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FrogPrincesse

What Are You Cooking Sous Vide Today? (Part 3)

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1 hour ago, daveb said:

I would not pre sear the duck breast per se.  But depending on mood might render some or most of fat off of the breast before I bag and tag it.  It's not going to come off in the bath and the post sear will be too fast/hot to render much of anything.

 

<question removed>

 

And I ain't skeered of 120F for 6 hours.  But don't know why one would do so.  126 - 130 for 1.5 is in neighborhood I usually do duck.

 

I ended up doing a slow render on stovetop and final quick sear, skipping the sous vide altogether. The final result wasn't as rare as I might have wished, but it wasn't tough and the skin fat was mostly rendered. We liked it.

 

In defense of the 120F for 6 hours objectors, those folks were discussing my treatment of a tri-tip: beef, not duck.

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Pork loin, sous vided at 212F (not a typo) for a few hours.

 

dcarch

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2 hours ago, dcarch said:

Pork loin, sous vided at 212F (not a typo) for a few hours.

 

dcarch

 

How did it turn out?

 

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not to be contrarian, but is that not BOILING?

 

 

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7 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

How did it turn out?

Terrible! 

 

4 hours ago, weedy said:

not to be contrarian, but is that not BOILING?

 

Please read on. Important for everyone.

I got the pork loin seasoned in the sous vide bag, set the sous vide PID controller to 140F for 8 hours. A few hours later I was going to take a look and see if the bag was fully submerged. I was horrified that water in the cooker was boiling and half of the water had been boiled away. The cooker had failed.

 

In all SV cookers, the high wattage heater power is controlled by a relay. Most likely, an electronic SSR relay (Solid State Relay). Those of you who are familiar with electric and electronics know that when an electric (mechanical) relay fails, it cuts out power totally. OTOH, when a SSR fails, it supplies full power none stop until something burns out, hopefully not your house.

 

Go to Amazon and do a seach on SSR, read the reviews and you will see SSR failures are not that uncommon.

 

dcarch

 

 

 

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12 minutes ago, dcarch said:

Terrible! 

 

Please read on. Important for everyone.

I got the pork loin seasoned in the sous vide bag, set the sous vide PID controller to 140F for 8 hours. A few hours later I was going to take a look and see if the bag was fully submerged. I was horrified that water in the cooker was boiling and half of the water had been boiled away. The cooker had failed.

 

In all SV cookers, the high wattage heater power is controlled by a relay. Most likely, an electronic SSR relay (Solid State Relay). Those of you who are familiar with electric and electronics know that when an electric (mechanical) relay fails, it cuts out power totally. OTOH, when a SSR fails, it supplies full power none stop until something burns out, hopefully not your house.

 

Go to Amazon and do a seach on SSR, read the reviews and you will see SSR failures are not that uncommon.

 

dcarch

 

 

 

Which brand?  Or was this something you rigged up yourself?

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8 hours ago, Anna N said:

Which brand?  Or was this something you rigged up yourself?

 

I have not read the specs for all the SV circulators. It would be a good idea to make sure that they incorporate safety devices to prevent runaway heat buildup.

 

My system had a thermal fuse, but the fuse was not functioning for some reason.

 

dcarch

 

 

 

 

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 A very small pork loin. Going to go 58°C for two hours as before. 

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In preparation for a potluck (perhaps a bit excessively), I used my new Joule and made a few recipes. Thanks to this post, I referenced some new cookbooks. The first I have had for several months, though as I have made many items, I didn't end up choosing many from that source. The second was from the library, so it became my focus.
 
From THE COMPLETE SOUS VIDE COOKBOOK by Chris McDonaldir?t=egulletcom-20&l=am2&o=1&a=978-07788, Canadian ex-restaurateur, I made
 
Aloo Gobi
with cauliflower, russet potatoes, garlic, jalapeno, ginger, coconut milk, coriander seeds, cumin seeds and turmeric.
 
_DSC7260_cropped_Sm.jpg.1fd2e929c21b165d4968ef644be3cefe.jpg
 
 
Pork Rib Adobo.
Marinated with cider vinegar, fish sauce, soy sauce, garlic, jalapeno, brown sugar, bay leaf, and black pepper. Then sous vide at 158F for 12 hours.
 
_DSC7261_Cropped_Sm.thumb.jpg.94e0312c0b6ed59b49cd06cb583d6dea.jpg
 
Coffee-Spiced Pork Tenderloin
Rubbed with ground coffee, brown sugar, cumin, cinnamon, paprika, cayenne. Then wrapped with cellophane. Then sous vide at 134.6F for 1 hour. Then seared a bit less than one minute per side.
Red Cabbage, Apple and Pecans. Red cabbage, dried cherries soaked in orange juice, apples, mustard and honey dressing with sprinkled with freshly roasted pecans.
 
