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Kim Shook

The Ladies Who Lunch (Part 3)

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29 minutes ago, caroled said:

That cheese looks like someone was trying to warm it in their hands before presentation!, the other components look pretty tasty.  I've been craving Green Goddess dressing for a while now. Must get the stuff to make some.  

OK I will admit to my complete ignorance. I have never eaten green goddess dressing. Except for the stuff they put on these fries which wasn’t a bit green. Is it green?

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15 minutes ago, Anna N said:

OK I will admit to my complete ignorance. I have never eaten green goddess dressing. Except for the stuff they put on these fries which wasn’t a bit green. Is it green?

Yes, yes it is......

Read my recipe in the proper forum.  I love it more than the blue cheese dressing I make .  It is tart from the tarragon vinegar and grassy from the herbs.  Recently I like to pair it with fruit - apples, pears, grapes - in a lettuce salad.  

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I think Green Goddess dressing appears more "green" when finely blended. Otherwise it is just a herby creamy dressing. 

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5 hours ago, heidih said:

I think Green Goddess dressing appears more "green" when finely blended. Otherwise it is just a herby creamy dressing. 

 

Don't forget the anchovy.

 

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On ‎3‎/‎30‎/‎2019 at 5:10 PM, Anna N said:

OK I will admit to my complete ignorance. I have never eaten green goddess dressing. Except for the stuff they put on these fries which wasn’t a bit green. Is it green?

Typically it is greener, but with everyone and their cousin making and posting a version of it on Pinterest, it seems to be morphing into a glorified ranch dressing.  Epicurious has a buttermilk version that is much like I make and remember from my childhood, but they also have one that uses a large quantity of watercress and is full on pea puree green.

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The NYT has a pretty good recipe for Green Goddess. Along with parsley, anchovy and tarragon it calls for watercress and chives and home made mayo if you can swing it. Very green. Older recipes often include sour cream. Once you start adding buttermilk and dry herbs and a fistful of salt it starts getting ranchy. Then there are those rogues who try to sneak in avocado. I say, let them eat toast.

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9 hours ago, Katie Meadow said:

Then there are those rogues who try to sneak in avocado. I say, let them eat toast.

 

I guess that would be me.  I recently made the Greenest Goddess Dressing/Dip from Tartine All Day. Recipe available online here. I used homemade aïoli and sour cream. I and my friends thought it was delicious as a dip with some citrus arancini and raw vegetables (previously shared here over in the avocado cook-off.)  

We did not try it on toast 🙃 but it would be great on a chicken sandwich, for sure.

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17 minutes ago, blue_dolphin said:

 

I guess that would be me.  I recently made the Greenest Goddess Dressing/Dip from Tartine All Day. Recipe available online here. I used homemade aïoli and sour cream. I and my friends thought it was delicious as a dip with some citrus arancini and raw vegetables (previously shared here over in the avocado cook-off.)  

We did not try it on toast 🙃 but it would be great on a chicken sandwich, for sure.

As a Californian, you have special dispensation - nay, a moral obligation! - to incorporate avocado wherever possible, whether appropriate by outsiders' standards or not. :P

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 It is beginning to sound very much like an Alice in Wonderland dressing.  It is whatever one wants it to be!   Thanks for all the input.  

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Posted (edited)

 Today, @Kerry Beal  and I headed out to North York in search of a Japanese dollar store, Oomomo.  Since it was on the way past Goûter, member @Alleguede‘s lovely Patisserie,  and since we knew it was his birthday today, we stopped in with our best wishes. I left with one of his incredible kouign amanns.  Sorry, I should have taken a photograph but where it is now would belong in a medical text,  not here.

 

 We found the Japanese dollar store and I have posted about it and its own newly created topic.

 

 But after out wander through this Crystal Palace-sized emporium we were surely ready for some sustenance. 

 

Within a three minute walk of the store, Memories of Japan , called out as having possibilities. It might better have been named Faded Memories of Japan since in certain ways it was hardly reminiscent of Japan. And yet we enjoyed our food. 

 

The first clue that perhaps we were not in the most capableof hands was noted by Kerry. Our server, though pleasant enough, found it challenging when we didn’t order by number as it were.  I don’t know about you but number 10 and number 19 don’t sound  nearly as appetizing as Beef Sashimi and  Mixed Tempura.  Ultimately  ordering by number seemed likely to be the most efficient way to make sure that our order was transmitted to the kitchen correctly.  I am sure there is a perfectly valid reason for the numbering of dishes on the menu, I just think the staff should also know the dishes by name.  But that’s just being ornery I guess. 

 

 Once again we decided to share a few appetizers. 

