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FrogPrincesse

What Are You Cooking Sous Vide Today? (Part 3)

307 posts in this topic

@Captain  

 

Iu actually support your metnod

 

they tell you and your guests

 

that you bought carrots w tops

 

i.e. still fresh

 

and not ion the Cooler for 6 months

 

so Finbe !

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Hoping that @BonVivant reads this!

 

Quoting: 

SV rhubarb is great. It keeps its shape, texture and colour."

 

love to know temperature and timing. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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On 2017-07-02 at 4:15 PM, ElsieD said:

 

Yeah, I know.  Contrast that with today.  I went to T & T, an Asian store as they were advertising Angus Beef Chuck roll roasts.  They cut me three of them and the guy practically wouldn't release them to me until I promised not to overcook them.  He kept on telling me how good, tender, well marbled (true) they are and if I overcook them bad things will happen to a lovely piece of meat and did I know it was almost as good as rib eye.  Etc., etc.  I'll bet HE knows what heritage pork is.

 

By they way, I have one roast in the bath at 133F.  I plan on cooking it 48 hours.  Is that about right?  I don't have any experience cooking these roasts sous vide.

I am sorry for my late reply...did not see your question.  How did they turn out?  I think they were pretty tender...that's what I would have done.  I do my flank steaks at 131f for 24 hrs and they are tender but I think chuck would need longer.

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On 7/4/2017 at 8:48 PM, Okanagancook said:

I am sorry for my late reply...did not see your question.  How did they turn out?  I think they were pretty tender...that's what I would have done.  I do my flank steaks at 131f for 24 hrs and they are tender but I think chuck would need longer.

 

 

The roast was terrific.  Couldn't believe how good it was.

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On 05/07/2017 at 0:34 AM, Anna N said:

Hoping that @BonVivant reads this!

 

Quoting: 

SV rhubarb is great. It keeps its shape, texture and colour."

 

love to know temperature and timing. 

 

 

61C, upto 45mins. I like mine no longer than 20mins. Might be still a bit firm if one likes their rhubarb soft.

 

Owf8FU9.jpg

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I made a chicken pasta salad for dinner tonight. I used chicken thighs in Sunny Delight (because I didn't have orange juice handy), lime juice and Sweet Lou's Greek Isle seasoning mix (Sweet Lou's Spices). 4 hours at 147 F.


Porthos Potwatcher
The Once and Future Cook

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I found a mark-down choice cross-rib roast for $3.24/lb. I cut it into 2 meals-worth of steaks. One will go into a 133 F bath for 4 1/2 hours for tonight's dinner. 

 

I currently have 2 bags of chicken leg meat in veggie broth in a 147 F bath that will go into the freezer.  One is earmarked for chicken stroganof.


Porthos Potwatcher
The Once and Future Cook

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The cross-rib steaks were tasty enough but not as tender as I had hoped.  I've not done much with longer times.  I think I want to try 12 hours for the other package. Anything I should be aware of?


Porthos Potwatcher
The Once and Future Cook

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I was at a butcher's today and we had a discussion about the merits of sous vide.  He too is a fan of this cooking method.  One thing he cooks sous vide is sausage.  He says he does them for 20 to 30 minutes and then browns  them in a frying pan.  He says they retain their juiciness that way.  It has never occurred to me to do sausages sous vide.  Does anyone else cook them this way?

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1 hour ago, ElsieD said:

I was at a butcher's today and we had a discussion about the merits of sous vide.  He too is a fan of this cooking method.  One thing he cooks sous vide is sausage.  He says he does them for 20 to 30 minutes and then browns  them in a frying pan.  He says they retain their juiciness that way.  It has never occurred to me to do sausages sous vide.  Does anyone else cook them this way?

 

Thanks for the reminder, I've been meaning to try this since I read this on Serious Eats last year.

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13 hours ago, ElsieD said:

It has never occurred to me to do sausages sous vide.  Does anyone else cook them this way?

 

Yes, sausage and cure meat (cottage ham and the like) was the justification for my first sous vide rig.

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~Martin

Unsupervised rebellious radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader and adventurous cook. Crotchety cantankerous terse curmudgeon, nonconformist, contrarian and natural born skeptic who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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21 hours ago, ElsieD said:

I was at a butcher's today and we had a discussion about the merits of sous vide.  He too is a fan of this cooking method.  One thing he cooks sous vide is sausage.  He says he does them for 20 to 30 minutes and then browns  them in a frying pan.  He says they retain their juiciness that way.  It has never occurred to me to do sausages sous vide.  Does anyone else cook them this way?

