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FrogPrincesse

What Are You Cooking Sous Vide Today? (Part 3)

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First foray into Sauerbraten.  Yes, middle of summer Sauerbraten, not exactly a light dish.  But it was requested, so there we go.

 

I used 3.5 lb chuck roast, marinated 3 days in a sour beer and some additional vinegar with the bay, juniper, allspice, peppercorns......etc

 

Just finished the 24 hours at 65C.  Now I am reducing the sauce.  This is actually not going to served for a few hours, but I needed an early morning finish to get the stuff together.   

 

Smells good, first test taste of meat tells me it needs salt, but the sauce will probably make up for that.

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Posted (edited)

@lemniscate

 

nice .  I love SB  .  I used to make it for my father , but in chunks rather than a roast.

 

I could never get the finished roast to slice nicely .  fell apart 

 

so I made SB  ' stew '  w large chunks of marinated meat

 

tasted the same.

 

and BTW :  " needs salt ' is way better than " too salty "

 

in the fall Ill try to find some chuck or flap-meat and make some SB for the winter.

 

thanks for the idea 

 

money-mouth.gif.5123471cc5cef2839f673dcab80ddc9d.gif


Edited by rotuts (log)

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@rotuts  Yes, I think in my very novice experience on SB that the sauce is the key, and if the sauce is good, it will transfer to the meat.   I do undersalt as a rule and add at the end.   So true, "needs salt" is my Safe Space.

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yes   SB is all about the sauce.

 

did you use German Ginger Snaps ?

 

hard to find , as they re not sweet .

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7 minutes ago, rotuts said:

yes   SB is all about the sauce.

 

did you use German Ginger Snaps ?

 

hard to find , as they re not sweet .

No, got lazy and didn't look, I am using raisins, some brown sugar, and a dash of ground ginger to makeshift.

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24 minutes ago, Kim Shook said:

I'm cooking this tomorrow, but I put it in the vacuum bag yesterday:

DSCN9882.JPG.669c2b78f0ee0e0995ebff0f80829da4.JPG

Do I need to open it and drain it before cooking?  Thanks!

I would. Any thought on why it blew up?

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17 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

I would. Any thought on why it blew up?

It is actually still pretty well "sucked" (sorry - that's how we refer to it - we also call it "the suck machine").  It's just that a lot of juice has collected.  It is still perfectly sealed.  

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2 minutes ago, Kim Shook said:

It is actually still pretty well "sucked" (sorry - that's how we refer to it - we also call it "the suck machine").  It's just that a lot of juice has collected.  It is still perfectly sealed.  

I did wonder if it might be picture related!

 

 

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1 hour ago, Kim Shook said:

I'm cooking this tomorrow, but I put it in the vacuum bag yesterday:

DSCN9882.JPG.669c2b78f0ee0e0995ebff0f80829da4.JPG

Do I need to open it and drain it before cooking?  Thanks!

I have the same with Lamb rumps. When I get them I individually package them with a few branches of rosemary and freeze them. To use I usually just thaw then SV. As they thaw they end up with some liquid. I just SV as is.

The liquid will "cook" somewhat but it would probably be OK to use to make a sauce. I usually discard it.

If the meat in your picture was partially frozen or even very cold, then as it warms the liquid will come out more than "normal" In lot cases of meat we buy already packaged  has absorbent material to sop up the liquids that come out naturally. This improves the "look" and handling for marketing purposes.

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On 7/20/2019 at 9:52 AM, lemniscate said:

First foray into Sauerbraten.


This is amazing. I came to this thread entirely to ask about doing sauerbraten sous vide. I was unwilling to read through 49 pages of sous vide discussion and nothing came up for me via a search so I was just going to ask and here it is on the current last page of the discussion. So what was the verdict on the end result? Did it seem worth doing over more traditional methods? I was going to ask if doing the pre-marinade was necessary if the cook was going to go on for 48 hours or more but I guess the only way to really know would be to do one of each. Marinade one for a few days then plunk it in the tank along with one that went in the bag with the marinade just before cooking. I don't plan on doing it until cooler weather arrives even though there's really no good reason not to... it's just stuck in my head as a cooler weather meal along with bourguignon.

