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What Are You Cooking Sous Vide Today? (Part 3)


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Good lord, people. Don't use a hair dryer on your meat; blot it dry with paper towels. If that's still not dry enough for you, plop it on a rack in the fridge for like 10 minutes. Refrigeration sucks moisture from the air,  so your fridge is a great place to let surface moisture "flash off" (as Dave Arnold refers to the process). The air in your fridge isn't cold enough or conductive enough to really drop the core temp of your meat in that short amount of time, and it gives you a bit of extra insurance against overcooking during the final sear step.

 

Hair dryers.

 

Honestly.

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Here's a controversial opinion that I don't think should be controversial: blowtorches suck. For searing, I mean.

 

I would rather use pretty much anything else. Cast iron, carbon steel, deep frying, grilling, a charcoal chimney starter, a cheap nonstick pan from Ikea... all preferable to the abominable torch.

 

Even with a Searzall.

 

Do you like "crusts" that are somehow both weak *and* scorched beyond recognition? Do you like spotty, uneven sears that take forever to form? Do you find torch taste delicious? Do you live in a dorm? Are you, perhaps, on a camping trip, or driving across the country, or doing something else that involves being far away from a kitchen and actual cooking equipment? Then perhaps a torch is for you!

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12 hours ago, btbyrd said:

Good lord, people. Don't use a hair dryer on your meat; blot it dry with paper towels. If that's still not dry enough for you, plop it on a rack in the fridge for like 10 minutes. Refrigeration sucks moisture from the air,  so your fridge is a great place to let surface moisture "flash off" (as Dave Arnold refers to the process). The air in your fridge isn't cold enough or conductive enough to really drop the core temp of your meat in that short amount of time, and it gives you a bit of extra insurance against overcooking during the final sear step.

 

Hair dryers.

 

Honestly.

 

Granted the relative humidity in my refrigerator is too low for me to measure with my hygrometer.  However unless you own a fancy refrigerator that circulates dry air I'm not sure refrigerator drying will be that rapid -- besides, low humidity or not, water condenses on most everything in my refrigerator.

 

Last night I did a boneless pork chop sous vide,  58C.  That seems to have been a good temperature for me but there were problems.*  This particular package of boneless rib chops were pre-brined.  Then I salted again before bagging.  After anovaing I dried with paper towels and the hair dryer on hot to see the difference from drying cool.  Wasn't paying much attention (blame World of Warcraft) and the blow drier rendered the fat.  Oops.

 

After pan searing the pork was ham-like.  Tender, juicy, and not bad at all, but the unmistakable somewhat rubbery texture of ham.  Last time I buy expensive (granted, on sale) pre-brined fresh pork.

 

I still think hair drying on cool has its place in my culinary repertoire.

 

 

*dropping on the floor was one.

 

 

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12 hours ago, btbyrd said:

Good lord, people. Don't use a hair dryer on your meat; blot it dry with paper towels. If that's still not dry enough for you, plop it on a rack in the fridge for like 10 minutes. Refrigeration sucks moisture from the air,  so your fridge is a great place to let surface moisture "flash off" (as Dave Arnold refers to the process). The air in your fridge isn't cold enough or conductive enough to really drop the core temp of your meat in that short amount of time, and it gives you a bit of extra insurance against overcooking during the final sear step.

 

Hair dryers.

 

Honestly.

 

I use my hairdryer to light my charcoal grill. I use it to loosen silicon gaskets. I use it to harden the papier-mâché works of my little son a bit faster ... 

I use toothpaste to polish watches. I use the daily newspaper to open beer bottles. I use Old Fashioneds to reduce the amount of ice cubes in my freezer ...

If something works for things it wasn’t originally intended for, is it that bad to make use of it anyway ?

Edited by Duvel (log)
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32 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 Wasn't paying much attention (blame World of Warcraft) and the blow drier rendered the fat.  Oops.

 

 

 

 

 

Warhawk is occasionally my undoing. 

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25 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Granted the relative humidity in my refrigerator is too low for me to measure with my hygrometer.  However unless you own a fancy refrigerator that circulates dry air I'm not sure refrigerator drying will be that rapid -- besides, low humidity or not, water condenses on most everything in my refrigerator.



