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What Are You Cooking Sous Vide Today? (Part 3)


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@&roid 

 

Im a big fan of Tom Kerridge  

 

he knows what he is doing 

 

even more importantly , he realized he was getting

 

very round , and did something about it.

 

that book , and any other British cookbooks ,

 

by similar caliber GB Chefs is not available around

 

here

 

would you provide more details on that ' Hog ?"

Edited by rotuts (log)
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On 12/21/2020 at 10:32 PM, gfweb said:

Just to be clear ...you have 2 chops each 3" thick or 2 chops a total of 3" thick? Looking at the weight, I'd guess 2 chops are in that package. Could be wrong or you could have two packages.

 

I love sous vide for pork. I like 140 to 145F x 3 or 4 hours for 1.5 inch or so. Sear off the fat last.

 

 

I have two 3" thick bone in chops.  I am following @btbyrd's advice to cook at 140 for 6.5 hours, followed by a rest and then a sear.  I will report back on my results with photos (probably tomorrow).

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20 hours ago, rotuts said:

@&roid 

 

Im a big fan of Tom Kerridge  

 

he knows what he is doing 

 

even more importantly , he realized he was getting

 

very round , and did something about it.

 

that book , and any other British cookbooks ,

 

by similar caliber GB Chefs is not available around

 

here

 

would you provide more details on that ' Hog ?"


he’s brilliant isn’t he. For all the reasons you say, a very very impressive chef and person. 
 

shame about the books, I’ve only made a couple of things out of this one but I love it already. His steak and chips dish took me the best part of nine hours but was so worth it. Every element was as good as I’ve ever made - fillet of beef, triple cooked chips, onion rings, a spectacular bernaise, cafe de Paris butter and an absolutely belting red wine sauce. 
 

the “hog roast” is a multi element pig celebration. I’m only doing the belly part and some of the sides today but the whole contains:

 

- rolled and Sv belly

- braised head meat croquettes

- stuffed trotter

- a salt crust bag of baked potatoes

- little gem salad with salad cream

- apple puree

- pork sauce 

 

I’ll post a pic from the book later

 

edit: just had a look and it seems the book is available in the US in the new year... or even on kindle right now...

 

https://www.amazon.com/Hand-Flowers-Cookbook-Tom-Kerridge/dp/147293539X/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=hand+and+flowers+cookbook&qid=1608796206&sprefix=hand+and+flowers&sr=8-1

Edited by &roid (log)
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So the pork was a success.  Everyone really loved the texture and the unctuousness of the fat.  I did not get great photos because everyone was hungry and impatient.  Here is a photo of the chops post-sear, and another bad iPhone photo of it sliced (excuse my husband's hand in the background---he was slicing more meat off the bone)

 

sear2.thumb.jpg.2873aa5f3a42b8be4d254e4c1b35a042.jpg

 

pork.thumb.jpg.c357de0d33796bc1da97b07c1068939b.jpg

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Reporting back on the pork belly. Wow! What a recipe. Really enjoyed this. One day I’ll definitely try the whole thing but for now I’m really happy with the parts I did. 
 

the belly is super moist, the skin sticks really well once it’s rolled back up and it cooked evenly and quickly. The tartness of the apple purée was perfect, and I loved the salad cream. 
 

 

B8B5A6F5-4F7D-486A-B688-B31270686FBF.jpeg

5C3C8FE2-5130-4811-A916-58FFDA924957.jpeg

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@&roid - your crackling skin is gorgeous and one day, when I'm over the major fail I had trying to achieve that my way, I'll ask your advice!  

 

I might have failed in getting some good crackling by SV'ing my skin-on pork roast, but I certainly achieved incredibly delicious pork.  I thought that the skin-on roast that I picked up from my butcher was going to be too small (I wasn't), so I got another little roast from the Fresh Market.  I bagged them separately and SV'd them together.  They were both incredibly moist and tender and SO porky!

Unfortunately, I was so bummed about my lack of cracklings that I didn't get very good pictures of the meat.  The FM one:

IMG_4442.jpg.12cf6eb8e7e6a454b3e10648cf417ad8.jpg

 

The one from the butcher shop:

IMG_4444.jpg.e34cd5411ec771733d4f299e7c341614.jpg

(...and my sad, sad "cracklings".)  

 

IMG_4445.jpg.85fb7c99a7bb85e73653e14d17f8eebf.jpg

You can see how moist it is.  

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2 hours ago, Duvel said:

@Kim Shook Even without the crackling it looks very yummy - so juicy !

 

Did you insert any drying step (e.g. fridge rest, salt, ...) before roasting ? And how did you apply the heat ?