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It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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@Tri2Cook  I marinaded in the fridge for 4 days.  My roasts were 3ish lbs apiece.  I did 24 hours and It.WAS.Tender.   Not fall apart tender, slicing tender, like butter.  I had a picture it plated, but can't for the life of me find it now.   I would definitely do this again. 

 

I used this page as a guideline.   Also on the page is a condiment made with raisins to go with the sauerbraten.  Don't skip this, it's awesome.

 

https://www.fusionchef.de/en/sous-vide-recipes/basics/marinated-beef-sauerbraten-sous-vide-mashed-potatoes

 

There's one here, but it's a FaceBook page:

 

 

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8 hours ago, lemniscate said:

I used this page as a guideline.   Also on the page is a condiment made with raisins to go with the sauerbraten.  Don't skip this, it's awesome.


Thanks for the feedback and the links. The raisin condiment will be a bit of a test. While I'm not so bad as to remove raisins from things if they're already there, I very rarely intentionally add them to anything either. But several years ago I pickled some raisins for a dish I did when the TGRWT series was still running and I actually liked them that way. So maybe if the raisins spend enough time in the marinade to take on that effect I'd be willing to give it a shot.

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It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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1 hour ago, Tri2Cook said:

The raisin condiment will be a bit of a test.

 

I truly dislike raisins, but chopped up in this sweet and sour style, it was a revelation to me.

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14 hours ago, lemniscate said:

 

I truly dislike raisins, but chopped up in this sweet and sour style, it was a revelation to me.

 

I despise them as well.  Many are the pastries that have been ruined by those foul things.

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sometimes I use dried cranberries , TJ's has a large supply

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Oddly, I can deal with raisins as long as they're in a salad or by themselves. I just don't liked them baked in anything.

 


Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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1 hour ago, rotuts said:

sometimes I use dried cranberries , TJ's has a large supply

excellent stuff

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A bit of an experiment, the supermarket had boneless lamb shanks for less per kilo than the bone in. I treated them like bone-in shanks in the sv for about 72 hrs at 58C. Then chopped up the meat to add to Massaman curry at the last minute. I don't know exactly what the butcher did but the pack contained several large pieces of pure meat with little of the tough stuff. It ended up too soft but very tasty. Next time, I think I'll go no more than 24 hours and maybe drop the temp down to 57.

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It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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@haresfur

 

have you had Lamb  say 130 or 55 C  ?

 

its delicious , and with SV , you can have tender Lamb @ 55 C

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14 hours ago, rotuts said:

@haresfur

 

have you had Lamb  say 130 or 55 C  ?

 

its delicious , and with SV , you can have tender Lamb @ 55 C

 

I believe I started doing shanks that low but can't remember. I tend to go a bit higher in temperature than many people do for red meat - at least in part due to the dearly beloved. Maybe I'll get another set of the shanks and try bracketing...

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It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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I'm preparing for a dinner party this weekend, so am anxious for advice. Consulting Mourad: The New Moroccan , Wadi: New Mediterranean Cookbook, and Wolfert: Morocco.

 

Nearly all my meat is done sous vide. I had a question about using recipes not designed for sous vide, and how one "should" go about interpreting those recipes. Looking at 5.4 lbs of lamb shoulder. Wolfert, for example, has grand recipes for slowly cooking in a tagine. If one cooks only the vegetables in the tagine, doesn't that adversely affect the pot liquour? What do other folks do? Do you change the recipe so that the meat is cooked sous vide and then folded in to the rest at the end? Do you bypass dishes that weren't designed for sous vide?  Here's my original question.

 

@JoNorvelleWalker gave some insightful advice, but I'd like a bit more. TIA.

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