 

180F8AB8-7EA1-474D-8610-E4AE79944CE2.thumb.jpeg.7c3d2ce3c4113a81d65e7e193251858e.jpeg

Tea for Kerry, as usual.  Sake for me.

 

8A0116EE-F98D-4109-897B-9A9DA888DA0B.thumb.jpeg.097c0082b4fc2f8388c6d8f0d896ccc7.jpeg

 

Beef sashimi. And this is where you know that their memories of Japan are rather badly faded. The beef was tender and its accompanying sauce tasty but the beef rests on a bed of thickly sliced onion.  In the dimly lit restaurant, I thought it was a bed of iceberg lettuce. Not until I took rather a generous portion did I discover it was onion.  I am quite a fan of onion but I do think it should’ve been finely chopped and treated so that some of the sulphurous notes were muted.

 

F79A983C-1639-4E99-B863-938516FA9532.thumb.jpeg.c46df66659398a5aaf373219ee414e14.jpeg

 

 Mixed tempura in the foreground and pork tonkatsu in the rear. 

 

C566DBE6-ABEC-492A-9D0A-B777F91B4F67.thumb.jpeg.4481c60e3e9251ac3f92ce02c3e9ca3b.jpeg

 

The fried calamari was very tender but again the presentation is very  un-Japanese. 

 

 All in all it was a pleasant lunch and we did get to do some people watching.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Edited by Anna N Numerous spelling and grammar errors. (log)
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Posted (edited)

@Kerry Bealand I returned to Celadon House today since we were in the vicinity and knew we had enjoyed our meals there previously. 

 

 We started with ginger tea for Kerry and a glass of water for me. I regret that there are no photographs, not that you don’t know what these two things look like, but the water glass was very attractive.   I meant to share it. 

 

A4CE7188-C0AB-48FF-9A3B-C6A8C406D98B.thumb.jpeg.efaab04e65635648017d82fccf1c3aaf.jpeg

 

 Spicy calamari with their very addictive vinegar-based dip. 

 

CD24294A-EB8E-4A44-A112-05E7AB9C6639.thumb.jpeg.7dc23b9517958478c2d9228166e5599a.jpeg

 

 

Four Season Beans. Twice cooked green beans with ground pork and chilies. 

 

54735032-017E-4134-9C2B-446B3DB55877.thumb.jpeg.c4f6f54e1f34ad543350c76fddc528f7.jpeg

 

For me this was a to-die-for dish.  Garlic Mushroom Gambas.   Button mushrooms and Spanish onions with garlic and chilies.  There is no way that you can prepare mushrooms that I won’t like them but this might be my new favourite.  

 

E7997B5B-330B-4CFC-A606-F06560DC5F84.thumb.jpeg.30ad5e3667660b370741c17f2ddde8ec.jpeg

 

 Coconut chicken and rice for the table.

 

The dishes at this restaurant are unique. None of them come from the freezer and none of them are reheated in the microwave.  It is a nice change from some of the Asian restaurants where every dish tastes the same no matter which restaurant you choose.  

 

 We were able to look back at the meals that we had posted from Celadon House and choose dishes we had never tasted before. Another reason to love this forum. 

 

 

 

E23F3B6D-3317-4B29-84D2-B51606A8DD63.jpeg


Edited by Anna N (log)
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Posted (edited)

I joined 2 ladies for lunch today at the Lakeside Restaurant  in Encino where we have dined (lunched?) before. They have a very pleasant, tree-shaded outdoor eating area that’s immediately adjacent to the Los Encinos State Historic Park. 

Shrimp tacos for me

D33844A8-B73E-403B-BC62-EFFC54574B53.thumb.jpeg.3353def560ae98f7c36e0368f3c6a526.jpeg

 

Salmon salad for both the other ladies

41B8BC7B-847D-414C-A1E7-195F60DDAA63.thumb.jpeg.05ee6b0d3fa12b1bfa8b2abb69e587c5.jpeg

 


Edited by blue_dolphin (log)
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 Fasten your seat belt. It’s another adventure for @Kerry Beal and me.

 

 

Today Kerry had some business to conduct in Brampton so last night I researched restaurants in and around Brampton. They largely fall into two categories— Indian and Italian. 

But here’s the thing – – both of us have a penchant for considering Indian food appropriate only in winter and Italian food only when it’s exceptionally good. 

 

As we searched for the address where Kerry was to conduct her business we caught a glimpse of a restaurant called Ann’s Grove. I did a quick Google search and learned that It was a small family-run Caribbean place. 

 

It looked far more interesting than any of the places I had unearthed.  

