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6 minutes ago, shain said:

 

Thanks. Not sure of the variety I think it is Kent or Keitt, possibly an hybrid.

I thought it looked like a Keitt - but it's hard to tell from the photo.  I just finished a box of about 25 of them! (grown in Mexico). 

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25 minutes ago, KennethT said:

I thought it looked like a Keitt - but it's hard to tell from the photo.  I just finished a box of about 25 of them! (grown in Mexico). 

 

:) I love those mangoes. It's the second best I had, when picked ripe. Best I had was grown by a friend from chance breeding (mangoes are prone to mutate when grown from seed, though not as much s apples do).

I like it being low on fiber, good tartness-to sweetness ratio and having hints of coconut and orange.

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~ Shai N.

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27 minutes ago, shain said:

 

:) I love those mangoes. It's the second best I had, when picked ripe. Best I had was grown by a friend from chance breeding (mangoes are prone to mutate when grown from seed, though not as much s apples do).

I like it being low on fiber, good tartness-to sweetness ratio and having hints of coconut and orange.

exactly!

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  • 4 weeks later...
2 hours ago, shain said:

Annona, gift from a neighbor. I didn't know that they come in red (only ever seen the green type).

o good. To me it tastes like pears and vanilla ice cream.

 

 

PXL_20201108_112437309.jpg

 

That red is stunning.  I am not a custardy fruit person - why my neighbor loved me as I let him have all the white figs he wanted. One place I lived had a cherimoya (related I think) It was big! Owner did not enjoy the fruit so all the Asian and Latin old ladies schlepped over with their bags and filled up (in front yard). I can still smell that sweetness during peak season as the kids rode their bikes and skateboards over them on sidewalk. Took dog across road to avoid stickiness. Now I miss it...and the neighbors

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38 minutes ago, heidih said:

That red is stunning.  I am not a custardy fruit person - why my neighbor loved me as I let him have all the white figs he wanted. One place I lived had a cherimoya (related I think) It was big! Owner did not enjoy the fruit so all the Asian and Latin old ladies schlepped over with their bags and filled up (in front yard). I can still smell that sweetness during peak season as the kids rode their bikes and skateboards over them on sidewalk. Took dog across road to avoid stickiness. Now I miss it...and the neighbors

 

Actually some of the fruits were very ripe and custrady but the rest much less so, somewhere between the very custrady ones and a lychee.

~ Shai N.

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1 minute ago, shain said:

 

Actually some of the fruits were very ripe and custrady but the rest much less so, somewhere between the very custrady ones and a lychee.

 

Ah!  lychee in ice water and popped free from skins - perfect outside on a hot day with friends :)

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  • 1 month later...

I love pomelos! We don't have a tree, but we exchange oranges and mandarins with neighbors for them every winter.

They are also great in salads.

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~ Shai N.

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16 minutes ago, shain said:

I love pomelos! We don't have a tree, but we exchange oranges and mandarins with neighbors for them every winter.

They are also great in salads.

 

Agreed. Round here the peel is also processed and braised with pork.

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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1 hour ago, liuzhou said:

Pomelo pith is made into a marmalade-resembling product here.

 

764612044_PomeloTea.thumb.jpg.f29baf7916cf7f0789714b26607cd855.jpg

 

92949966_PomeloTea2.thumb.jpg.2b12d906df8c6b71d1ad54d760ac16f6.jpg

 

Despite its appearance, it is in fact, used for making pomelo tea.

 

Yes - I enjoy the similar Korean one with honey that I think is citron though I see it as yuzu as well. . A cure-all they say.  Haioreum Honey Citron Tea

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  • 5 weeks later...

It's New Year's Day - Year of the Ox. Perfect time for the market to be selling these.


459876400_20210212_1644181.thumb.jpg.6179d9e86c766bd8f640fccc9349093a.jpg

 

They have two names in Chinese. 贡柑 (gòng gān), meaning "Tribute Tangerine". "Tribute" applied to food usually means that it was once reserved for the Emperor and his household. Commoners would be executed for eating them.

 

The second name is 发财柑 (fā cái gān), meaning "Get Rich Tangerine". 发财 (fā cái) is the Mandarin version of "fat choy" as featured in the Cantonese new year greeting, 恭喜发财 / 恭喜發財 (gong hei fat choy) which means "wishing you great happiness and riches". In Mandarin, this expression is rarely used and Chinese people here are baffled as to why foreigners address them in Cantonese, a language fewer than 10% speak! And the few who do live mainly in the south and Hong Kong. The most common greeting elsewhere is a simple 新年快乐 (xīn nián kuài ), meaning "Happy New Year".

 

Now, you are probably thinking 'tangerines! those small orange-like fruits!' These are like no other tangerines. They are huge.

 

1069687124_20210212_1644311.thumb.jpg.39d44a79bf5d097fef7093b47f6f01a4.jpg

 

They are also incrediby juicy. I ate the one on the right and needed a shower! Biting into it is like I imagine it would be biting into a water-filled balloon. Next time, I'll just eat them in the shower.

 

The also contain a lot of seeds and are quite bitter - but not unpleasantly so.

 

1204641682_20210212_1646361.thumb.jpg.3964a988b8b477f18009d1947279ddd9.jpg

 

I have attempted to find an English or Latin name, but failed. So far.

 

Edited by liuzhou (log)
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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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  • 3 weeks later...

I don't seek out raspberries and similar though I do pick our local ones when on a canyon trail and they are ripe and within reach. My sister is a huge boysenberry fan. Supposedly originated locally. First preserves I ever made were boysenberry for her Christmas gift as a teen, Clueless about canning so I sealed jar with wax. Local newsletter just announced a festival. I sent her the link to torment her.

History: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boysenberry

Festival:  https://www.knotts.com/events/taste-of-boysenberry-festival

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