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FrogPrincesse

What Are You Cooking Sous Vide Today? (Part 3)

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8A3117D3-E785-45F9-B0CA-C64DC30DABF8.thumb.jpeg.15c014507e10c6d310101ec8e8fa7a8c.jpegCD742719-372F-4A5F-B7AC-6CCAE940BC34.thumb.jpeg.1b6832dcc87d9ec4573ddeb188e914bc.jpeg

 

 Out of the bath and out of the bag. Patted dry. Seasoned and oiled before a quick sear. 

 

F50B64A6-925B-4DCA-885B-79CCE812F247.thumb.jpeg.6c75e8bf2de90c331124eef67b839061.jpeg

 

 Life rarely gets better than this. Freshly made Modernist lean French bread and 56°C x 24 hour sous vide chuck eye. 

 

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I've been talking with dear friends who live about an hour and a half away from us. Due to a variety of health challenges, they haven't made any plans for a festive meal at Christmastime yet, nor have they gotten any invitations to join others who live nearby as the usual suspects are all occupied with houseguests. Nothing's confirmed yet and everything's weather-dependent in these parts at this time of year, but if we wanted to cook some chunk of beast SV ahead of time at our house and then finish it at their house, what would be the best way to reheat said chunk of beast? Would we do best to bring an appropriate container and the Anova, and use that for the reheating? For something like a steak or pork tenderloin, is there any advantage in cooking it ahead, or would it be better to do the prep and sealing here and just do all the cooking there? Any other options?

 

(If you all have any ideas for something that might come across as festive, but be easy to eat one-handed for someone who's just had a shoulder replaced, please chime in. I'm wondering if we'd do better to ditch the whole chunk of beast idea in favor of a spread of charcuterie, cheeses, fruits fresh and dried, an assortment of crackers, and the like, combined with a nice bottle of something.)

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2 hours ago, MelissaH said:

if we'd do better to ditch the whole chunk of beast idea in favor of a spread of charcuterie,

As someone who always seems to be recuperating from something I vote for this idea. If someone has had shoulder surgery then sitting up at the dining room table might prove to be more akin to torture than celebration. To be able to sit in a comfortable chair (or perhaps even lounge) and have a spread on a coffee table within easy reach...    I know which one I would choose. 

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If you’re talking about long multi hour cooks, then sure, SV it and then retherm there with the circulator. 

But for the typical 1-2 hr cooks, it takes as long to retherm, or near enough,  so I’d prob just cook there. 

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I have a 3 lb rump roast I am looking to sous vide.  Hoping for something akin to pot roast as a finished product.  What time and temperature is recommended?

 

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9 hours ago, MelissaH said:

(If you all have any ideas for something that might come across as festive, but be easy to eat one-handed for someone who's just had a shoulder replaced, please chime in. I'm wondering if we'd do better to ditch the whole chunk of beast idea in favor of a spread of charcuterie, cheeses, fruits fresh and dried, an assortment of crackers, and the like, combined with a nice bottle of something.)

 

I'm with @Anna N. I vote for the more or less cocktail buffet type thing, which will be much more feasible for the recuperating patient. One thing I like is to make ham and cheese rolls like one would make cinnamon rolls; grind the ham fairly fine in a food processor, grate the cheese (I've used smoked Gouda, or Cheddar, or whatever strikes your fancy), roll out the yeast dough, layer the cheese and ham, roll up, slice. You can put them in the fridge at that point, or even the freezer, depending on how far you need to travel with them, and bake them when you get there. I pour a sauce made of brown sugar, Worcestershire and Dijon mustard over the rolls just before I bake them. They make a great version of a cocktail sandwich.

 

You could also do sliders with pork or beef tenderloin in rolls; take the cooked meat with you and bake the rolls and assemble the sliders there. Crab cake sliders are pretty fun, as well.

 

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13 hours ago, kayb said:

Crab cake sliders are pretty fun, as well.

I'm sure they do, unless someone in the house has a shellfish allergy.

 

Tomorrow, I'll touch base with my friend and find out if they've made other plans or if we'll be bringing the holiday cheer, weather permitting.

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On 12/17/2017 at 12:14 PM, MelissaH said:

Tomorrow, I'll touch base with my friend and find out if they've made other plans or if we'll be bringing the holiday cheer, weather permitting.

And my friend says...we're cooking dinner. And a stuffed pork tenderloin will be quite festive. They'll provide the bread, salad, and beverages.

 

Our usual pork stuffing is mostly dried fruit. We stuff the tenderloin by using a long skinny knife to make a slit down the middle, and then enlarging the hole with a wooden spoon handle or something of that sort. The stuffing goes in and gets pushed to the middle, and then the ends get tied off to keep the stuffing from leaking out. Could I just vacuum the stuffed tenderloin in a bag, and cook it as though it were unstuffed? Or, what changes would you make? I'm thinking we do the prep here, and bring the Anova, our bucket, and a cast iron skillet for the searing.