 

Ann’s Grove was compact but not crammed. It’s bar however was both compact and crammed, mostly with rums, as Kerry noted. But then what should one expect in a Caribbean restaurant? I tell you this just for a little atmosphere.

 

We had barely sat down when Ann herself came over to welcome us and proudly told us that she was the chef and owner and pretty much general factotum. A slight man, who seemed as if he wished to disappear inside of himself, whom we later learned was Ann’s husband, was bussing and waiting tables. 

 

There were no menus but Ann was asking us if we fancied chicken or goat or …. This was a little bit disconcerting.  Without a good grasp of what a Caribbean restaurant might offer, we found ourselves hard-pressed to make any decisions.  But Kerry could read the offerings on the wall above the counter and we settled on oxtails with rice and peas (I forgot that peas really means beans!) and a chicken roti. We would share both dishes.

 

FAD3A069-294D-4323-AD33-70C62AD6A9DD.thumb.jpeg.c64fc28031e5419eacf8585bb361dbc2.jpeg

 

 Another restaurant offering a box of tissues rather than napkins/serviettes. 

 

8C94BC32-15C2-4EB7-BF8E-940B4CF4B162.thumb.jpeg.6ae9c99dd60bde2275e92b126abd57a9.jpeg

 

 Oxtails with rice and beans. Honesty is the best policy. Peas are green. 

 

F4ED95F1-9BDA-435C-8266-CFBD70985F8B.thumb.jpeg.61715f92cbe11ff76a72352179bc46e9.jpeg

 Chicken roti.

 

Ann also suggested drinks. Kerry ordered a guava soda and I had a mauby soda.

9CC191D2-8C45-409D-8CCA-BA9AC2493CA6.thumb.jpeg.bc994c5f739337004e3c1a586348548c.jpeg

 

I had no idea what mauby was but I was feeling adventuresome. Not until I got home and was able to do some research did I learn that it is made from the bark of the mauby tree. Claimed by some to have diuretic properties and by others to cause diarrhoea the first time one ingests it, I was no longer feeling quite so blasé about my drink choice.  

 

So far, so good.  Thanks for asking.

 

Towards the end of our meal, the phone in the restaurant rang followed immediately by loud wails of anguish from Ann. 

When she had more or less regained her composure Ann came over to our table to apologize for the commotion.  Between her accent and her obvious distress, piecing the story together proved challenging.

 

Someone had died.  We got that part. That the said someone lived in Barbados and had recently been put into a home, we got. Beyond that, it was anybody’s guess.

As near as we were able to interpret, Ann’s father-in-law had died. And she was the target of some feuding family because she had opposed putting a 79-year-old Jesuit priest into a home. And now see what had happened. If he hadn’t been put in the home he wouldn’t have died. At least that was the way Ann seemed to see the situation.

 

Do you see our difficulty in untangling this version of the story? 

 

Either they do things VERY differently on the Islands or he wasn’t a priest, or he wasn’t a Jesuit, or he wasn’t a father.  Or he was a father but the spiritual kind. That explanation could not account for the claim that he was her husband‘s father and her father-in-law. 

 

I am quite sure a logical explanation exists that could dispel our confusion. But interrogating one who is grieving and so recently bereaved is not considered polite anywhere. So we offered Ann our sympathy, reassured her once again that we were not in the least upset, and left in possession of a riddle we may never solve and a doggy bag of delicious Caribbean food. 

  

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Anna N said:

 Fasten your seat belt. It’s another adventure for @Kerry Beal and me. ...

I am quite sure a logical explanation exists that could dispel our confusion. But interrogating one who is grieving and so recently bereaved is not considered polite anywhere. So we offered Ann our sympathy, reassured her once again that we were not in the least upset, and left in possession of a riddle we may never solve and a doggy bag of delicious Caribbean food. 

  

“Liked” and “Confused”, since we’re only allowed one reaction per post. The mystery lives on.


Edited by DesertTinker Spelling (log)
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 Two lunches in a row but only one adventure per week.

 

Today @Kerry Beal and I returned to an old favourite, Hakka Fresh

 

We shared:

AA9C0F2D-EBB9-4167-8950-AA1B55866A4D.thumb.jpeg.d4bb3f5d8aa416ef8633f925a68b1b10.jpeg

 

 The deep fried cauliflower. 

 

EB465F51-2680-4A18-A555-C60534048419.thumb.jpeg.5d2b1d11113c9d4fa9d00f10ac97e07e.jpeg

 Chicken Karachi.

 16F03A84-EAAF-43C4-8807-B2F42452A959.thumb.jpeg.b3151b6ad21d2a430ffb6850ab00f3e8.jpeg

 

 Deluxe special Chow Mein. 