I didn't do much in the way of drying other than a direct application of towels.  As far as applying heat, I tried broiling and torching.  

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I'm by no means a pro at making cracklings. But it would seem to me that a necessary step would be to render the fat while, or perhaps before, broiling the skin to get the lovely, bubbly texture.  I know we got them as a byproduct of rendering lard....

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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There would be three steps that could help you, if you do not want to spend an extra day drying the surface in the fridge:

1) scoring the skin after SV (smaller squares preferred) to help the rendered fat “escape” the skin. 
2) Brush with saltwater to help drawing surface moisture out during the crisping up.

3) Heat with a broiler at full whack, but plenty of space to your roast. The infrared will heat through the skin layer, render the fat and pop up the skin. It will take 10~15 min, so some distance is required. Heat carryover into the meat is minimal.

 

Hope this helps (next time) ... 

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43 minutes ago, kayb said:

I'm by no means a pro at making cracklings. But it would seem to me that a necessary step would be to render the fat while, or perhaps before, broiling the skin to get the lovely, bubbly texture.  I know we got them as a byproduct of rendering lard....

 

Do you mean I should have cut the fat and skin layer off?  If so, when - before cooking or after?

IMG_4383.jpg.1fa905de1cd6b4d2ab350dedf6785e85.jpg

 

17 minutes ago, Duvel said:

There would be three steps that could help you, if you do not want to spend an extra day drying the surface in the fridge:

1) scoring the skin after SV (smaller squares preferred) to help the rendered fat “escape” the skin. 
2) Brush with saltwater to help drawing surface moisture out during the crisping up.

3) Heat with a broiler at full whack, but plenty of space to your roast. The infrared will heat through the skin layer, render the fat and pop up the skin. It will take 10~15 min, so some distance is required. Heat carryover into the meat is minimal.

 

Hope this helps (next time) ... 

The roast was scored when I got it.  Should I have asked them to leave it alone?  

 

And to anyone.  I cut off the fat cap and skin off of each slice and kept it.  Is there anything I can do to produce some cracklings with what I saved?  

 

Thank you all so much for your advice and help!

IMG_4444.jpg.da7e93b3a34b13c27e1d9c204942e7d6.jpg

 

 

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6 hours ago, Kim Shook said:

Do you mean I should have cut the fat and skin layer off?  If so, when - before cooking or after?

IMG_4383.jpg.1fa905de1cd6b4d2ab350dedf6785e85.jpg

 

The roast was scored when I got it.  Should I have asked them to leave it alone?  

 

And to anyone.  I cut off the fat cap and skin off of each slice and kept it.  Is there anything I can do to produce some cracklings with what I saved?  

 

Thank you all so much for your advice and help!

IMG_4444.jpg.da7e93b3a34b13c27e1d9c204942e7d6.jpg

 

 

 

I dont think it would much matter when you cut it off. Since you saved it, why not try putting it fat-side down into a skillet and rendering the fat...maybe medium heat? And when that's done, flip it over and see if crackling results?

 

As for scoring. I've always seen skin scored in a diamond shape, similar to how you'd score a ham.

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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20 hours ago, Kim Shook said:

@&roid - your crackling skin is gorgeous and one day, when I'm over the major fail I had trying to achieve that my way, I'll ask your advice!  

 

I might have failed in getting some good crackling by SV'ing my skin-on pork roast, but I certainly achieved incredibly delicious pork.  I thought that the skin-on roast that I picked up from my butcher was going to be too small (I wasn't), so I got another little roast from the Fresh Market.  I bagged them separately and SV'd them together.  They were both incredibly moist and tender and SO porky!

Unfortunately, I was so bummed about my lack of cracklings that I didn't get very good pictures of the meat.  The FM one:

IMG_4442.jpg.12cf6eb8e7e6a454b3e10648cf417ad8.jpg

 

The one from the butcher shop:

IMG_4444.jpg.e34cd5411ec771733d4f299e7c341614.jpg

(...and my sad, sad "cracklings".)  

 

IMG_4445.jpg.85fb7c99a7bb85e73653e14d17f8eebf.jpg

You can see how moist it is.  

Meat looks great.

You could dissect off the fat and bake it between two sheet pans to make cracklings

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@Kim Shook, the crackling on this pork was really good and I think that came down to the method. It was certainly a lot better than my usual attempts!

 

as others have suggested, separating the skin from the meat is very helpful. In this case the sheet of skin was cooked SV at 70°C for 24 hours. After this time it was seriously soft with all of the collagen broken right down. Before starting there was very little fat on the underside which I think was helpful. 
 