 

My knowledge of the refrigerator technique comes from Modernist Cuisine and Dave Arnold. I frankly don't feel the need for it most of the time, as paper towels do a fine job. It can be useful on poultry skin if you want it super crispy. But I don't believe water vapor is going to condense on a warm piece of meat in the fridge, as condensation forms on cool surfaces rather than hot ones.

 

And since I'm deliberately being a bit provocative in this thread, I'll go ahead and say it: If you feel compelled to blow dry a steak/chop/whatever (or put it in the fridge after blotting with paper towels) then your problem with searing isn't moisture-related. Your searing medium just isn't hot enough.

 

 

16 minutes ago, Duvel said:

 

I use my hairdryer to light my charcoal grill. I use it to loosen silicon gaskets. I use it to harden the papier-mâché works of my little son a bit faster ... 

 I use toothpaste to polish watches. I use the daily newspaper to open beer bottles. I use Old Fashioneds to reduce the amount of ice cubes in my freezer ...

If something works for things it wasn’t originally intended for, is it that bad to make use of it anyway ?

 

 

Oh, I use my hair dryer for many uses for which it was not intended. I've certainly used it to light charcoal before, though my leaf blower does a better job. It's not the departure from intended use to which I object. But using a hair dryer on sous vide protein strikes me as unnecessary, unhygienic, and a bad technique that makes you more likely to overcook your meat.

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There is nothing wrong with using a hair dryer (on Cool) to remove moisture from food, like a chicken. Probably should use a dedicated hair dryer, but regardless, it is a great technique. 

 

I can’t be the only person who has read this - https://www.newyorker.com/culture/annals-of-gastronomy/yes-i-use-a-hair-dryer-to-make-roast-chicken

 

It is completely valid. Hell, Anthony Bourdain was an early advocate. The major takeaway from that recipe though is the incremental method of cooking the chicken. I’ve done it twice, sans hair dryer as I was able to allow the chicken to sit in the fridge long enough the first time and the second time I realized I had no idea where my wife keeps her hair dryer. That incremental method of cooking the chicken yields amazing results. Truly worth doing. Maybe not every time, but definitely from time to time. 

 

And use a hair dryer! Don’t be afraid!

 

edit: As this pertains to Sous Vide cooked meat, I wouldn’t worry about moisture past blotting it with paper towels. The way you sear it is more important. I agree with that assessment. Throwing it in the freezer for 5-10 minutes before searing will protect against overcooking during the sear too. Apologize if my hair dryer rant was a bit off topic given this thread is specifically aimed at sous vide cooking. Just can’t help myself when hair dryers are brought up I guess!

Edited by Robenco15 (log)
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Not sous vide per se -- but as pertains to drying chicken:  I let tonight's half hen rest on a rack in the refrigerator for several hours.  The bird was not visibly less damp than when I put it in, except that some liquid had pooled in the pan below the rack.  Perchance next time I'll have the patience to try for 24 or 48.

 

But anyhow the chicken is currently getting a blowout.

 

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Did Lamb shanks to this recipe https://recipes.anovaculinary.com/recipe/sous-vide-moroccan-spice-lamb-shank but with a few modifications.

I simmered the marinade for about 15 minutes and then allowed it to cool.  I think this is a better way to incorporate the spices. I have found that spices remain a little course and don't combine and develop their flavors as much when used for long low temperature cooking

I used 62C for 48 hours then 68C for 12 hours.

I also wrapped the shanks in foil and placed in a warm (60C) oven after the long cooking while I did the next step, because the next step took about 20 mins.

I hate just warm food rather than hot food.

I also did what one of the comments said about the chick peas, that is strained the cooking liquid, added the chick peas and apricots and then reduced the cooking liquid to form a sauce.

Texture of the meat was excellent, very moist, falling off the bone but still close to its original volume, the sinews had softened and a lot of the fat was rendered out. 

As usual more interested in the result and forgot to take pictures.

Served with garlic bread (to sop up the sauce afterwards), though I think there was more than enough meat /chick peas/apricots.

 

Next time I will add a 1/2 teaspoon of white pepper just to the cooking liquid, just to give it a tang.

 

We have a favorite "Lamb Shanks Rogan Josh" conventional recipe we had tried a few days before. Its a "braise" for 3 hours and used to be the standard for Lamb Shanks in texture and flavor, but now its firmly in second place.

 

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On October 29, 2018 at 1:24 AM, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Not sous vide per se -- but as pertains to drying chicken:  I let tonight's half hen rest on a rack in the refrigerator for several hours.  The bird was not visibly less damp than when I put it in, except that some liquid had pooled in the pan below the rack.  Perchance next time I'll have the patience to try for 24 or 48.