 

F9936B72-7BD7-49E3-8154-16ACFCD51AD3.thumb.jpeg.5db93a2e5ba1efbbb4a2427ce58c32b1.jpeg

 

 And of course some rice.

 

We decided that water was just fine today so no questionable drinks. At least we hope not. 

 

 It was all good. Kerry put the cauliflower at #1 and the chow mein at #2. I was like Buridan’s ass, unable to choose. But  whatever way you slice it, I was the one to take the doggy bag home. 

 

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18 hours ago, Anna N said:

 Fasten your seat belt. It’s another adventure for @Kerry Beal and me.

 

 

Today Kerry had some business to conduct in Brampton so last night I researched restaurants in and around Brampton. They largely fall into two categories— Indian and Italian. 

But here’s the thing – – both of us have a penchant for considering Indian food appropriate only in winter and Italian food only when it’s exceptionally good. 

 

As we searched for the address where Kerry was to conduct her business we caught a glimpse of a restaurant called Ann’s Grove. I did a quick Google search and learned that It was a small family-run Caribbean place. 

 

It looked far more interesting than any of the places I had unearthed.  

 

Ann’s Grove was compact but not crammed. It’s bar however was both compact and crammed, mostly with rums, as Kerry noted. But then what should one expect in a Caribbean restaurant? I tell you this just for a little atmosphere.

 

We had barely sat down when Ann herself came over to welcome us and proudly told us that she was the chef and owner and pretty much general factotum. A slight man, who seemed as if he wished to disappear inside of himself, whom we later learned was Ann’s husband, was bussing and waiting tables. 

 

There were no menus but Ann was asking us if we fancied chicken or goat or …. This was a little bit disconcerting.  Without a good grasp of what a Caribbean restaurant might offer, we found ourselves hard-pressed to make any decisions.  But Kerry could read the offerings on the wall above the counter and we settled on oxtails with rice and peas (I forgot that peas really means beans!) and a chicken roti. We would share both dishes.

 

FAD3A069-294D-4323-AD33-70C62AD6A9DD.thumb.jpeg.c64fc28031e5419eacf8585bb361dbc2.jpeg

 

 Another restaurant offering a box of tissues rather than napkins/serviettes. 

 

8C94BC32-15C2-4EB7-BF8E-940B4CF4B162.thumb.jpeg.6ae9c99dd60bde2275e92b126abd57a9.jpeg

 

 Oxtails with rice and beans. Honesty is the best policy. Peas are green. 

 

F4ED95F1-9BDA-435C-8266-CFBD70985F8B.thumb.jpeg.61715f92cbe11ff76a72352179bc46e9.jpeg

 Chicken roti.

 

Ann also suggested drinks. Kerry ordered a guava soda and I had a mauby soda.

9CC191D2-8C45-409D-8CCA-BA9AC2493CA6.thumb.jpeg.bc994c5f739337004e3c1a586348548c.jpeg

 

I had no idea what mauby was but I was feeling adventuresome. Not until I got home and was able to do some research did I learn that it is made from the bark of the mauby tree. Claimed by some to have diuretic properties and by others to cause diarrhoea the first time one ingests it, I was no longer feeling quite so blasé about my drink choice.  

 

So far, so good.  Thanks for asking.

 

Towards the end of our meal, the phone in the restaurant rang followed immediately by loud wails of anguish from Ann. 

When she had more or less regained her composure Ann came over to our table to apologize for the commotion.  Between her accent and her obvious distress, piecing the story together proved challenging.

 

Someone had died.  We got that part. That the said someone lived in Barbados and had recently been put into a home, we got. Beyond that, it was anybody’s guess.

As near as we were able to interpret, Ann’s father-in-law had died. And she was the target of some feuding family because she had opposed putting a 79-year-old Jesuit priest into a home. And now see what had happened. If he hadn’t been put in the home he wouldn’t have died. At least that was the way Ann seemed to see the situation.

 

Do you see our difficulty in untangling this version of the story? 

 

Either they do things VERY differently on the Islands or he wasn’t a priest, or he wasn’t a Jesuit, or he wasn’t a father.  Or he was a father but the spiritual kind. That explanation could not account for the claim that he was her husband‘s father and her father-in-law. 

 

I am quite sure a logical explanation exists that could dispel our confusion. But interrogating one who is grieving and so recently bereaved is not considered polite anywhere. So we offered Ann our sympathy, reassured her once again that we were not in the least upset, and left in possession of a riddle we may never solve and a doggy bag of delicious Caribbean food. 

  

 

Not exactly your everyday lunch! Glad the food was good. 

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