_DSC7266_Sm.thumb.jpg.83da75d3deb5b83a36630bad89fc5d5c.jpg
 
_DSC7264_Sm.thumb.jpg.1d3a4ff352d06888e7f8354d731c68f2.jpg
Carne Asada (Skirt Steak) with Chimichurri Sauce.
Meat rubbed with cumin, sous vide at 130F for 21 hours.
Chimichurri: garlic, shallot, jalapeno, wine vinegar, fresh oregano, marjoram, cilantro, parsley, cumin, black pepper.
 
_DSC7265_Sm.thumb.jpg.f688124809534a09a2189fbaea727881.jpg
 
Jerk Chicken Wings.
Marinated with green onion, habanero, ginger, garlic, fresh thyme, nutmeg, brown sugar, soy sauce, and lime juice. Then sous vide at 170.6F for 2 hours, then broiled to make a crust.
 
_DSC7263_Sm.thumb.jpg.90f1d9d58885ad4e5677a871578423e4.jpg
 
And a couple of other non sous vide items. A pomegranate, avocado, lime and mint salad.
 
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Let the adventure begin! My Anova is due to be delivered tomorrow. I'm thinking boneless skinless chicken breasts. Now, to decide on a recipe!

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The Anova was delivered early enough in the day that we decided to make the burgers, which we were planning to grill, sous vide and finished on the grill. They turned out great!

 

IMG_0481.thumb.JPG.bd14a84d0fa1743665209f22beeb9eee.JPG

 

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In the midst of roasted squash and grilled peppers and onions below is a perfectly MR flank steak, finished on the grill.

 

Like SV for flank, skirt, LB, cause you can't overcook the thin pieces and you can get it a bit more tender than convention cooking.

 

3 (ish) hrs @ 129F then sear.

 

20170604_181200.thumb.jpg.254e89ea2f05e9179ec0a6d6b6bb5203.jpg

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"Kassler Kamm": Pork neck, dry-cured for two days, rubbed with a little gin & liquid smoke, then SV for 20h @ 60 oC.

Will make terrific sandwiches, but most of it was char-grilled today. Yummy 9_9

 

WP_20170611_11_39_34_Rich.jpg

WP_20170611_16_53_22_Rich.jpg

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Not really cooking but have a 4 lb frozen chuck roast thawing in the sink with the Anova moving the water.  Will thaw in half the time

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Posted (edited)

I will be putting one inch chuck steaks in a 158 F bath for 15 hours.  The meat will be added to my navy bean dish for the Syrian fund raising dinner we are putting on.  The meat will just be heated with beans before being served.  I tried this out last week and it worked really well.  The meat was tender but still juicy.


Edited by Okanagancook (log)
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The last sirloin cap in my freezer (picanha).  55°C x 2 hours. 

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The chuck steaks are out and this really showed how the quality of meat determines the outcome.  I had six steaks cooked all the same way.  Some seemed a little dry and others were quite moist and more tender than other pieces.

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10 minutes ago, Okanagancook said:

The chuck steaks are out and this really showed how the quality of meat determines the outcome.  I had six steaks cooked all the same way.  Some seemed a little dry and others were quite moist and more tender than other pieces.

 

I'm curious - were the steaks purchased at the same time from the same place?

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Chuck eye steaks in Lawry's Steak & Chop marinade, 133 F for 4 hours, then a sear.

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On 2017-06-13 at 4:00 PM, ElsieD said:

 

I'm curious - were the steaks purchased at the same time from the same place?

Yes there was two large packages of three steaks.

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1 hour ago, Porthos said:

Chuck eye steaks in Lawry's Steak & Chop marinade, 133 F for 4 hours, then a sear.

Yes, that is the way I would cook them for us but these were for the Syrian fund raising dinner I am cooking for.  The steaks were put into a bean based stew so the meat had to look braised.

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Although I live in the greater Los Angeles area and have 5 major supermarkets within 2 miles of my home, only one of them ever has chuck eye steaks. These were purchased fresh today. I put 2 in the freezer and the other 2 were in the SV bath an hour and a half after being purchased. Because they are hard to come by this will be my first try at cooking this particular cut SV.

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Second time playing with my new toy! Lamb Rib Chops finished on the grill. So good!

 

IMG_0501.thumb.JPG.4bfc068fc27b30133f72762e30fac1b6.JPG

 

 

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Upthread (is that a word?)  I posted about preparing beef tenderloin for retirement center  I work for.  It went over well.

 

2morrow I've been given license with 3 boneless prime ribs, just shy of 50lbs.

 

PR  swimming at 145F for 6 hpurs.

 

20170617_181238.thumb.jpg.7a2364a4d09cd19b04267bd76374a89c.jpg

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Out of the bath yesterday, in the walk in overnight, rethermed then into 500F oven.  Hanging out here to keep warm prior to carving.  No complaints.

20170618_114541.jpg

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