 

And is there anything else that you can think of that might help round out the meal? Baked potatoes?

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On 12/10/2017 at 9:40 AM, MelissaH said:

What fat did you use?

 

1/4 cup of avocado oil per two legs.

The legs were 'cured' in salt, pepper, thyme, onion and a tiny bit of garlic.

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Following a pork loin discussion in the dinner thread I have two thick pork loin chops in the bath, pretending to be roasts.  Thick in this case being 4 cm.  The temperature is 59 Celsius and I am aiming for 2 1/2 hours.  My salt preserved sage in the bags.

 

I still have not decided if or how to sear the chop roast.

 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Following a pork loin discussion in the dinner thread I have two thick pork loin chops in the bath, pretending to be roasts.  Thick in this case being 4 cm.  The temperature is 59 Celsius and I am aiming for 2 1/2 hours.  My salt preserved sage in the bags.

 

I still have not decided if or how to sear the chop roast.

 

Think I'd not sear unless cosmesis is important. OTOH if you like some chew in your pork then a little sear will provide that. I'd probably put some soy on there pre sear 

 

Eh, at 59 C it will have enough bite to it. 


Edited by gfweb (log)
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15 minutes ago, gfweb said:

Think I'd not sear unless cosmesis is important. OTOH if you like some chew in your pork then a little sear will provide that. I'd probably put some soy on there pre sear 

 

Eh, at 59 C it will have enough bite to it. 

 

 

I still have not decided.  Dinner is delayed because I found some peanuts.

 

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On 12/19/2017 at 6:48 AM, MelissaH said:

And my friend says...we're cooking dinner. And a stuffed pork tenderloin will be quite festive. They'll provide the bread, salad, and beverages.

 

Our usual pork stuffing is mostly dried fruit. We stuff the tenderloin by using a long skinny knife to make a slit down the middle, and then enlarging the hole with a wooden spoon handle or something of that sort. The stuffing goes in and gets pushed to the middle, and then the ends get tied off to keep the stuffing from leaking out. Could I just vacuum the stuffed tenderloin in a bag, and cook it as though it were unstuffed? Or, what changes would you make? I'm thinking we do the prep here, and bring the Anova, our bucket, and a cast iron skillet for the searing.

 

And is there anything else that you can think of that might help round out the meal? Baked potatoes?

 

Vaguely related, I just experimented with sort of an inside-out version of this or a pork version of Beef Wellington (Porc Napoleon?). Sous vide pork tenderloin (heritage pig and quite flavorful) @ 59 C then wrapped in a mixture of sauteed mushroom, apple & spices then in puff pastry. I thought it was pretty good but the pork was overdone, even though I tried to keep the oven very hot to just cook the pastry. Next time I'll either not sous vide the pork or else use less pastry ( I had several wrapped sheets) and crank the heat even more.

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Here's my loin...

 

Loin01022017.png

 

 

When it came down to the wire I had no other kitchen surface except the floor, so I threw it under the CSO broiler for a couple minutes.  I was pleased.

 

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On 12/18/2017 at 2:48 PM, MelissaH said:

And my friend says...we're cooking dinner. And a stuffed pork tenderloin will be quite festive. They'll provide the bread, salad, and beverages.

 

Our usual pork stuffing is mostly dried fruit. We stuff the tenderloin by using a long skinny knife to make a slit down the middle, and then enlarging the hole with a wooden spoon handle or something of that sort. The stuffing goes in and gets pushed to the middle, and then the ends get tied off to keep the stuffing from leaking out. Could I just vacuum the stuffed tenderloin in a bag, and cook it as though it were unstuffed? Or, what changes would you make? I'm thinking we do the prep here, and bring the Anova, our bucket, and a cast iron skillet for the searing.

 

And is there anything else that you can think of that might help round out the meal? Baked potatoes?

 

After the roll is stuffed, bagged and tagged, I like to roll it in a sushi mat and tie it.  Preserves the cylindrical shape.

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On 12/18/2017 at 2:48 PM, MelissaH said:

And my friend says...we're cooking dinner. And a stuffed pork tenderloin will be quite festive. They'll provide the bread, salad, and beverages.

 

Our usual pork stuffing is mostly dried fruit. We stuff the tenderloin by using a long skinny knife to make a slit down the middle, and then enlarging the hole with a wooden spoon handle or something of that sort. The stuffing goes in and gets pushed to the middle, and then the ends get tied off to keep the stuffing from leaking out. Could I just vacuum the stuffed tenderloin in a bag, and cook it as though it were unstuffed? Or, what changes would you make? I'm thinking we do the prep here, and bring the Anova, our bucket, and a cast iron skillet for the searing.

