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What Are You Cooking Sous Vide Today? (Part 3)


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I picked up a whole bunch of moulard duck legs yesterday. I froze 3 packages and was planning on sv-ing 2 packages (4 legs individually bagged).  I'm not really looking for a confit-like texture - more like a tender/juicy roast duck texture... I haven't dug out my Modernist Cuisine book in ages, but it recommends 144F for 12 hours...

 

What do people think about this?

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that sounds about right

 

I do turkey thighs   142.5  for 8 hours

 

why the  .5 ?

 

145 I thought to high , too much Jus  in the bag

 

and 140 not his enough    so 1/2 way in-between .

 

skin is terrible , and for turkey I leave it out.

 

for duck , Id render it for the fat wh9ich id save.

 

turkey and chicken fat , I dont care for at all.

 

Duck fat :   fantastic in the winter re potatoes shallow 

 

fried in a pan.

Edited by rotuts (log)
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OK - the duck legs are out of the water and have chilled - but most of the fat remains unrendered.  I was planning on reheating them in the CSO to crisp the skin - what do people think - will the rest of the fat render in the time it will take to reheat and crisp the skin?  Or maybe I should put it in a 80C bath for an hour or so to render the fat and then rechill?

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On 9/3/2020 at 7:51 PM, btbyrd said:

Isn’t that what nitrites are for? I thought we were just trying to mellow it.


Mellowing it a bit and adjusting the texture a little was the original goal but the possibility of botulism is not an acceptable trade-off. If the curing salt in the sausage is a sure safeguard for that, that'd be great. The sausage will never come anywhere close to the 240 F mentioned above even for a second. 

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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It's Thanksgiving day in Canada today and since neither me nor my daughter are big turkey fans, our tradition now is steak. So right now there are 2 strips, 2 filets, and a bag of top sirloin cubes in the tank at 54 C. The sirloin cubes are going to be seared in hot garlic butter. The others are going to get a quick sear on the grill or in a hot pan depending if the grill gas holds up... I forgot to get the tank filled.

 

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It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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@KennethT 

 

I apologize for not adding an ' alert ' for my post.

 

personally I think that the temps for completely rendering the fat 

 

are too high for optimum meat cooking , even dark leg meat.

 

and i like Duck Br's on the rarer side.

 

on the other hand , although not via SV 

 

Madeleine Kamman 

 

https://www.amazon.com/New-Making-Cook-Techniques-Science/dp/0688152546/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=the+new+making+of+a+cook&qid=1602598917&s=books&sr=1-1

 

did ' Duck Two Ways "  :

 

bone  out the breast  ( w the skin on )

 

score the skin , a cook in a hot pan to get the skin brown , then flip and finish in an oven

 

keeping the meat pi9nk.

 

legs ( + skin ) were roasted on a rack over water  at a high temp

 

400 - 425 F    for 40 - 45 minutes.

 

the water prevented the drippings from burning  and they will burn if not careful

 

first course was the sliced pink duck breasts

 

second duck course were the very crispy and very tasty duck legs

 

the fat was rendered , and the legs were moist and the skin very crispy 

 

I made these several times for my father.   the problem w the legs

 

is they were very very hot   and it tried ones patience to wait for them to cool a bit

 

thus one invariably burt ones mouth on the first bite

 

best duck legs ever , I think.    

 

but no SV was involved.

 

the duck legs were oc course  the leg + thigh.

 

on trimmed the fat on the legs so none of the skin was tucked under the

 

thigh.   there was fat in the water pan after the cooking which one might save.

 

the fat will splatter in your oven and you will get some smoke from this

 

techiique.   this will interest your smoke alarms !

 

I dont low what temp the leg meat got to , having no digital thermometers 

 

back then.    but the combination of very crispy skin , and some crispy

 

fat still left on the legs , very very hot , muted any greasy feel or taste.

 

give this a try for legs , but beware of the smoke !

 

these days one would save the carcass and iPot it for dup stock

 

plain , or roasted first.   didn't do that back then

 

a mistake

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by rotuts (log)
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My friend made some very slow oven-cooked tomato juice which I'm interested in replicating sous vide, in part because I think the sous-viding will help preserve the fresh tomato juice. Am I wrong on that idea?

 

What time and temp?

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What about it are you trying to replicate? I don't know why one would cook tomato juice in an oven as opposed to on the stovetop, but using either method I'd wager that much of the result would be a consequence of evaporative flavor concentration (which you wouldn't get in a bag). If you're looking to actually cook the juice to deepen the flavor, this takes quite some time using SV at high temps.

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10 hours ago, TdeV said:

My friend made some very slow oven-cooked tomato juice which I'm interested in replicating sous vide, in part because I think the sous-viding will help preserve the fresh tomato juice. Am I wrong on that idea?

 

What time and temp?

 

I can tomato juice every year, a byproduct of canning tomatoes. I just toss my peeled and diced tomatoes in a colander over a pot or pitcher, transfer the collected juice to a pan, add a splash of lemon juice and some salt and heat only minimally; I don't even boil it. Then it processes in the water bath for 15 minutes. It separates as it cools in the jars, but a good shake handles that.

 

Tastes just like a fresh tomato to me, if that's what you're wanting.

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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@TdeV 

 

Id go lower and see how it works out.

 

remembering tenderness is time , not so much temp alone,

 

142.5   from mu chicken experiments 

 

I cant say how chickens relate to beef tongue  ....

 

for me , and most meats , the higher the temp , the more Jus in the bag.

 

as tenderness is what we are usually after , I err on the side or more Jus in the meat.

 

looking forward myself , after a series of vaccinations , a series  

 

of finding some tongue and getting involved in this myself.

 

I used to love Tongue sandwiches , sliced very very thin 

 

a long time ago.

 

what I dont know , if that tongue was corned or not.

 

something to look forward to

 

next year.

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On 10/11/2020 at 12:59 PM, KennethT said:

I picked up a whole bunch of moulard duck legs yesterday. I froze 3 packages and was planning on sv-ing 2 packages (4 legs individually bagged).  I'm not really looking for a confit-like texture - more like a tender/juicy roast duck texture... I haven't dug out my Modernist Cuisine book in ages, but it recommends 144F for 12 hours...

 

What do people think about this?

 

That's right. Might be a little long. 144 should avoid confit texture

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2 hours ago, gfweb said:

 

That's right. Might be a little long. 144 should avoid confit texture

Don't know if I reported back - 144 for 12 hours yielded very little jus and rendered almost no fat. It also wasn't as tender as I thought it would be and benefited from a short braise in the sauce I made. I'll try roasting to finish soon.

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