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What Are You Cooking Sous Vide Today? (Part 3)


FrogPrincesse
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Posted (edited)

Not "what I've cooked sous vide today" exactly, but what I cooked sous vide that I hope to eat tonight.  I have a bunch of pasteurized chicken thighs in the back of the refrigerator.  I plan to make chicken cacciatore.  If using fresh chicken thighs my first step would be to brown the chicken pieces in a pan with a bit of hot olive oil.

 

When using previously cooked thighs for chicken cacciatore I typically unbag the thighs, wipe them down with paper towels, and then either attempt to brown the pieces in a pan or broil them in the APO.  The pan method is messy but both methods usually lead to an eatable result.  The problem is the browning is never all that great.

 

With that prolog out of the way, what is the best technique for browning the skin on sous vide chicken thighs?  Please don't suggest a torch, an outdoors grill, or Ooni oven.  Thanks.

 

 

Edit:  or a tandoor

 

Edited by JoNorvelleWalker (log)

Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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23 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Not "what I've cooked sous vide today" exactly, but what I cooked sous vide that I hope to eat tonight.  I have a bunch of pasteurized chicken thighs in the back of the refrigerator.  I plan to make chicken cacciatore.  If using fresh chicken thighs my first step would be to brown the chicken pieces in a pan with a bit of hot olive oil.

 

When using previously cooked thighs for chicken cacciatore I typically unbag the thighs, wipe them down with paper towels, and then either attempt to brown the pieces in a pan or broil them in the APO.  The pan method is messy but both methods usually lead to an eatable result.  The problem is the browning is never all that great.

 

With that prolog out of the way, what is the best technique for browning the skin on sous vide chicken thighs?  Please don't suggest a torch, an outdoors grill, or Ooni oven.  Thanks.

 

 

Edit:  or a tandoor

 

 

Broil?

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2 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

 

Broil?

 

Thanks.  As I said, broiling was eatable but not ideal.  Since I posted my question I found this advice from Kenji...

 

https://www.seriouseats.com/crispy-sous-vide-chicken-thigh-recipe

 

I think I'll give his technique a try, even if the final texture won't be that much like a braise.

 

Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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17 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

think I'll give his technique a try, even

I am always interested in technique so I found myself wading through this slurry of verbal diarrhoea in search of something that Kenji does that differs from what I do. After an expenditure of unrecoverable and precious time the only difference I found was that he flattens the sous-vided skin-side-down thigh on the cutting board whereas I do that in the pan. Am I missing some vital step?

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

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Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

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1 hour ago, Anna N said:

I am always interested in technique so I found myself wading through this slurry of verbal diarrhoea in search of something that Kenji does that differs from what I do. After an expenditure of unrecoverable and precious time the only difference I found was that he flattens the sous-vided skin-side-down thigh on the cutting board whereas I do that in the pan. Am I missing some vital step?

 

Probably not.

 

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Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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21 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Not "what I've cooked sous vide today" exactly, but what I cooked sous vide that I hope to eat tonight.  I have a bunch of pasteurized chicken thighs in the back of the refrigerator.  I plan to make chicken cacciatore.  If using fresh chicken thighs my first step would be to brown the chicken pieces in a pan with a bit of hot olive oil.

 

When using previously cooked thighs for chicken cacciatore I typically unbag the thighs, wipe them down with paper towels, and then either attempt to brown the pieces in a pan or broil them in the APO.  The pan method is messy but both methods usually lead to an eatable result.  The problem is the browning is never all that great.

 

With that prolog out of the way, what is the best technique for browning the skin on sous vide chicken thighs?  Please don't suggest a torch, an outdoors grill, or Ooni oven.  Thanks.

 

 

Edit:  or a tandoor

 

How about rubbing a little baking soda on the skin before browning?  

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8 minutes ago, Kim Shook said:

How about rubbing a little baking soda on the skin before browning?  

 

For Maillard?  I would think the pan would get hot enough so that pH is not an issue.  And I worry that baking soda will make food taste funny.  I suspect the reason I have trouble browning sous vide chicken skin is the water that the skin contains.

 

Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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19 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

For Maillard?  I would think the pan would get hot enough so that pH is not an issue.  And I worry that baking soda will make food taste funny.  I suspect the reason I have trouble browning sous vide chicken skin is the water that the skin contains.

 

Well, then, you could take it off and deep fry it and eat it as an appetizer.  😁  I treat all loose skin at a cook's treat.  

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9 hours ago, Anna N said:

I am always interested in technique so I found myself wading through this slurry of verbal diarrhoea in search of something that Kenji does that differs from what I do. After an expenditure of unrecoverable and precious time the only difference I found was that he flattens the sous-vided skin-side-down thigh on the cutting board whereas I do that in the pan. Am I missing some vital step?