 

 

 

You might try butterflying the tenderloin, salting it,  putting in the filling and rolling and tying it. You get more filling this way and it looks fancy. SVs up nicely

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We wound up doing a "stuffed" pork tenderloin recipe from the latest Fine Cooking (December 2017, maybe?), in which the pork tenderloin itself is the stuffing, and the "stuffing" (a fairly ordinary bread/dried apricot/seasoning mixture) goes outside of that, and then the whole thing has an outer coating of prosciutto. You make it by laying out a big piece of plastic wrap, shingling slices of prosciutto on that, spreading chilled stuffing over the prosciutto, and then placing the tenderloin near one end and rolling. The roll gets chilled, and then the whole thing gets roasted on a rack, with a glaze added towards the end. It was delicious.

 

We also had microwave-in-the-bag green beans, SV carrots that I cooked the night before and then we finished on the spot by concentrating in a frying pan, bread, cheeses, and the charlotte royale from the same issue of Fine Cooking. It all went over delightfully well. And better yet, we even got home before the snow started!

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Posted (edited)

I finally found a Chuck Tender roast a one of my supermarkets.  this cut does not seem to be marketed often around here.

 

it was of course on Sale so i thought id experiment with it.

 

ChuckTender.thumb.jpg.b89f75c129a76e7e22aa0842690e4654.jpg

 

there was a little bit of silverskin , which i removed.

 

i gave each side a few drops of RedBoat4o and some granulated garlic from Penzey's and place it on a plate

 

very loosely wrapped in the refrig and Ill go for 3 days , then bag it.  I hope to find my granulated toasted onion from Penzies by then and

 

as some to the meat before i vacuum bag and SV at 130.1

 

i think at least 24 hours , maybe 36 H

 

the goal is then to freeze and use thinly cut for steak sandwiches in the future.

 

have you SV'd this cut ?

 

what were your times and temps and final plan for the meat ?

 

thanks


Edited by rotuts (log)
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18 minutes ago, rotuts said:

I finally found a Chuck Tender roast a one of my supermarkets.  this cut does not seem to be marketed often around here.

 

it was of course on Sale so i thought id experiment with it.

 

ChuckTender.thumb.jpg.b89f75c129a76e7e22aa0842690e4654.jpg

 

there was a little bit of silverskin , which i removed.

 

i gave each side a few drops of RedBoat4o and some granulated garlic from Penzey's and place it on a plate

 

very loosely wrapped in the refrig and Ill go for 3 days , then bag it.  I hope to find my granulated toasted onion from Penzies by then and

 

as some to the meat before i vacuum bag and SV at 103.1

 

i think at least 24 hours , maybe 36 H

 

the goal is then to freeze and use thinly cut for steak sandwiches in the future.

 

have you SV'd this cut ?

 

what were your times and temps and final plan for the meat ?

 

thanks

 

What was that SV temp?

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Posted (edited)

here are a few more pics of the above project.

 

I decided to cut up the Roast into three pieces , as they would be easier to deal with when SV'd and Fz :

 

5a55169247a34_CTender1.thumb.jpg.a8ae9d8e962fc7a3d6c09d67b59e7b80.jpg

 

the whole trimmed roast , sans  silver skin

 

i cut this into 3 :  

 

5a5516b8e3729_CTender2.thumb.jpg.928dbe02a701522357f4265c0517cb35.jpg

 

the thinner end  ( far R )  1/3 , and the 2/3'd thicker end cut in 1/2  ( L )

 

it does take quite a Leap of Faith to work w RedBoat40 in its initial liquid form !

 

laughing.gif.aff410d68ebf7048e105ae80361a11f4.gif

 

of course I fully understand the Chuck Tender is not initially tender at all.

 

hoping SV will fix that , and RB40 / garlic powder / toasted Onion powder ( should i find it in time )  

 

might provide interesting flavors.

 

I chose not to use my favs   Penzey's Chicago Steak and Sauer's Roast Prime Rib  

 

because of their salt content  and this will be a long SV


Edited by rotuts (log)

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 There are some sources that suggest that it earned the name tender not because it’s tender but because its shape resembles the tenderloin. 

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Posted (edited)

P.S:   I keen on hearing from anyone who has done a Chick Tender SV

 

viz   the final flavor of the meat.

 

granted im enhancing it , and SV will take care of tenderness.

 

i know its never going to taste like  Blade Roast , its neighbor  on the 7-Blade roast.

 

here is a 7-blade roast :

 

5a551b3b50326_7-BoneChuckRoast_psd.jpeg.b35117502d0bdacc58e6b240a26ded0a.jpeg

 

note the muscle on the L that has a thin tendon running through it :  that's the Blade

 

Blade.jpg.d81ad09011b2c53bff5a147b807dc217.jpg

 

, which can be trimmed out as a roast

 

very tasty , look for it as a roast

 

then moving NE  there is a bone off the flat part of the scapula.  the meat NE of the blade is the Chuck Tender

 

CTender.jpg.34ff7a5ee5f42d5b547949b32e2fb9e6.jpg

 

also of note  ;  on the far upper R  is the Chuck Eye , a continuation  of the Rib Eye Muscle , as its the same musle

 

 

 , but towards the shoulder of the Beast ;

 

 

C Eye.jpg


Edited by rotuts (log)
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