Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

What Are You Cooking Sous Vide Today? (Part 3)


FrogPrincesse
 Share

Recommended Posts

48 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

 

Ha ha.  What I meant was, does the chicken have any texture or is it mushy?

 

Not mushy.  I have about four bags of pasteurized thighs in the refrigerator at the moment.  Typically I either use them for faux chicken cacciatore or steam bake in the anova, the way I would bake a previously uncooked thigh.

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Okanagancook said:

Ok.  The cookbook did say 2-3 hours so I will check the doneness after 3 hrs.  Thanks.

 

Did you catch it yourself?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The octopus turned out quite tender but definitely has a bit of a chew.  I think my oven method resulted in a more tender octopus.  Next time I will try the oven and compare.  This one was done at 180f for 4 hours, rested on the counter for 30 min, then put in an ice bath for 30 minutes and refrigerated.

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

I think my Anova is on its last legs (leg?). Cooking some pork chops prior to finishing on the grill. I had set the Anova to 135. Temp is cycling up and down between 130 and 140. Ideas? I thought I might try to clean it by circulating some vinegar and water.

  • Sad 2

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
Posted (edited)

@Kim Shook 

 

B.T. , or F. M .

 

is already tender , if properly trimmed .  all that silver skin 

 

if you feel two hours 128 - 130 whon't get the meat warm enough , add another hour

 

it will not hurt the meat .

 

the hot sear will bring the meat to 135 ?    I hope not too much higher

 

pls post pics if you can !

 

enjoy !

Edited by rotuts (log)
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hrs or three hrs will be about the same sousvide you can always return the filet to the water bath after searing (in the same bag )if it’s not warm enough for ya .mr isn’t exactly hot

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

55 minutes ago, rotuts said:

@Kim Shook 

 

if you feel two hours 128 - 130 whon't get the meat warm enough , add another hour

 

 

I'm not worried that bringing to approx. 130 won't be warm enough.  I was wondering if I SV'd, then chilled before searing would it then not be warm enough.  

 

@gilbertlevine - what are the benefits of chilling before searing?  I've never done that with thick steaks.  Thank you!  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@Kim Shook 

 

sorry I missed that .

 

I guess its in the chill 

 

your interest in chilling 

 

rapid == ice   bath ,   cold tap water 

 

is to preserve the done-ness you'd like in the meat 

 

that you prefer ?

 

Id say its more importatnt

 

and you know this 

 

is tho quick dry the meat 

 

before the sear 

 

Soooo those cuts are going to go on sale soon ?

 

 

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 minutes ago, rotuts said:

@Kim Shook 

 

sorry I missed that .

 

I guess its in the chill 

 

your interest in chilling 

 

rapid == ice   bath ,   cold tap water 

 

is to preserve the done-ness you'd like in the meat 

 

that you prefer ?

 

Id say its more importatnt

 

and you know this 

 

is tho quick dry the meat 

 

before the sear 

 

Soooo those cuts are going to go on sale soon ?

 

 

 

 

Rotuts.   Do you think that there is very much temperature carryover @ 130 degrees?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@gilbertlevine 

 

a very good question .

 

I do not know , 

 

is the internal temp of a FM, BT  is 130 ?

 

or a certain amount of time , perhaps got there ?

 

back toi I don't know 

 

in the end , its a technique you use

 

for yourself , and you've kept track 

 

Im not joking .

 

personally , as 130 is a temp I do things about

 

but I mostly do 130  to pasture

 

each person's preference 

 

for ' doneness '   and seared esternal tasty ness 

 

id different 

 

for BT  FM  

 

 tenderness is not really an i9ssue 

 

and tende3rness in the SV bath , is time .

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, gilbertlevine said:

Do you think that there is very much temperature carryover @ 130 degrees?

 

3 hours ago, rotuts said:

I do not know

 

There's no carryover at all.

