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What Are You Cooking Sous Vide Today? (Part 3)


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7 minutes ago, TdeV said:

@EatingBen, once I had had lamb leg/shoulder done at 143F (62C) for 48 hours, I was hooked. Lately I've been using 131F (55C) for 24 hours following something Douglas Baldwin wrote about on an eGullet thread. Finish with a broiler or a blow torch.

 

Divine, I tell you, divine!

I do 60 for about 48 hours for a large cut. Not done 55 before though. I'd be interested to know what Douglas Baldwin mentioned though? 

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Brisket.  Mainly following this recipe. I didn't start until after dinner one night, so it went into the spa @133 F after 10 p.m.  I wasn't sure whether I would smoke it afterwards, but in the end I decided not to; so it was in the water for 66 hr. total. The recipe says 48 is enough & I think that's probably true. After half an hour rest in the bag it came out & looked like this:

IMG_2558.thumb.JPG.f532cf721974d47e76c0e8885d38c2f3.JPG

 

Then I grilled it on high for 5 min (BBQ lid open) on the meaty side side & a minute or so on the fatty side (Yes, there was a fire). The recipe says longer, but everything else was close to ready, and we were hungry.

 

IMG_2560.thumb.JPG.658bfd4d069d5bcb472525ce1570851d.JPGIMG_2559.thumb.JPG.7ec7ae5a7e095603fb5996fb8e914fef.JPG

 

I sliced it thin.

 

IMG_2561.thumb.JPG.d9518c1a275dcb64133b17dfef35610c.JPG

 

It was very tender - not falling apart, but I would have liked it a bit firmer. I was aiming for a flank steak texture.  I might try 131 next time, and no more than 48 hr.  The fat was delicious :)

 

IMG_2566.thumb.JPG.287cc524e4e904ef4d23b8f294d41e8a.JPG

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I did lemon curd in jars today, 167F for 1 hour (1 pint and 3 half pints).  I am still on my tear of using the most out of the free citrus in the neighborhood.  I use a whole egg recipe.  A couple of my jars let water in, but no curd leaked out.  Not sure if I didn't tighten the lids *just* enough or if there were issues with the lids themselves.  Despite the water, it did not seem to ruin the curd.  Very smooth, very tasty.  I'll be making more in the next few days.   I might try the next batch in the Instant Pot though.

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35 minutes ago, lemniscate said:

I did lemon curd in jars today, 167F for 1 hour (1 pint and 3 half pints).  I am still on my tear of using the most out of the free citrus in the neighborhood.  I use a whole egg recipe.  A couple of my jars let water in, but no curd leaked out.  Not sure if I didn't tighten the lids *just* enough or if there were issues with the lids themselves.  Despite the water, it did not seem to ruin the curd.  Very smooth, very tasty.  I'll be making more in the next few days.   I might try the next batch in the Instant Pot though.

Majorly jealous of your citrus bounty!

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1 hour ago, Shelby said:

Majorly jealous of your citrus bounty!

 

If you were closer, I would put buckets full on your doorstep.  Lemons/grapefruit are the zucchinis of our backyard produce world around here, don't leave your car unlocked or you will find "gifted" citrus on the seat.  People do hoard the Navels, Minneolas and AZ sweets oranges, rightfully so.  I haven't been able to get free oranges this year......:S

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13 minutes ago, lemniscate said:

 

If you were closer, I would put buckets full on your doorstep.  Lemons/grapefruit are the zucchinis of our backyard produce world around here, don't leave your car unlocked or you will find "gifted" citrus on the seat.  People do hoard the Navels, Minneolas and AZ sweets oranges, rightfully so.  I haven't been able to get free oranges this year......:S

Ohhhhh I'd leave my car open for any of that!!!

 

How interesting each of our lives are lol....zucchini vs. citrus being left in cars lol.

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Further adventures in sous vide and then fried:

 

Wild pheasant breasts

 

IMG_6083.jpg.37687e03c15867205f0801b8ac8165fa.jpg

IMG_6084.jpg.2a2f39c3afc71b73cfa18cfa15e42898.jpg

141F for 45 mins.

 

IMG_6085.JPG.c3b83bcf8fca616574f304af917a3897.JPG

 

Swimming in the egg and buttermilk pool

 

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Dredged in the usual flour, Lawry's salt and black pepper and fried

 

IMG_6087.jpg.f3e451c2e88011e9d6c8ae5bb1af2dab.jpg

 

Very tender and juicy :)

 

 

 

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On 3/31/2019 at 3:36 PM, lemniscate said:

I did lemon curd in jars today, 167F for 1 hour (1 pint and 3 half pints).  I am still on my tear of using the most out of the free citrus in the neighborhood.  I use a whole egg recipe.  A couple of my jars let water in, but no curd leaked out.  Not sure if I didn't tighten the lids *just* enough or if there were issues with the lids themselves.  Despite the water, it did not seem to ruin the curd.  Very smooth, very tasty.  I'll be making more in the next few days.   I might try the next batch in the Instant Pot though.

 

7 hours ago, lemniscate said:

I used this recipe for inspiration.  

 

Just for clarification: the recipe you linked to uses 3 whole eggs. Does your comment above, about using a whole egg recipe, simply refer to using entire eggs instead of parts? Or did you use only 1 egg?

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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34 minutes ago, Smithy said:

Just for clarification: the recipe you linked to uses 3 whole eggs. Does your comment above, about using a whole egg recipe, simply refer to using entire eggs instead of parts? Or did you use only 1 egg?