 

I do them (professionally) at 155 for about an hour, then into a frying pan or hot oven to crisp the casing.  The advantage of the oven over the pan is that the whole casing gets brown and not just the part touching the pan.  You can pull them before an hour, but they'll take a little longer in the pan to finish cooking through.

 

If you need to hold them, they hold at 137 for basically forever.  They'll shed a little fat, but not enough to matter.

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21 hours ago, blue_dolphin said:

 

Thanks for the reminder, I've been meaning to try this since I read this on Serious Eats last year.

 

@blue_dolphinI am a big fan of serious eats and I don't know how I missed this one.  Thanks for the link.  And, @longroper, thank you too.

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Posted (edited)

I'm cooking beef short ribs stock in the thermocirculator.

I don't like use plastic bags and bones in hight temperature. So I used a pan inside the cooler. The water level is very important to keep the right temperature in the pan, But works very well.

IMG_20170716_112155781_HDR.jpg

 

Leftovers

IMG_20170716_130842932_HDR.jpg

 

 

IMG_20170716_130857078_HDR.jpg

 

The sotck had a fat layer, that was cooled and removed.

IMG_20170716_133441299_HDR.jpg

 

The stock will be used in a short rib and wine ravioli recipe.

I'll try make a 72h sous vide short rib with wine sauce, and make a wine and sage gelatine to stuff a raviolli.


Edited by Auro (log)
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Learning

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7 hours ago, Auro said:

<Lovely photos and post shortened for brevity's sake>

 

The stock will be used in a short rib and wine ravioli recipe.

I'll try make a 72h sous vide short rib with wine sauce, and make a wine and sage gelatine to stuff a raviolli.

 

 

Please do post about it, if not in this topic then in another.  The ravioli idea sounds excellent, and I'm still working up to long cooks like 72h short ribs.

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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On 7/16/2017 at 7:15 AM, ElsieD said:

I was at a butcher's today and we had a discussion about the merits of sous vide.  He too is a fan of this cooking method.  One thing he cooks sous vide is sausage.  He says he does them for 20 to 30 minutes and then browns  them in a frying pan.  He says they retain their juiciness that way.  It has never occurred to me to do sausages sous vide.  Does anyone else cook them this way?

 

Of course we were the vanguard here on eG. I think there may be even earlier discussions, too.

 

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It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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9 hours ago, Smithy said:

 

Please do post about it, if not in this topic then in another.  The ravioli idea sounds excellent, and I'm still working up to long cooks like 72h short ribs.

The inspiration of this dish is in the 46 minutes.

 


I will change a lot off ingredients, but the ideia is make a yellow polenta base, a short ribs  and in the top a raviolli filled with a great wine and sage sauce.

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Learning

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Today I picked up 2 chuck eye roasts.  I have never cooked this cut mainly because it is devilishly hard to find here.  These  I got from a specialty  butcher who cut them for me this morning and netted and vacuum packed them for me.  My question is, is it better to cook them then freeze or freeze them uncooked, thaw and cook them when i want to eat them? They each weigh about 1 3/4 pounds and will be cooked at 134F.  Thank you.

20170718_164608.jpg

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@ElsieD 

 

what an excellent question

 

I have no idea.

 

unless you hear differently

 

Ive had no complaints from

 

me

 

as I do the cook first  then the rapid chill then the freeze  

 

Im only wondering if you freeze firist

 

it might change the texture of the meat

 

where as once it cooks

 

the meat might be 

 

'' set up better '' for the freeze  ?

 

pure speculation on my part

 

however  ..............

 

nice Haul !

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I would freeze until needed.

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I would pasteurize and refrigerate till needed.

 

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Well, you have two so you could try both ways and report back.

 

But I wouldn't thaw before cooking/reheating - just drop the bag right in the bath.

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It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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I froze one uncooked and decided to cook the second one at 134F for 48 hours.  It will be ready in time for dinner tomorrow but I haven't decided whether to eat it then or freeze it.  Maybe we will just eat half and freeze the other half as I am curious to see the difference texture wise between cooked, frozen and reheated and not.

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Going to try sausages tonight.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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12 minutes ago, Anna N said:

Going to try sausages tonight.

 

Looking forward to reading about it.

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