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heidih

2017 releases

29 posts in this topic

54 minutes ago, Anna N said:

 On the whole I am really, really into this book (Six Seasons) but the huge caveat is that there are no live links in the index of the Kindle version. This means that you must use the search feature.   It is a damned nuisance and in a lesser book might be a deal breaker.  On the other hand most of the recipes rely on ingredients that almost anyone who reads and uses eG will find in their cupboards or fridges. I have just stocked up on some fresh produce and hope to be posting some of the recipes in the appropriate (or, knowing me - inappropriate) meal threads soon. 

 

I am more than smiling to myself after reading  this review of On Vegetables.

 

"It is a well-known adage that cookbooks written by renowned chefs are best enjoyed in an armchair far from the kitchen lest the home cook end up in a pool of tears when trying to execute one of its recipes. With that in mind, On Vegetables, written by Jeremy Fox (the award-winning California chef who previously ran the Michelin-starred Ubuntu in Napa), does not disappoint."

 

 It is refreshing to read a review that acknowledges that not all cookbooks are appropriate for all cooks.xD

 

 The two books are about as far apart as it is possible to get on any sort of continuum of how to cook vegetables.  That is not to say that one is better than the other only that one will appeal to some and one will appeal to others.  I will let you guess which camp I fall into.

 

There is also a recipe in the LA Times from the Fox book for Carrot Juice Cavatelli.  I did not give a link because it seems to be behind some sort of wall but it is mostly available so Google it if you're interested.  The recipe calls for enough sub recipes to almost fill a booklet on its own. But I do know there are people who read eG for whom this is a challenge to be met  and I admire them for it.

 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Thanks everyone, very helpful. My preferences are exactly those "more complicated" books that have many sub recipes, which are always excellent ideas for the larder and combining generally in home cooking.. 

So it's more of inspiration and ideas, i think most of us "steal" some things here and there from the complicated books, i guess very few really go all the way and prepare whole dishes, at least when it comes to the 

"really complicated books". 

  

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On the Side: A Sourcebook of Inspiring Side Dishes by Ed Smith. 

 

 This is a British book that caught my eye when I was exploring something else entirely.   I am by no means far enough into the book to offer any sort of review  but did want to comment on something I have never before seen in a cookbook.   Ed Smith acknowledges the limitations of most home kitchens.  He notes that most home cooks are limited to one oven and can, at best, hope to use three burners.  Each of his recipes includes a note at the very beginning as to which of these scarce resources will be needed.  


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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On May 14, 2017 at 7:06 PM, Anna N said:

On the Side: A Sourcebook of Inspiring Side Dishes by Ed Smith. 

 

 This is a British book that caught my eye when I was exploring something else entirely.   I am by no means far enough into the book to offer any sort of review  but did want to comment on something I have never before seen in a cookbook.   Ed Smith acknowledges the limitations of most home kitchens.  He notes that most home cooks are limited to one oven and can, at best, hope to use three burners.  Each of his recipes includes a note at the very beginning as to which of these scarce resources will be needed.  

I wanted to add a couple of comments. First of all it is relatively unusual to find that a cookbook author is also the food and prop stylist for the book.  So far every recipe I have come across is accompanied by a photograph of the finished dish so that is a lot of styling.

 

And then there is this:

 

"Bunched spinach requires a thorough wash: fill the sink or a large bowl with cold water, add the spinach and give it a good fondle."

 

How can you not show an interest in a book that suggests that you fondle your spinach?

 

Carry on.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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