I reapplied the skin to the cooked meat before crisping but I’m sure it could have been cooked separately too. Maybe dried the sheet in the fridge overnight before using the broiler or a very hot convection oven. 
 

edit:

 

this is the skin before and after SV:

CDBEE20C-B650-43CB-A269-9C26D79D7C71.thumb.jpeg.a897afccc1c728c827d73a042efd51f6.jpegF5F0DEB0-6B7F-4E24-AE10-46D36269AF37.thumb.jpeg.85f04db0113d0542662adfac37106ede.jpeg


mane reuinted with the rolled belly before tying and blasting at 230°C:

 

404C2400-996C-4A05-8A82-BCA8A4E7E94E.thumb.jpeg.8bbe0ec7e19e204359bc7a8691149855.jpeg

Edited by &roid (log)
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  • 2 weeks later...
On 12/21/2020 at 11:51 AM, btbyrd said:

Sous vide cooking times increase exponentially as thickness increases. A slab of meat four inches thick takes at least three times as long to cook as one that is only two inches thick. If you're cooking a tender cut to a particular core temperature, you can consult charts (like those from Doug Baldwin) to see how long something will take to come up to temperature. These charts usually list times for slab-shaped items, cylindrical items, and sphere-shaped items. For steaks and chops, consult the slab column. For pork chops 3" thick, cook for 6.5 hours.

 

Also, I'm jealous of those awesome looking red waddle chops. Heritage Foods USA are good people.

 

On 12/21/2020 at 12:27 PM, btbyrd said:

I'm not talking about holding items for extended periods to break down collagen. You don't need to do that with pork chops anyway. I'm talking about the time it takes for the core of an item to reach the temperature of the bath. Per Doug Baldwin:

 

baldwin_sv_chart.thumb.png.5d09a0bd74b2c07279c22fa37e603776.png

 

I did a 2 1/8" (54 mm) pork chop (from frozen) at 137°F for 3.5 hours, then iced it; it's in the back of fridge now.

Based on these quoted comments, that wasn't long enough to cook it.

Can I continue to cook it, or is it safer to throw it out?

How long do I cook it for?

 

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I'd eat it and serve it to my non-immunocompromised family members. Baldwin's timetable isn't an indication of how long it takes for an item to cook per se, but rather how long it takes for the temperature of the core to reach (basically) the temperature of the bath. This results in that uniform, edge-to-edge doneness that is associated with most SV cooking techniques. But if you don't care about the core being the exact same temperature as the edges, a piece of meat can be cooked all the way through (i.e., the core is at 130F or higher) faster than the times listed in the table.

 

I broke out the Polyscience SV Toolbox app to do some calculations. In a 137F water bath, a 2 1/8" thick pork chop starting out at 33F will reach a core temp of 130F after 2 hours and 19 minutes. It will reach 135F at 3 hours and 16 minutes. And because it takes the core so long to come up the final degree or two when cooking SV, it won't reach 137F in less than four hours and the app will not provide the calculation (though Baldwin's table suggests it'd take roughly 4 hours). 

 

TLDR: your chop is fully cooked, even though the core didn't reach the same temp as the bath. If you're going to retherm it SV, keep in mind that it's not going to reheat any faster than it took to cook; it'll still need to hang out in the bath for a couple/few hours. Finally, FWIW, ChefSteps suggests cooking a frozen 2" chop for 2 hours and 15 minutes. 

 

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  • 2 months later...

I have some boneless lamb shoulder roast left over from a tagine of the other half. Trying to decide how to cook it since there is a fair bit of fat etc. so I want to cook long enough to get it tender. Am thinking of sous vide then sear but am unsure of a good time/temp. My other thought is to unroll it and do on the gas grill to be sure the fat renders at the expense of overcooking.

It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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11 minutes ago, TdeV said:

@haresfur, my usual lamb shoulder/leg is done between 138°F and 144°F (whim) for 2 or 3 days. I use the higher temperature when I want less fat in the finished product.

 

 

Thanks. I would have thought that shoulder needs higher temperature/longer time than leg.

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It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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15 hours ago, haresfur said:

Thanks. I would have thought that shoulder needs higher temperature/longer time than leg.

 

Curious. I've always thought lamb leg/shoulder equivalent. Wrong, am I?

😜

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1 hour ago, TdeV said:

 

Curious. I've always thought lamb leg/shoulder equivalent. Wrong, am I?

😜


That depends on your animal. For young lamb in terms of treatment yes. Older animals will differ and the leg would need a bit more time. But if the precision is „2-3 days“ - yes, they will be equivalent ...

 

7B76C28E-E2E1-44EF-8037-F9BB33359AE2.thumb.jpeg.a6393c32688de920adf3d9b10cf3b062.jpeg

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