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liuzhou

Fruit

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Posted (edited)

Monkfruit, Siraitia grosvenorii , in Chinese 罗汉果 / 羅漢果 (Mandarin: luó hàn guǒ; Cantonese: lo4 hon3 gwo2), is said to be 300* times sweeter than sugar and is used industrially in making "artificial" sweeteners. Round these parts, they are usualy sold dried and used in Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) to treat cold symptoms and sore throats, by  being used to make a kind of herbal tea or soup.

 

1789156699_Monkfruit.thumb.jpg.3921613f8a8b6804ca49ae9aa889180e.jpg

Dried Monkfruit

 

However, we do sometimes get them fresh when they are in season, which is now.

 

510697661_Freshmonkfruit.thumb.jpg.90e26739019c3eb6e5394d7bd32981e8.jpg

 

I have to say, I don't really like them. Too sweet with a bitter aftertaste. So far as I can see, most poeple just dry them themselves anyway!

 

The fresh ones are another thing I've never seen in supermarkets or even markets, but usually being sold by street vendors. Must ask why.

 

* Edited to add this is coincidentally the 300th post in this topic. Just noticed.


Edited by liuzhou (log)
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"HOT" mangosteens: spicy hot, recently-heated hot, or very-popular-at-least-they-want-you-to-think-so hot? (I assume they aren't stolen-hot. :D )

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7 minutes ago, Smithy said:

"HOT" mangosteens: spicy hot, recently-heated hot, or very-popular-at-least-they-want-you-to-think-so hot? (I assume they aren't stolen-hot. :D )

 

I wondered the same when I first came to China and saw these "HOT"signs. First time I recall was on a menu, so I assumed "spicy"", but sadly it just means popular, which they rightfully are. Wonderful fruit!

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This morning these were in the stores again. In Chinese they are called 雪莲果 (xuě lián guǒ), which literally translates as 'snow lotus fruit'. They are Smallanthus sonchifolius or Peruvian ground apples. In Spanish, yacón. The reason they look like root vegetables is because that is what they are! They are just a sweet variety and are eaten like a fruit, despite being the roots of a daisy-like plant. They are OK, but  I wouldn't miss them if they never showed up again.

 

393266036_20190908_1153041.thumb.jpg.5d3955b504fb7550dc9d17e2583bf99d.jpg

 

The larger one in the centre was around 11 inches in length.


Edited by liuzhou (log)
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I saw these in a local NYC supermarket today:

20191006_144524_HDR.thumb.jpg.14b2927158b13ac3dcde106ed45d5863.jpg

 

I didn't buy any - not only were they tiny (much smaller than I've seen anywhere in Asia) but they were hard as rocks... Never a good sign.

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Posted (edited)

A good lesson in "buy fresh & local".  I love ice cold lychee as an example but often that juice squirting goodness is long gone. Gotta be super vigilant.


Edited by heidih (log)

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23 minutes ago, heidih said:

A good lesson in "buy fresh & local".  I love ice cold lychee as an example but often that juice squirting goodness is long gone. Gotta be super vigilant.

 

That's usually a good thing to follow, but mangosteens are tropical fruit, which would never be local to NY.  If they looked even moderately in the range of decent, I would have sampled a few as a test, but I could tell these would be terrible, no purchase required.  I feel bad for people who have never tried a good one  who are curious to try it, spend $10 per pound only to have them be lousy.

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5 minutes ago, KennethT said:

That's usually a good thing to follow, but mangosteens are tropical fruit, which would never be local to NY.  If they looked even moderately in the range of decent, I would have sampled a few as a test, but I could tell these would be terrible, no purchase required.  I feel bad for people who have never tried a good one  who are curious to try it, spend $10 per pound only to have them be lousy.

 

I agree - often see it with those seduced by dragon fruit. NO taste at a huge expense. Jackfruit though has become quite good both taste and price wise in LA. 

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1 hour ago, heidih said:

 

I agree - often see it with those seduced by dragon fruit. NO taste at a huge expense. Jackfruit though has become quite good both taste and price wise in LA. 

To be honest, even having dragon fruit where it is grown locally, it doesn't really have any taste.  But, it should be very juicy and refreshing.  In Vietnam, they commonly make a paste out of salt, lime juice and chili

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@KennethT

 

$10 UDS /lb  for mangosteen....That's nuts.

 

That is $13/lb CDN, and over 2x what I pay (90 minute flight North of you)!

 

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27 minutes ago, TicTac said:

@KennethT

 

$10 UDS /lb  for mangosteen....That's nuts.

 

That is $13/lb CDN, and over 2x what I pay (90 minute flight North of you)!

 

Yep. Forget about the last time I got them (in Indonesia) it was less than $1 per kilo!  At the $10/lb I would get a couple and savor them if they were really high quality, but that price for terrible quality is just crazy.  I imagine that the fruit buyer for the supermarket has never had the real deal before and had no idea what he was buying, but figured that it's a luxury item that would sell in NYC that they could make a log of $ on.

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On 9/7/2019 at 10:02 PM, liuzhou said:

This morning these were in the stores again. In Chinese they are called 雪莲果 (xuě lián guǒ), which literally translates as 'snow lotus fruit'. They are Smallanthus sonchifolius or Peruvian ground apples. In Spanish, yacón. The reason they look like root vegetables is because that is what they are! They are just a sweet variety and are eaten like a fruit, despite being the roots of a daisy-like plant. They are OK, but  I wouldn't miss them if they never showed up again.

 

393266036_20190908_1153041.thumb.jpg.5d3955b504fb7550dc9d17e2583bf99d.jpg

 

The larger one in the centre was around 11 inches in length.

 

I grew Yacon  for three years, 2005, '06 and '07.  I originally bought 5 "live" plants - 4 survived the shipping.  I planted all four in a 3' x 8' x 30" deep stock tank.  Each plant produced 10 to 18 tubers.  I ignored the instructions that came with the plants and left them in the ground over the winter with a couple of tubers left on each. I mulched them deeply and tented them with clear heavy garden plastic staked down to protect them during hard freezes. The tops looked dead but when it warmed in the spring, they greened up and the tubers I had left sprouted.  

I enjoyed them - I had advice from a person who had lived in Peru and told me they grow at an even higher altitude than here and could survive a hard freeze. Also told me to treat them like the white sweet potatoes.  They were excellent sliced thin and deep fried, sliced and baked with sliced apples and oranges - and lots of butter!  I eventually had a dozen plants.  In 2008 I had some problems and wasn't able to do the garden work and the young man who had been doing the heavy work moved to Utah and I had no affordable help and they died.  I certainly got my money's worth. The plants were expensive but produced well and the first crop was more than enough to satisfy me.

 

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