to put the dominant ingredient first. So 茄子肉末 will be more vegetable while 肉沫茄子 will be more meat. I have even seen both on same menu in some restaurants.

Served with Shanghai bok choy (上海白菜 shànghǎi bái cài) and rice.

 

Before I came to China I never associated aubergine/eggplant with Chinese cuisine, but there are some wonderful dishes using it. This one is one of my favourites, though. Fuchsia Dunlop does a fine version in Land of Fish and Rice.(page 203).

 

The only "exotic" ingredient is Sweet Fermented Sauce (甜面酱 tián miàn jiàng), but it should be available in any Asian market.

tianmianjiang.thumb.jpg.a39530dfa592aa1b576801a2ba9e3d0b.jpg

 

tianmianjiang2.thumb.jpg.0fcfc0ca26924736c9b896fca2db696e.jpg

liuzhou

liuzhou

58c29e6de0659_roumoqiezi.thumb.jpg.9388b4e9a5381f84fd3a92a60e9ecf99.jpg

 

Last night, I had an online conversation with a friend in the next city and she mentioned that she had had 茄子肉末 qiézi ròumò or aubergine/eggplant with minced pork for dinner. That sounded good.

 

But instead I made 肉沫茄子 ròumò qiézi  or minced pork with aubergine/eggplant. What, you may ask is the difference? Well, it's subtle. Chinese restaurants tend to put the dominant ingredient first. So 茄子肉末 will be more vegetable while 肉沫茄子 will be more meat. I have even seen both on same menu in some restaurants.

 

Before I came to China I never associated aubergine/eggplant with Chinese cuisine,but there are some wonderful dishes using it. This one is one of my favourites, though. Fuchsia Dunlop does a fine version in Land of Fish and Rice.(page 203).

 

The only "exotic" ingredient is Sweet Fermented Sauce (甜面酱 tián miàn jiàng), but it should be available in any Asian market.

tianmianjiang.thumb.jpg.a39530dfa592aa1b576801a2ba9e3d0b.jpg

 

tianmianjiang2.thumb.jpg.0fcfc0ca26924736c9b896fca2db696e.jpg

 

 

shànghǎi bái    cài

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