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chromedome

chromedome

On 3/5/2024 at 2:28 AM, liuzhou said:

I have come across a very local fruit. So local in fact that it has no English name that I've been able to find. The botanists are so excited they have given it the catchy name Campanumoea Lancifolia (Roxb.) Merr. [Campanula Lancefolia Roxb.] and a back up name Cyclotron lancifolius, and that's it apart from the Chinese name, Simp: 红果参; Trad:  紅果參(hóng guǒ shēn) which literally translates as 'red fruit ginseng' , although it is unrelated to ginseng.

 

IMG_20240305_141809_edit_449792277198033.thumb.jpg.9b93fda5d76636a1162b21f7aa4556e7.jpg

 

There is very little information on the website about this fruit in English, other than it is cultivated in southwest China. Guess where I am! The Chinese articles aren't much more enlightening.

 

About 2.5 cm / one inch in diameter they have the texture of a particularly juicy apple and taste like a cross between a sweet pear and apple. Quite pleasant.

 

Inside, they look like this.

 

IMG_20240305_141915_edit_449844750246463.thumb.jpg.b36ac3e70dec527aabbac4f5d4beb85b.jpg

 

 

Very cool.

 

Apparently it's part of the broader magnolia family (as are nutmeg and cinnamon, so I've already learned a few new things today). One blogger seems to call it "spider berry," but that appears to be an ad hoc name that nobody else uses or acknowledges.

 

(ETA: Liuzhou doubtless knows the above already, but I thought maybe it saves someone else a click or two on Google...)

chromedome

chromedome

On 3/5/2024 at 2:28 AM, liuzhou said:

I have come across a very local fruit. So local in fact that it has no English name that I've been able to find. The botanists are so excited they have given it the catchy name Campanumoea Lancifolia (Roxb.) Merr. [Campanula Lancefolia Roxb.] and a back up name Cyclotron lancifolius, and that's it apart from the Chinese name, Simp: 红果参; Trad:  紅果參(hóng guǒ shēn) which literally translates as 'red fruit ginseng' , although it is unrelated to ginseng.

 

IMG_20240305_141809_edit_449792277198033.thumb.jpg.9b93fda5d76636a1162b21f7aa4556e7.jpg

 

There is very little information on the website about this fruit in English, other than it is cultivated in southwest China. Guess where I am! The Chinese articles aren't much more enlightening.

 

About 2.5 cm / one inch in diameter they have the texture of a particularly juicy apple and taste like a cross between a sweet pear and apple. Quite pleasant.

 

Inside, they look like this.

 

IMG_20240305_141915_edit_449844750246463.thumb.jpg.b36ac3e70dec527aabbac4f5d4beb85b.jpg

 

 

Very cool.

 

Apparently it's part of the broader magnolia family (as are nutmeg and cinnamon, so I've already learned a few new things today). One blogger seems to call it "spider berry," but that appears to be an ad hoc name that nobody else uses or acknowledges.

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