 

I am the one who may be missing some vital step:  since the chicken is cooked, how do you get it to lie flat?  Short of a tortilla press.

 

Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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1 hour ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

I am the one who may be missing some vital step:  since the chicken is cooked, how do you get it to lie flat?  Short of a tortilla press.

 

Well if you follow the Kenji link to Voltaggio:

“Have ready a large bowl of ice water. Remove the thighs from the circulating water and place the bag into the ice water for 20 minutes. If serving the chicken that day, place the bag on a baking sheet and refrigerate until ready to sear the thighs. If serving the chicken the next day, place the bag, with the thighs skin side down, on a baking sheet. Place another baking sheet on top and weight it down with a heavy fry pan. Refrigerate overnight.”

 

Failing that I think you are stuck using a spatula to hold the thigh flat against the pan. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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31 minutes ago, Anna N said:

Well if you follow the Kenji link to Voltaggio:

“Have ready a large bowl of ice water. Remove the thighs from the circulating water and place the bag into the ice water for 20 minutes. If serving the chicken that day, place the bag on a baking sheet and refrigerate until ready to sear the thighs. If serving the chicken the next day, place the bag, with the thighs skin side down, on a baking sheet. Place another baking sheet on top and weight it down with a heavy fry pan. Refrigerate overnight.”

 

Failing that I think you are stuck using a spatula to hold the thigh flat against the pan. 

 

I assure you, neither my Lamson Heavy Duty Stiff Turner nor my 2kg Paderno meat pounder would hold this unbagged thigh flat against anything.

Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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Screw Kenji and Voltaggio.  I could not decide between my Scanpan non-stick saute pan and my Berndes non-stick wok.  I grabbed my trusty Williams Sonoma stir fry pan and stir fried sliced mushrooms.  Transferred the mushrooms to a bowl.  Added fresh oil and rosemary to the pan and browned the chicken all over.  Keeping it moving with the wok shovel.  Added vinegar then wine and garlic, and cooked down till the liquid evaporated.  Removed the chicken from the pan, then added water to deglaze and make a sauce.  Returned chicken and mushrooms to the pan for just a moment before serving.

 

I have been making chicken cacciatore almost fifty years, or maybe more.  One of my best ever.  Accompanied by last night's baguette and Boursin.

 

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Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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Some advice please. I have a 2"- 2.25"  lamb shoulder chop cut. I have no idea how long to cook it.

 

@cyalexa did a 3/4" lamb shoulder chop at 140°F for 5 hours.

 

My history with lamb shoulder or leg of lamb is 133°F for 1 to 3 days.

 

 

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Made Massaman curry with some goat "curry pieces" at 60 C for about 30 hours. The sous vide was mainly to get them tender and not too goaty.  I de-boned and took the meaty parts out for a fine dice. Then threw them in with everything else and cooked as normal. The meat ended up pretty good although the yield was low. The dogs should like the scraps that weren't too fatty.

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It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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  • 2 weeks later...

When picking up my beef order I purchased a skirt steak.  I personally, have never seen them in the grocery stores and have no idea as to how to cook it.  I think that due to the thiness of the meay, sous vide would be the way to go.  I saw a bunch of suggested times when I googled for how long to cook it, ranging from 2 1/2 to 24 hours.  For those of you who have cooked skirt steak, what do you do?

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@ElsieD 

 

what a find !

 

to me :

 

in fact 

 

there are two kinds of skirt steak 

 

and each animal  has 2 of each.

 

for me  : there are the thiner one

 

and a bit difficult to get locally 

 

and the thicker version

 

depending what you have :

 

for the thicker:

 

tie into a pinwheel

 

w s bit of seasons of your choice 

 

on the serve .

 

SV  @ a temp that gives you the 'rareness '

 

including a sear if you like.

 

done

 

the thinner is a delicacy 

 

that does well on  very high grilling heat

 

for not to long

 

then cut in half

 

1/2 for each , or two 1/2'ves  for one

 

ie

 

it has to be cut in halter.

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@gfweb 

 

I think there are two skirts. . 2 per side of the cow.

 

the thinner one , is very tender 

 

and Ive only had it at a butcher shop

 

the other is sisal grain , but thinkier

 

Im gussying that the fajita cut  , thus cheaper.

 

each , or if you only get the thiker

 

can be quite delicious 

 

treated differently,

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DH makes a tasty marinade which is sealed in the bag. 130°F for 24 hours. Skirt steak dried off, then broiled for a few moments.

 

Edited to add that the last time we made skirt steak, it was sous vide-d for 48 hours.

Edited by TdeV (log)
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Thanks for your responses.  It seems that the type of steak you have determines how you cook it.  I think I have the smaller, skinnier one.  I'll call tomorrow and ask the seller whether it's an inner or an outer.

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