 

But anyhow the chicken is currently getting a blowout.

 

 

24 hrs in the fridge does a good job of drying most proteins 

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Last night we co-hosted the Fall Social for my DH’s grape growing/wine making group.  18 people with members bringing appetizers , salad and dessert.  Us and another couple were responsible for mains.

 

i decided to cook chicken breasts sous vide because nobody in the group has had this preparation.  Our co-hosts ,made a slow braised brisket and cheese mashed potatoes.  The chicken was cooked at 140f for 2 hrs then brushed with a sugar and water mix to help them brown quickly.  I sliced them and then poured a herb, garlic and cream sauce over them.  I also made pistachio butter carrots.  Most of the food was demolished (the brisket was delicious)....as well as 15 bottles of wine I might add.

 

Everyone remarked that the chicken was the best chicken breasts they had ever had. 

 

Misson accomplished....sous vide is becoming more main stream...Canadian Tire airs an ad on tv for a $125 stick sous vide machine.  It was fun to see people’s reaction to the meat in bags in the bath...they seemed a bit sceptical.

 

 

Edited by Okanagancook
Bottle recount..two bottles in the fridge (log)
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I've tried a couple of turkey recipes this week.  The first bird got the treatment as outlined in Chefsteps procedure for crispy, confit turkey legs and breast. The parts get a pre-sear followed by sous vide of the leg/thigh for 12 hours at 149 F then add the breast with another 12  hours at 131 F.  A final sear and it was ready for the plate.  I'll probably repeat this for Thanksgiving dinner.  The meat was moist with a nice texture and will make a nice presentation.  Here's a picture of the pre-seared and seasoned turkey prior to the hot water bath.  

rIMG_20181104_082430901_HDR.thumb.jpg.6a0e1f770f3e43a81329505130a08873.jpg

 

Last night I prepped a 16# turkey with the breast and tenderloins prepared for sous vide and the remainder into the pressure cooker for stock and meals for our dog.  The breast were prepared following Serious Eats Turchetta recipe and the tenderloins were bacon  wrapped.  I used transglutaminase to bond the skin and meat in both items.  I cooked the tenderloins for 4 hours at 130 F and the Turchetta for a total of ~14 hours.   I finished both items with a quick fry in the wok.  The taste and texture were great for each.  

rIMG_20181116_111851450_HDR.thumb.jpg.cdd076581f2bfb3703d91a022a2dd113.jpg

 

This is an earlier photo using chicken breast and finishing the dish by browning in a skillet.

724048631_TransGlutChicken.thumb.jpg.1cf6c406dcbf26f4a094d00aa8dd01f3.jpg

 

And here's a photo my set-up.  I use an Anova cooker in a 12 qt. pot.  To minimize heat loss I set the pot on an old Styrofoam cooler lid with  blanket around it.  I top it with a piece of foil and it will go for 24 hours without adding any water.    For larger items I use a conventional cooler that I set-up in the garage.

IMG_20181116_071805344.thumb.jpg.760c993fb732f8f815914310819a073e.jpg

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aside from SV

 

the best turkey Ive ever made was following JuliaChild and JacquesPepin's

 

technique of deconstructing the turlkey

 

laying the meat on top of a double or triple portion of stuffing

 

and baking it carefully

 

this is the only way to make sure you get plenty of left over stuffing

 

a key to a Turkey dinner.

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  • 2 weeks later...

“Chicketta” - chicken legs, scored and rubbed with salt, garlic, fennel, rosemary, chili and black pepper. Rolled in the skin to form a roulade and SV’d for 150 min @ 70oC. Checked for consistency & taste, very pleasant.

Will think about deep frying or finishing from cold in the convection oven. Or maybe removing skin layer and then breading and deep frying - so many options 🧐 ...

 

AD761497-611D-431A-8D45-A8E62643ABF7.jpeg

03A0F5F3-D8F7-4FA4-B637-A6F62A11F5A1.jpeg

Edited by Duvel (log)
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5 hours ago, Duvel said:

“Chicketta” - chicken legs, scored and rubbed with salt, garlic, fennel, rosemary, chili and black pepper. Rolled in the skin to form a roulade and SV’d for 150 min @ 70oC. Checked for consistency & taste, very pleasant.

