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blue_dolphin

Lunch! What'd ya have? (2017)

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On 10/3/2017 at 9:13 PM, HungryChris said:

I enjoy the stadium brats as well. This was labeled as a "seasonal item".

HC

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Aldi in Germany sells the same ones ... I wish they'd open a store in Hong Kong!

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If it would ever get cold, I'd make posole. I still have, and use regularly, @Chris Amirault's mother-in-law's recipe, for which I have been grateful for several years now. Only posole I've ever made. See no need to try to improve on Sweet-Baby-Jesus-that's-good!

 

For some reason, I have a tendency to hit some weird filter on my phone that gives me this sort of greenish sepia tone photo. Sunday lunch was sirloin tips in onion gravy (with rosemary and marjoram) over mashed potatoes, with a side of purple-hulled peas topped with tomato relish. Definitely better than the photo looks.

 

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I have taken to adding a sizeable spoonful of my homemade Greek yogurt into mashed potatoes. Does good things for them. Butter, and a small splash of heavy cream. Yum.

 

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More leftovers from last night’s dinner.

 

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Today a roadside plate of fried rice, somewhere in south China.

 

Fried rice is most usually eaten as a quick lunch or snack, rather than to accompany other dishes as it often is in western Chinese restaurants. This was advertised as 扬州炒饭  yáng zhōu chǎo fàn, but it isn't really. Real Yanggzhou Fried Rice is a much more luxurious version.

 

Note the lack of egg. Fried rice in China sometimes has egg, but usually not.

 

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Anyway, It was fine and at ¥7 (USD $1; £0.70) a large plate, who can complain?

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 Missed breakfast due to an early appointment and came home quite ravenous after a wild cab ride with a driver who, even with the help of a GPS, couldn’t find a well-known and well-established medical clinic.  I really needed a stiff drink but thought it better to eat first.

 

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Now I’m ready for the drink. 

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IMG_0178.thumb.JPG.fc23b6682223b9c8d6765d7cebcc07a5.JPGBone marrow on toast.   I was chatting with another shopper at Whole Foods while we were buying steaks and he mentioned that  butchers at WF will cut and sell shank bone if asked!  Super fresh.  3.99 a pound.  

 

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Lunch last week.  I think it was apparatus/spinach soup with some hummus under a sliced egg topped with Cowboy Candy!  Some Asian celery salad leftovers.

Second picture is from today.  Made some fresh spring rolls to take to a friend's for appetizers but I had to keep testing them!

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1 hour ago, Constantin Peters said:

german schupfnudeln and oven roasted strapatsada. 

lunch_16.10.17.jpg

 

 

 

Please tell us more about these dishes: what's in them?  Do you make them often?

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Schupfnudeln are a kind of german gnocchi, a bit firmer and usually fried, in this case baked. Strapatsada is a greek dish that is basically a tomato sauce with eggs stirred in, often topped with feta, in my case more heavy on bellpepper and topped with crushed hazlenut. No, I have not made this in a while, but it is a good brunch / lunch dish, because it is easily scalable.

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1 hour ago, Smithy said:

 

Please tell us more about these dishes: what's in them?  Do you make them often?

Yes, by all means, please do. I see "German" and my eyes light up.

 

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Just now, kayb said:

Yes, by all means, please do. I see "German" and my eyes light up.

 

 

I just did ;). I you have any more questions, I am happy to answer in more detail.

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So are the schupfelgnuden a potato dumpling of sorts? Or more like spatzele?

 

They look luscious. You had me at the eggs in tomato sauce until you mentioned bell pepper. :S

 

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Like I said, they are more like gnocchi, but usually fried. Think in the direction of french fry more than dumpling. I personally like bell peppers, You don´t have to use them. The most basic version of strapatsada would be to puree fresh tomatoes, cook them down in olive oil for ten to twenty minutes and then stir the eggs in. The rest is up to your taste, the contents of your fridge and how much extra steps you are in the mood of taking.

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Tomato bruschetta, two toasties, one with leftover collard greens spread with roasted garlic and topped with prosciutto panino, one with sliced marinated mushrooms with the same topping. I added a few slices of leftover steak with a horseradish and mayo sauce.

HC

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A collard green toastie. Saints preserve me.

 

Sue me. Can't abide greens, either collard, turnip, or otherwise.

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@kayb, I did look for butterkase cheese at Aldi,  yesterday, inspired by your post, but could not find it at my local store.

Deb asked what the greens where, but did not sample them either. I think she shares your aberration for them. I love them all, collard, turnip, mustard, kale, or broccoli rabe, and cannot get enough of them. I planted broccoli rabe, with great anticipation, but between the leaf eating insects and the deer, it was a lost cause. They seem to know what's good too.

HC


Edited by HungryChris (log)
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Sautéed pork and onions over instant pot cooked polenta

 

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Forgot to give credit to @Anna N.  I used her pot in pot polenta cooking method in IP.  I will never cook polenta any other way again!

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2 minutes ago, chefmd said:

Forgot to give credit to @Anna N.  I used her pot in pot polenta cooking method in IP.  I will never cook polenta any other way again!

 Thank you but I don’t think I really deserve the credit. I’m sure I found it elsewhere else I might’ve extrapolated from something.  I am usually careful to credit my sources but not always. 

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DA3EF2DC-C392-4F3E-A0BF-E5F91E9876D8.thumb.jpeg.51a3c243718d3c77afe8e1cfe6ff82eb.jpeg

 

 Sous vide pork tenderloin with sugar snaps. 

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@Anna N

 

congratulations !

 

Pork

 

w SV

 

will be very tender

 

and no Old Time Worries 

 

e the result

 

Pork

 

at 130.1

 

might be

 

Sooooooo

 

Tasty

 

well, its right there 

 

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31 minutes ago, rotuts said:

Tasty

 Well, @rotuts,  I got to tell you it was not tasty. Not a bit. I could’ve been eating anything.  I truly do not know where the problem lies. Perhaps the pork. Perhaps my taste buds. Perhaps it needs a sauce with a little fat in it to bring out the flavor. It was just flat.  Very, very flat. 

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11 hours ago, Anna N said:

 Well, @rotuts,  I got to tell you it was not tasty. Not a bit. I could’ve been eating anything.  I truly do not know where the problem lies. Perhaps the pork. Perhaps my taste buds. Perhaps it needs a sauce with a little fat in it to bring out the flavor. It was just flat.  Very, very flat. 

Please try dry-curing it for a day or two with pink salt. Gives it a gammon-ny touch and improves the "flat" flavour of non-heritage pork by a mile ...


Edited by Duvel (log)

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