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Kim Shook

The Ladies Who Lunch (Part 3)

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17 minutes ago, Anna N said:

Well aside from the fact that the noodles got short shrift from me given that I was just trying to remain alive, I found them very disappointing. Think soggy pasta. But I have absolutely nothing to compare them with in terms of what are good versions. 
 

 

 

The noodles are usually served after the diners have eaten the chicken and spuds, to soak up the spicy* juices. They are meant to be "soggy".

 

* The spiciness is believed to be because the inventor of the dish was from Sichuan, but for whatever reason relocated to Xinjiang, but took with him his favourite spices - chilli and Sichuan peppercorns. Who knows, but the dish does feature both, neither of which are indigenous to that area.

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During my (extremely brief) time in China and SE Asia in general, I'd agree that I never noticed any splintered bones - even though it was quite common to find a leg piece (for example) cut crosswise into 2-3 pieces.  I think my local NYC places, no matter how "authentic," have extremely blunt cleavers...

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1 hour ago, KennethT said:

During my (extremely brief) time in China and SE Asia in general, I'd agree that I never noticed any splintered bones - even though it was quite common to find a leg piece (for example) cut crosswise into 2-3 pieces.  I think my local NYC places, no matter how "authentic," have extremely blunt cleavers...

 

 

My lovely chicken vendor lady in the market chops my chicken. Never a splinter.

(But I have to be careful - "chicken lady" in Chinese is also slang for a prostitute, which I'm sure she isn't!)


Edited by liuzhou (log)
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2 hours ago, liuzhou said:

But about your bones!

Thank you so much. 


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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11 hours ago, liuzhou said:

 

The noodles are usually served after the diners have eaten the chicken and spuds, to soak up the spicy* juices. They are meant to be "soggy".

 

* The spiciness is believed to be because the inventor of the dish was from Sichuan, but for whatever reason relocated to Xinjiang, but took with him his favourite spices - chilli and Sichuan peppercorns. Who knows, but the dish does feature both, neither of which are indigenous to that area.

Does the tea from the Xinjiang also contain a bit of sichuan pepper?

 

 

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When I was in a very popular Xinjiang restaurant in Beijing, they had a lot of herbal/flower teas.  We had a really nice rose tea.

Edit: not that that is necessarily indicative of what is true to the area itself... but the restaurant was highly regarded


Edited by KennethT (log)

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Today I was "the lady who lunches," at a new-to-me establishment in Memphis called Puck Food Hall. I went there because one of its vendors is City Block Salumeria, where I went in search of Toulouse sausage; alas, they had none. But there was a vegan place called Revelation that offered Buddha bowls, stuffed potatoes and so forth.

 

I had a stuffed sweet potato whose stuffing was quinoa, black beans, corn  (sorry, @liuzhou!) and tomato, some sort of viniagrette with a bit of a kick to it, and finely chopped kale. I'm not normally a big kale fan, but this was good. I couldn't see how the combo of flavors would work, but...it did. It worked well enough, in fact, that I forgot about taking a photo until I was halfway through it, and at that point it wasn't nearly as attractive.

 

As for the Toulouse sausage -- perusing recipes, it appears it would not be horribly difficult to make, save the fact I do not possess a sausage stuffer.  I'm wondering how it'd do if I just made link-shaped "meatballs" and chilled them until they were firm, and then just placed them in the cassoulet as though they were cased sausages?

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Don't ask. Eat it.

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After an appointment yesterday my daughter and I decided to grab a bite to eat at Pintoh.

 

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Glass of Riesling for me. 
 

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Fresh salad rolls with peanut dipping sauce. I also asked for the mint dipping sauce. It was quite delicious and  packed quite a punch..

 


 

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Tom Yum soup for me. 
 

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I also had duck laarb. 
 

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Daughter had  Gang Ped. 


Edited by Anna N Typos (log)
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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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@Anna N Wow - the serving dishes alone would have made me happy. The first image - I need the glass - forget the drink. Duck laarb sounds like a plan once it gets above 45F here. My Chinese market sells legs by the piece. On the long but for sure list. 

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