 

I actually doubled that recipe and used 6 whole eggs, whites and yolks.   The color of the curd is a lighter yellow than just using yolks.

 

I was referring to the recipe as a "whole egg" version, rather than the typical yolk only versions.

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1 minute ago, lemniscate said:

 

I actually doubled that recipe and used 6 whole eggs, whites and yolks.   The color of the curd is a lighter yellow than just using yolks.

 

I was referring to the recipe as a "whole egg" version, rather than the typical yolk only versions.

 

Thanks for that clarification. Have you tried it yet? If so, how is the level of sweetness?

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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22 minutes ago, Smithy said:

 

Thanks for that clarification. Have you tried it yet? If so, how is the level of sweetness?

 

Yes, but I will say I used the recipe for "inspiration" meaning I kind of did my own thing otherwise.  The texture in the jars that were sous vided is like a soft flan texture, but spreadable.  I backed off on the sweetening quite a bit (sorry no measurements) and bumped up the zest amount quite a bit.  I was tasting it as I was making it to adjust for my preference.  It's tart, smooth and has the adult "bite" of zest.   I am going to make it again in the Instant Pot in jars since I had some water incursion issues with the sous vide.  

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1 hour ago, lemniscate said:

 

Yes, but I will say I used the recipe for "inspiration" meaning I kind of did my own thing otherwise.  The texture in the jars that were sous vided is like a soft flan texture, but spreadable.  I backed off on the sweetening quite a bit (sorry no measurements) and bumped up the zest amount quite a bit.  I was tasting it as I was making it to adjust for my preference.  It's tart, smooth and has the adult "bite" of zest.   I am going to make it again in the Instant Pot in jars since I had some water incursion issues with the sous vide.  

 

Thanks for that information. I find that my sweet tooth isn't what it used to be, and some lemon curds are cloyingly sweet. When you do it in the Instant Pot, I'll be interested to see what the differences turn out to be.

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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3 hours ago, rotuts said:

@Shelby

 

nice

 

very nice

 

and theLegs and thighs ?

 

just asking

 

suprise.gif.c4b7a631dfbf2b8ede5263b3b8a9adb3.gif

I have some outside in the big freezer.  I'll do those soon.  We can only take so many fried things a week lol.  My plan is to do those a bit longer since they are tougher and have bones.....but I don't think I'll up the temp.  Or maybe I should....I dunno

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I have a sous vide question, and I hope this is a good place to ask it.

 

Yesterday, I cooked a chicken leg quarter SV from frozen for 2 hours @ 160 F. When I took the chicken out of the water, the juices inside were blood-red (see picture). I know that this is myoglobin and the chicken tasted just fine. However, I was wondering why this happened as I've never seen it before. I've cooked other leg quarters SV as well, and in fact, some of the other quarters were from the exact same package as this one. I believe I cooked those other quarters at slightly higher temps (165 F instead of 160 F). Also, this quarter was in the freezer for about four months prior to cooking.

IMG_1005.thumb.jpg.15f2ef5ff49de9858dfa1106573d4df5.jpg

 

Any idea why the juices turned red? Cooking temp? Freezer storage? Happenstance?

Edited by chord (log)
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  • 2 weeks later...

I just lightly rubbed s strip steak with RB 40 fish sauce, put it in a jelly bag which in turn was put on a rack in the fridge.  I'll give it a couple of days before I SV it.  I think I will turn it over at the 24 hour mark in case it makes a difference.  Thank you @rotuts for your help.

20190413_194012.jpg

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On 4/4/2019 at 12:04 AM, chord said:

I have a sous vide question, and I hope this is a good place to ask it.

 

Yesterday, I cooked a chicken leg quarter SV from frozen for 2 hours @ 160 F. When I took the chicken out of the water, the juices inside were blood-red (see picture). I know that this is myoglobin and the chicken tasted just fine. However, I was wondering why this happened as I've never seen it before. I've cooked other leg quarters SV as well, and in fact, some of the other quarters were from the exact same package as this one. I believe I cooked those other quarters at slightly higher temps (165 F instead of 160 F). Also, this quarter was in the freezer for about four months prior to cooking.

IMG_1005.thumb.jpg.15f2ef5ff49de9858dfa1106573d4df5.jpg

 

Any idea why the juices turned red? Cooking temp? Freezer storage? Happenstance?

 

I’ve not seen this. I think myoglobin cooks at about 140 f. 

 

I dont one know what else might stay red T 160f

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America’s Test Kitchen did a sous vide show today. Decent. Best tip was SV poached eggs 167f for 12 minutes. 

 

They tried to stay uncomplicated but In doing that  missed the principles...temp =doneness...time = tenderness

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2 hours ago, gfweb said:

I’ve not seen this. I think myoglobin cooks at about 140 f. 

 

I dont one know what else might stay red T 160f

I did some online googling and although I didn't get a definitive answer, I did see a bunch of reports online of other people who had similar experiences at temps above 140º. For example, here's a reddit post:  Chicken Drumsticks. 2 Hours at 165F and red juice came pouring out?

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and lets not forget the ATK  added 1/4 cup oil to help remove air , having no vacuum system , rather then the straw / displacement method

 

guess they never spilled a bag when opening after its done.

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27 minutes ago, rotuts said:

and lets not forget the ATK  added 1/4 cup oil to help remove air , having no vacuum system , rather then the straw / displacement method

 

guess they never spilled a bag when opening after its done.

I thought that was odd

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