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liuzhou

Fruit

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1 hour ago, liuzhou said:

@teonzo

 

Here they are when newly picked.

 

jujubes.thumb.jpg.85aa53c8061763ee50d04f796ccfa7df.jpg

 

and when nearly all drying

jujubes2.thumb.jpg.d057b497a3b40ea76510466a7fbbd9a7.jpg

 

 

This is how I see people grabbing them in the grocery stores and farmers markts. So they will ripen on their own once brought home? They seemed kinda boring  to me when I tasted.in the pictured state. 

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2 hours ago, teonzo said:

 

I'm curious about the maturation point of jujubes.
Jujube trees were imported here in Veneto about 1 century ago. They became pretty popular, almost every home had a jujube tree. This only in a part of Veneto (Venice, Padua and Treviso), they are almost unknown in the rest of Italy. Then in the last few decades they went out of fashion, now they are considered a "forgotten fruit". I have a tree at home, I've been taught to eat them when they just turn fully brown and are still plump, when they taste more like apples than dates, because "when they wilt they are bad". But from what I see people in China eat them when they are wilted and taste more like dates and medlars.
So my question is if Chinese people eat them only after they turn wilted, or if they do just like here and eat them when they are still plump.
Next year I need to remember to let some of them wilt on the tree and make some experiments.

 

 

 

Teo

 

Many, many thanks for this.   


eGullet member #80.

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On 11/12/2019 at 9:21 PM, Margaret Pilgrim said:

I see these in local markets, more fresh than these at this time, but i have no idea how to use them.   Help???

 

Oh the absolute horrid memories I have as a kid “helping” my mom pick these (we picked - she chatted 😂) - taking bushels and bushels of these home and drying them - turn them over - bring them in - take them out - dry - turn - in - out - etc ad nauseam ... on the plus side - she would make a beautiful and delicious rice cake (my favorite) and trade them with her friends for various delicious foods 😂😂😂 - mostly things that were a pita to make ... so - rice Cake is one idea if you make / eat it ... I also know they all froze a lot of them to use later, but I could t give you specifics on how. 

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I have an EpiPen ... my friend gave it to me when he was dying ... it seemed very important to him that I have it ... 

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Picked this morning.    The Hicheyas were hiding among the similarly colored leaves.    They "weren't there" 10 days ago     Somehow the birds missed them also!  

772229976_ScreenShot2019-11-19at8_50_44AM.thumb.png.6a56b0ec01a0a9515ea9f4921cf73563.png

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48 minutes ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

Picked this morning.    The Hicheyas were hiding among the similarly colored leaves.    They "weren't there" 10 days ago     Somehow the birds missed them also!  

 Clearly you  have no possum  and raccoon issues - mine  always disappear...magically overnght! 

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We have raccoon skat but never have seen one and they seem to leave produce alone.    Now in town, that's a different matter.   They ate most of the crop of our apple tree, and what they missed, rats ate.    They also dredge the lawn for grubs, making it look like a mine field.


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Actually the skunks do that as well - the lawn mining   


Edited by heidih (log)
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An unexpected gift. 烟台苹果  (yān tái píng guǒ), Yantai apples.

 

Yantai is a city in Shangdong Province in northern China and is famous for its apples, widely regarded as China's best. A friend's family has orchards there and she sent me a dozen, very seasonal, just picked examples to try. Here are just four. They are huge and very good!

 

22873946_Yantaiapples.thumb.jpg.406a708774f90af30fe8d1bb7b92cf54.jpg

 

 

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@liuzhou  Those look wonderful.  Strawberries are my favourite fruit.  I'm salivating sitting here watching the snow fall.

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Those strawberries sure aren't Driscoll brand ones.   I had almost forgotten that real ones are red from top to bottom.  Bet they aren't hollow in the center either.  Damn, I want some now!  Beautiful.

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2 minutes ago, IowaDee said:

Those strawberries sure aren't Driscoll brand ones.   I had almost forgotten that real ones are red from top to bottom.  Bet they aren't hollow in the center either.  Damn, I want some now!  Beautiful.

 

Driscoll markets in China!  

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Oh I know, they're everywhere.  Maybe China gets the cream of the crop?  

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35 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

 

Minimally. Those definitely weren't Dricoll's.

 

I get it - just spewed about the far far reach of the brand. I only buy from local farmers and our season starts March (non greenhouse). If I can't smell them from 10 feet away - no way. From my eG blog  

 

post-52659-0-53686700-1304279399.jpg

 

 


Edited by heidih (log)
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