Will think about deep frying or finishing from cold in the convection oven. Or maybe removing skin layer and then breading and deep frying - so many options 🧐 ...

 

AD761497-611D-431A-8D45-A8E62643ABF7.jpeg

03A0F5F3-D8F7-4FA4-B637-A6F62A11F5A1.jpeg

 

Nice!

 

 

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Beef short ribs.

1.5 cup of store bought beef stock, dash of fish sauce, dash of apera (sherry-but we can't call it sherry anymore..sigh) 10 whole black peppercorns. Heated in top of stove, reduced slightly to about 1 cup. Let cool

(would have used red wine but I couldn't justify opening a bottle just for a dash, prefer to open closer to consuming) (and no, whilst appealing, I am already struggling with weight so sitting and drinking a good red wouldn't help because I would not get anything else done.)

placed in bag with 2 boneless beef short ribs. 62C for ~52 hrs (was going to do 48 but more convenient to just let it go longer.

Wrapped the ribs in foil, reduced the the liquid on stove by (now over a cup to about 0.25 cups, added a little cornflower (wheat starch) to thicken to make a rich beef sauce.

Put beef ribs in foil in 200C oven for a couple of minutes just to bring up to temperature.

Served with the sauce over ribs, along with dry mash potatoes (cook potatoes drain return to very low heat to evaporate any water, mash, add a little butter but no milk cream or anything else), steamed frozen green beans. Made a bechamel sauce

added,  half a teaspoons ground mustard & shredded tasty cheese, heated till cheese melted. Goes nicely over the mashed potatoes (& beans-mmm love bechamel sauce)

 

Texture & flavor and tenderness of the ribs was excellent, the sauce rich. The "dry" mash gives a really nice mouth feel with the slightly tart bechamel/mustard/cheese sauce. Very good counterpoint to the richness of the beef sauce. Beans just finish off the balance nicely.

Now was the correct time to open the red wine. (a 4 year old straight Malbec)

As usual never think to take photos till afterwards, then its too late.

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Got some nice veal shin yesterday and decided to do a SV braise. I prepared a sauce with the usual suspects: onions, carrots, garlic, tomato purée, white wine, bay leave - and augmented with fish sauce, oyster sauce, powdered porcini and two tablespoons of ‘Nduja. The sauce was probably the most umami thing I have made in a long time; I had difficulties not to eat it on the spot, but 90% survived. As my vacuum sealer is a very basic model that can’t handle liquids, I froze the sauce on a tray.

 

C6854F0E-874B-40BA-9976-8148E4C00044.thumb.jpeg.fee5ee8ee84c8969ea9ca7f9b9e4a9c0.jpeg

 

Veal shin got a quick salt, pepper and sear treatment and was bagged with the frozen sauce sheet. 24h @ 176F.

 

51B709FD-832D-482F-AF36-136F0E596B22.thumb.jpeg.295a08065d5b5ec7775a19e141582ecb.jpeg

0BF8F340-5E80-4D7A-8CDB-757F457BF268.thumb.jpeg.86743f7053b24632ba54f448adfaae86.jpeg

 

Crostinis with the buttery bone marrow and Maldon flakes as a starter, followed by the tender shanks in just the strained bag juices (solids were discarded) on top of mashed oven potatoes with copious amounts of butter and nutmeg. Very, very satisfying ...

 

A58AAC08-CC60-4FB2-BC2B-090CFF0FB8C6.thumb.jpeg.d79980ab9232177d48c36ff729c21f5e.jpeg

64E64ECB-CFA3-4F12-BC9D-65166F32EF10.thumb.jpeg.467f7622b60d1fca854154a0a26e683e.jpeg

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Sooooo....taking a break from the keto thing?

(No judging here, my GF has to do that once a month or so as well.)

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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50 minutes ago, chromedome said:

Sooooo....taking a break from the keto thing?

(No judging here, my GF has to do that once a month or so as well.)

 

Every Sunday night ... about 100 g carbs. Better make it count 😉

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Yup. Scratch whichever itch is itchiest that week. :)

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

 Among the many gifts that Santa dropped  at my house was a nice hunk of picanha!  I just thus minute stashed it in the fridge after it had been sous vided for two hours at 54.5°C and then chilled in icewater.   Something to look forward to.   I used my trusty Joule having returned the ANOVA Nano to its owner. 

 

 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

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