 

In the traditional cooking model, carryover happens because the surface temperature of the food is higher than the interior (e.g. a roast that is 125°F at its center, but got there because it was in a 425°F oven). It takes a while for the overall temperature to equalize. During this time the temp at the surface will decline, as the center temp rises.

 

Since the whole point of S-V is attaining and maintaining the same temperature throughout the food -- surface to center -- carryover is a non-event.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Dave Scantland
Executive director
dscantland@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics signatory

Eat more chicken skin.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 minutes ago, Dave the Cook said:

 

 

There's no carryover at all.

 

In the traditional cooking model, carryover happens because the surface temperature of the food is higher than the interior (e.g. a roast that is 125°F at its center, but got there because it was in a 425°F oven). It takes a while for the overall temperature to equalize. During this time the temp at the surface will decline, as the center temp rises.

 

Since the whole point of S-V is attaining and maintaining the same temperature throughout the food -- surface to center -- carryover is a non-event.

Thanks Dave the cook for the explanation my post was part tongue in cheek part trying to be polite 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/26/2022 at 7:54 PM, Kim Shook said:

Advice, please!  I have a little 1 1/2 lb. beef tenderloin (I cut a big one in half).  I'd like to cook it sous vide tomorrow.  I'm thinking 125 for 2-3 hours (which?) and then sear in a hot iron skillet.  I want medium-rare - will that be too underdone?  Thanks!!!

 

I hope this isn't too late,@Kim Shook, but between my partner and our cooking classes, we've cooked well upwards of 100 beef filets (2-1/4" thick, so a little over 1 lb each). Our experience taught us that 1) 136°F (quite a bit higher than expected) yields a nice filet that is appealingly red on the inside, but pretty homely gray on the outside; 2) the most fun way to get a crusty exterior without overcooking the interior is to deep-fry the filets. (As I said, most fun.) We also found that a grill pan or a really hot cast-iron skillet will work, as will 1/4" to 1/2" of oil (perhaps fortified with buttter. All of these techniques require you to flip every 30 seconds until an appealing crust develops, so as not to overheat the interior.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 2

Dave Scantland
Executive director
dscantland@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics signatory

Eat more chicken skin.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the information, everyone!  I ended up SV it for 2.5 hours at 128.  Out of the bath:

1-IMG_9496.jpg.1090385c23a9031bb723df86c1471717.jpg

 

After the iron skillet sear:

1-IMG_9497.jpg.4db24c728aad506fe308489590dac16a.jpg

 

1-IMG_9500.jpg.95c43e46c13714420faaa97fa96fced5.jpg

 

It was delicious and so tender, but I think I'll set it for 132F or so next time.  It was a bit underdone for us and really hard to carve because it was so soft.  The other half of this will be cut into filets, so I'll be using your temperature you recommended for them, @Dave the Cook

  • Like 7
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lamb shoulder chops purchased from the farmer (rancher) frozen. Two are approximately one pound each and two are just over a pound together. They are all about 1 1/4" thick. Each is wrapped in a waxy paper (looks a bit like a paper towel) which is frozen into the meat. I would have to partially defrost the meat to remove this paper. DH thinks each has a bone but I can't see any bone (course the paper is in the way 🙄).

 

Is there any danger using sous vide with this paper?

 

Any recommendations for time and temp?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, TdeV said:

Lamb shoulder chops purchased from the farmer (rancher) frozen. Two are approximately one pound each and two are just over a pound together. They are all about 1 1/4" thick. Each is wrapped in a waxy paper (looks a bit like a paper towel) which is frozen into the meat. I would have to partially defrost the meat to remove this paper. DH thinks each has a bone but I can't see any bone (course the paper is in the way 🙄).

 

Is there any danger using sous vide with this paper?

 

Any recommendations for time and temp?

 

Stick it paper and all in a ziplock, remove the air and throw in the SV. Pull it out after a while, remove the paper, reseal, and throw back in.

It's almost never bad to feed someone.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...