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What Are You Cooking Sous Vide Today? (Part 3)


FrogPrincesse
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2 hours ago, billyhill said:

Meltingly tender but a little less moist than hoped.  Honestly, I think this is a Wamart select grade chuck. With that in mind, the results were awesome.  The reason I went with sous vide was to elevate cheap cuts. This exceeds my expectations. 

Did you brine this (even for an hour or so)?

Trouble is it may add a slightly salty undertaste (is that even a word 🙁) but I started to do this with just about all pork because  it seems to be fairly lean in the muscle itself. Perhaps shortening the time further may be a thing. I have noticed when doing long SV that the meat becomes more and more tender with time until it turns to mush but it also dries out more and more. Reducing the time becomes a tradeoff.

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Be kind first.

Be nice.

(If you don't know the difference then you need to do some research)

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@Bernie 

 

good points 

 

Have not tried brining w beef nor pork

 

I don't think it need it based on temps I use , which arefde lower than most others

 

indeed , w long SV'ds you can get to mush 

 

I think some of this is the quality and age of the mat when you get it.

 

''  it also dries out more and more ''

 

this is more of a temperature thing I think.

 

as you raise the temp of the bath , the muscle fibers contract more , 

 

squeezing out Jus .  less squeeze at lower temps.

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@billyhill 

 

I have never heard of buckboard bacon .

 

goggled and found a few Rx's that look interesting

 

do you break down a whole pork shoulder 

 

into smaller pieces , then cure ?

 

what are the sizes of the three you pic'd ?

 

Id like to hear more about your process and technique.

 

thank you for the inspiration.

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@rotuts

Weights vary from 900 to 1700 grams. I buy whole boston butts and you can break them down as you see fit. With these, I cut the boneless part of the shoulder to cure. Bone in portions get smoked, grilled or deboned and ground. A large portion of what I make goes to my venison pimp as a token of appreciation. 

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@billyhill 

 

thank you for your reply .

 

So , from a whole shoulder 

 

you cut a bones part off 

 

then , do the cure , and get 

 

your Shoulder Bacon ?

 

Im hoping your are 

 

' 'Stocked Up '''

 

please consider   the next time you get 

 

a full Butt 

 

you can take a few pics . 

 

as you work that through .

 

Id love to see that 

 

BTW , I now have a place 

 

to smoke items like this 

 

Lucky Me !

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I started a couple of turkey leg quarters and wing flats with tips at noon.  This will be the first time I have used my Anova for an extended period using an ice chest.   I made a bridge for the Anova out of a 1-inch scrap of PT SYP.  I also used a small piece of shoe mould to clip the bag ends too.  The way the interior of the ice chest is moulded allows the top of bridge to sit flush allowing a nice seal with foil backed insulation lid.   I'll cook for 20 hours then reduce the heat to 140 and cook the breast.

 

IMG_20221203_115553114.thumb.jpg.596c912fd1747875ae3450df40f85361.jpg

 

IMG_20221203_115542610.thumb.jpg.1ff8eb09d7be55458957f2e7e15412e9.jpg

 

IMG_20221203_111830676.thumb.jpg.75ceff445f1e9e1e68c37eb539346373.jpg

IMG_20221203_115553114 (1).jpg

Edited by Steve Irby (log)
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3 minutes ago, billyhill said:

 

@Shelby, I tried the pork loin. I ran a test chop 3 hrs @141F. It was amazing.

 

salt, pepper, a little garlic powder, a sprig of thyme and a pat of butter

 

Do you mean a chop cut from the loin?  Did you sear the chop after sous vide?

 

Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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10 minutes ago, billyhill said:

 

@Shelby, I tried the pork loin. I ran a test chop 3 hrs @141F. It was amazing.

 

salt, pepper, a little garlic powder, a sprig of thyme and a pat of butter

I'm so glad you liked it!  You can't beat pork loin in the SV.

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35 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Do you mean a chop cut from the loin?  Did you sear the chop after sous vide?

 

Yes a boneless chop cut from the loin. Seared in a large cast iron skillet preheated in a 500F oven

 

Now the kids want SV porkchops for dinner. Usually not their favorite.

Edited by billyhill
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34 minutes ago, billyhill said:

 

@Shelby, I tried the pork loin. I ran a test chop 3 hrs @141F. It was amazing.

 

salt, pepper, a little garlic powder, a sprig of thyme and a pat of butter

Some here like their pork a little pinker.  I do mine at 134f for 3 hours.  Turns out super juicy.

 

Another fantastic use of sous vide …beef short ribs at 144F for 48 hours.  Phenomenal.  But you need to get good quality meat.

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9 minutes ago, billyhill said:

My family is still pretty squeamish about pink pork. My wife only ate beef well done till we had be married for years. I'm slowly pushing the boundaries back.

 

I love short ribs.


Take her for a vacation in Germany and have some raw pork … she’ll be cured instantly ☺️

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The turkey fest is coming to an end.  I'd like to thank the two 12-pounders from Publix ($0.49/#) and the 15-pound Butterball from BJ's ($0.99/#) for making it possible.  The Butterball is featured today.

 

Leg quarters cooked for 20 hours @ 150 and breast cooked for 4 hours @138.  The breast halves were seasoned with five spice, pork fat, satsuma slices  and lemon slices.  The leg quarters were seasoned with Tony Chacere's More Spice blend.  The meats were vacuum bagged and allowed to marinate for 24 hours prior to cooking.   The dark meat was finished on the smoker for about two hours.  The breast and drumette were flash fried for color.   The breast with five spice is really tasty and the texture is better than the generic Publix birds.

 

 

IMG_20221204_150418411.thumb.jpg.74bcd837bb580024c882ba34b575c19b.jpg

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20 minutes ago, billyhill said:

I like fennel, but have never tried the pollen. What is it like?

 

Had more chops for dinner. Roasted cauliflower with provolone. Jas.ine rice.

 

Its basically ground up fennel.  In spite of the name I doubt that there's actually much pollen.

 

It adds a fennel note, like a spice.  Nice with pork.

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